Thursday, June 1st 2017

AMD Readies Nine Ryzen Threadripper Models

AMD, which announced its Ryzen Threadripper HEDT processor at its 2017 Computex show, closely followed by certain motherboard manufacturers' unveiling of their compatible AMD X399 chipset motherboards; is readying nine SKUs based on the dual "Summit Ridge" MCM. This includes 10-core (3+2+3+2), 12-core (3+3+3+3), 14-core (4+3+4+3), and 16-core (4+4+4+4) models, all of which have SMT enabled, resulting in 20, 24, 28, and 32 threads, respectively; full 64-lane PCI-Express gen 3.0 root-complexes; and full quad-channel DDR4 memory interfaces. Some of these models with the "X" brand extension feature XFR (extended frequency range), which adds 200 MHz to the boost clock, if the cooling is sufficient.

The lineup is led by the 16-core/32-thread Ryzen Threadripper 1998X, with a healthy clock speed of 3.50 GHz, and 3.90 GHz boost, a TDP of 155W, and XFR. This is closely followed by the 16-core/32-thread 1998, clocked lower, at 3.20 GHz with 3.60 GHz boost, 155W TDP, and lack of XFR. The 16-core chips are followed by 14-core models. The 14-core/28-thread Ryzen Threadripper 1977X ships with 3.50 GHz core clock speed, but 4.00 GHz boost, XFR, and the same 155W TDP as the 16-core parts. This is closely followed by the 14-core/28-thread 1977 (non-X), with lower clocks of 3.20 GHz core, 3.70 GHz boost, and again, the same 155W TDP.
AMD could trounce Intel's HEDT lineup in terms of TDP from its 12-core lineup and below. The 12-core/24-thread Ryzen Threadripper 1976X ships with a staggering 3.60 GHz core, and 4.10 GHz boost, XFR, and "only" 125W TDP. In comparison, everything 6-core thru 10-core in Intel's Skylake-X HEDT lineup is 140W. The next 12-core/24-thread Threadripper part is the 1956X with 3.20 GHz core, 3.80 GHz boost, XFR, and 125W TDP. Its smaller sibling, the 1956 (non-X), ships with 3.00 GHz core, 3.70 GHz boost, and no XFR, but the same 125W TDP.

We now move on to AMD's 10-core/20-thread lineup. The Ryzen Threadripper 1955X ships with 3.60 GHz core and 4.00 GHz boost, and XFR adding further to the boost clock. The 1955 (non-X) will be the cheapest Threadripper you can buy. This 10-core/20-thread chip is clocked at 3.10 GHz, with 3.70 GHz boost. Both 10-core parts have their TDP rated at 125W.

The company didn't disclose cache structure, or pricing. We expect the 10-core Threadripper models to take on Intel's 4-thru-6-core "Kaby Lake-X" and "Skylake-X" parts; the 12-core Threadripper on Intel's 8-thru-10 core parts, the 14-core Threadripper on Intel's 10-thru-12 core parts; and the 16-core Threadripper, bolstered by its high clock speeds, on Intel's 16-thru-18-core parts.Source: OCaholic.ch
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73 Comments on AMD Readies Nine Ryzen Threadripper Models

#1
Steevo
Is it possible we have only seen the bottom of the barrel "Summit Ridge" silicon, the better being saved for MCM threadrippers?
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#2
FR@NK
Hopefully details on pricing surfaces soon.
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#3
xkm1948
If they carry over the socket to 2nd gen Threadripper then I am sold.
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#4
saikamaldoss
Maybe AMD should revisit XFR smart core and make it OC just 2 core instead if 6 or 7 depending on cooling. Then may be threadripper can clock just 2 cores to 4.3 or 4.5ghz.. I was under the impression that my 1800x's xfr just overclocks one core to 4.1 and I was surprised seeing the results I got from my CPU...
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#5
claylomax
It might sound like the title of a Judas Priest album, but I have to say that AMD nailed it with the name: Threadripper.
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#6
natr0n
It's like you expect a trickle and they give you a flood.
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#7
Camm
saikamaldoss said:
Maybe AMD should revisit XFR smart core and make it OC just 2 core instead if 6 or 7 depending on cooling. Then may be threadripper can clock just 2 cores to 4.3 or 4.5ghz.. I was under the impression that my 1800x's xfr just overclocks one core to 4.1 and I was surprised seeing the results I got from my CPU...
AMD's mhz ceiling is mostly because of process rather than architecture. We won't see improvements to the ceiling unless AMD moves off LPP to something power orientated.

Don't count on it though unless AMD starts rolling in money anytime soon.
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#8
pky
The 12-core/24-thread Ryzen Threadripper 1976X ships with a staggering 3.60 GHz core, and 4.10 GHz boost, XFR, and "only" 125W TDP.
4.1GHz boost and 200MHz XFR = 4.3GHz... that's pretty hardcore for Zen.
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#9
RejZoR
Steevo said:
Is it possible we have only seen the bottom of the barrel "Summit Ridge" silicon, the better being saved for MCM threadrippers?
Well, was that really so unexpected? When you have tons of cores, you need better binned chips. You think Intel is not doing that?
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#10
robert3892
FR@NK said:
Hopefully details on pricing surfaces soon.
yes we really need pricing. I hope AMD will announce this soon
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#11
pky
We expect the 10-core Threadripper models to take on Intel's 4-thru-6-core "Kaby Lake-X" and "Skylake-X" parts
It's quite unlikely that they would sell a 10-core Threadripper for less than the 8-core 1800X... I wouldn't expect them below $600, so they wouldn't really be competing with the KL-X and 6-core Sky-X. But they could fill the gap between the 8- and 10-core Sky-X quite well with 10-, 12- and possibly 14-core Threadrippers (it is quite a big gap). The 16-cores would probably be around $1300-1400.
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#12
Camm
pky said:
It's quite unlikely that they would sell a 10-core Threadripper for less than the 8-core 1800X... I wouldn't expect them below $600, so they wouldn't really be competing with the KL-X and 6-core Sky-X. But they could fill the gap between the 8- and 10-core Sky-X quite well with 10-, 12- and possibly 14-core Threadrippers (it is quite a big gap). The 16-cores would probably be around $1300-1400.
I actually think we will actually see these pretty compressed price wise. Reason being is look at the disabled core structure and the fact that Intel all the way up to its 12 core chips are single bus designs. AMD's going to have issues with cache latency hurting performance (esp. in comparison to Intel) much like it does in desktop sockets.

Considering Threadripper keeps seeming to be hyped for more the gaming, and less the workstation market, I could see the 16c part assuming the mantle of the old Intel $999 halo chip, with other chips compressing in the $500 gap between it and Ryzen 1800X.
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#14
Melvis
saikamaldoss said:
Maybe AMD should revisit XFR smart core and make it OC just 2 core instead if 6 or 7 depending on cooling. Then may be threadripper can clock just 2 cores to 4.3 or 4.5ghz.. I was under the impression that my 1800x's xfr just overclocks one core to 4.1 and I was surprised seeing the results I got from my CPU...
I think you might have that slightly wrong, Im pretty sure what your seeing is still only 1 core at 4.1GHz XFR Boost its just that it bounces around from core to core which then in HW Monitor records it. What you need to look at is the first list under "value" as you run a benchmark/game whatever and then watch how many cores at once is clocked up to 4.1GHz and im pretty sure it will only be 1 core at a time doing so but it will jump around from core to core. :)
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#15
R0H1T
Camm said:
I actually think we will actually see these pretty compressