Tuesday, May 16th 2017

AMD Ryzen 9 Series "Threadripper" CPU Socket Detailed

AMD Ryzen 9 "Threadripper" series 12-core, 14-core, and 16-core client desktop processors, which will form the company's next-generation high-end desktop (HEDT) lineup, which goes against Intel Core i9 "Skylake-X" series, could come in a brand new socket. This shouldn't come as a surprise because the chips have higher electrical requirements, besides double the I/O of socket AM4 Ryzen processors, such as a 44-lane PCIe gen 3.0 root complex, quad-channel DDR4 memory interface, and more. This socket, according to a "HotHardware" report, is an LGA (land-grid array) with 4,094 pins.

The new LGA-4094 socket, so-called SP3r2, will be slightly scaled up from the SP3 socket AMD has been selling enterprise Opteron-brand multi-socket CPUs on (pictured below). The consumer version of this socket could feature a more user-friendly retention mechanism that shouldn't require a screwdriver to fasten. Motherboards based on this distinctively rectangular socket will feature up to eight DDR4 DIMM slots to hold quad-channel DDR4 memory, and over four PCI-Express 3.0 x16 slots, with support for 3-way and 4-way multi-GPU solutions. The motherboards will also feature copious amounts of onboard devices, M.2 slots, and other storage connectivity. Since "Threadripper" is rumored to be a multi-chip module of two 14 nm "Summit Ridge" dies linked together on-package with with an Infinity Fabric interconnect, only one of the two dies links to the motherboard chipset (AMD X399 chipset), while all the PCIe lanes of the second die (including those which would make up the chipset bus) are freed up.
Source: HotHardware
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46 Comments on AMD Ryzen 9 Series "Threadripper" CPU Socket Detailed

#1
csatahajos
Not that I want to nitpcik but the picture shows an LGA 3647 socket which is for Intel's new Xeon's (the socket name is even printed on the plastic coverplate.

This is Socket SP3, and this pic was leaked quite a while ago:
Posted on Reply
#2
oxidized
i wish they used LGA for ryzen 3/5/7 too :(
Posted on Reply
#3
Imsochobo
oxidized said:
i wish they used LGA for ryzen 3/5/7 too :(
pro's and cons.
LGA can be a royal pain, more so than cpu pins.
Posted on Reply
#4
oxidized
Imsochobo said:
pro's and cons.
LGA can be a royal pain, more so than cpu pins.
PGA has the downside of no brackets to hold the cpu, resulting in pulling up the cpu together with the heatsink sometimes
Posted on Reply
#5
YukikazeQ
oxidized said:
PGA has the downside of no brackets to hold the cpu, resulting in pulling up the cpu together with the heatsink sometimes
Sounds like a layer 8 issue.
Posted on Reply
#6
oxidized
YukikazeQ said:
Sounds like a layer 8 issue.
Not really, it's a pretty famous "issue"
Posted on Reply
#7
YukikazeQ
oxidized said:
Not really, it's a pretty famous "issue"
Doesn't make it any less layer 8 ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
Posted on Reply
#8
oxidized
YukikazeQ said:
Doesn't make it any less layer 8 ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
it's just something that wouldn't happen if either a modified PGA socket or LGA were used, so stop excusing everything
Posted on Reply
#9
TheinsanegamerN
oxidized said:
it's just something that wouldn't happen if either a modified PGA socket or LGA were used, so stop excusing everything
You're the one trying to excuse themselves from the infamous layer 8 issue.
Posted on Reply
#10
oxidized
TheinsanegamerN said:
You're the one trying to excuse themselves from the infamous layer 8 issue.
I'm not excusing anything lol. the "issue" is real, LGA socket is better in those terms
Posted on Reply
#11
ADHDGAMING
oxidized said:
it's just something that wouldn't happen if either a modified PGA socket or LGA were used, so stop excusing everything
I have never had that happen .. but at the same time i always wiggle the heatsink a bit before i try to just go yanking parts out that have been stuck together for maybe a year or so.
Posted on Reply
#12
thesmokingman
oxidized said:
PGA has the downside of no brackets to hold the cpu, resulting in pulling up the cpu together with the heatsink sometimes
Twist before pulling, how hard is that?
Posted on Reply
#13
lexluthermiester
I love this! AMD is really giving Intel competition, despite the AMD stock market issue[which it seems to be recovering from nicely]. This level of competition can only be good for the market. Fun times ahead...as long as we can get the Windows 10 problems sorted.
Posted on Reply
#14
oxidized
thesmokingman said:
Twist before pulling, how hard is that?
it could happen anyway, but the point is why should i twist the hs? What if i have no space to twist it?
Posted on Reply
#15
Totally
oxidized said:
I'm not excusing anything lol. the "issue" is real, LGA socket is better in those terms
He right it's firmly a layer 8 issue, seriously how difficult is it to twist the cooler a little before removing it?
Posted on Reply
#16
oxidized
Totally said:
He right it's firmly a layer 8 issue, seriously how difficult is it to twist the cooler a little before removing it?
LGA is better, just accept it
Posted on Reply
#17
Totally
oxidized said:
LGA is better, just accept it
Again, I disagree getting a CPU rma'd is a lot easier than getting a mb rma if outside the retail 30 day.
Posted on Reply
#18
oxidized
Totally said:
Again, I disagree getting a CPU rma'd is a lot easier than getting a mb rma if outside the retail 30 day.
Bending mobo's pins is far harder since they're not even pins, more like contact points, super low profile you'd have to go and damage them on purpose, but the pins thing is far more acceptable than risking damaging both socket and cpu, by breaking pins inside the socket while pulling up the hs
Posted on Reply
#19
lexluthermiester
oxidized said:
it could happen anyway, but the point is why should i twist the hs? What if i have no space to twist it?
As a general rule this is not big deal. Always pull the HS straight up from the socket. If the CPU sticks, it'll come straight up without hurting the socket or bending pins. Then the CPU is easily pulled away from the HS. No big deal, just have to be careful.
Posted on Reply
#20
Totally
oxidized said:
Bending mobo's pins is far harder since they're not even pins, more like contact points, super low profile you'd have to go and damage them on purpose,
I have seen pins get bent, knocked out of alignment because the cpu was dropped on the socket.
but the pins thing is far more acceptable than risking damaging both socket and cpu, by breaking pins inside the socket while pulling up the hs
Common sense makes this non-issue
Posted on Reply
#21
oxidized
lexluthermiester said:
As a general rule this is not big deal. Always pull the HS straight up from the socket. If the CPU sticks, it'll come straight up without hurting the socket or bending pins. Then the CPU is easily pulled away from the HS. No big deal, just have to be careful.
Guys, LGA is better, that's the point, i'm not saying you can't prevent any kind of problem on PGA, but LGA is far more user friendly, and secure.

Totally said:
I have seen pins get bent, knocked out of alignment because the cpu was dropped on the socket.
I build countless of pcs with LGA socket, never, never had issues in any way with it
Posted on Reply
#22
Totally
oxidized said:


I build countless of pcs with LGA socket, never, never had issues in any way with it
I could say the same thing about PGA
Posted on Reply
#23
oxidized
Totally said:
I could say the same thing about PGA
Good, but LGA is better
Posted on Reply
#24
lexluthermiester
oxidized said:
Guys, LGA is better, that's the point, i'm not saying you can't prevent any kind of problem on PGA, but LGA is far more user friendly, and secure. I build countless of pcs with LGA socket, never, never had issues in any way with it
Building/servicing/repairing PC's is a part of my profession as well and has been for the better part of 30 years. Each socket type has it's pro's and con's. The mistake you're making is that you're asserting your opinion as a concrete fact when it is not. It is only your opinion. A bent pin on a PGA CPU is a MUCH easier fix than a damaged pin in an LGA socket. That is only one example of many as to why some people feel PGA is a better methodology.
Posted on Reply
#25
thesmokingman
oxidized said:
LGA is better, just accept it
Stop hijacking a news thread with your whining.
Posted on Reply
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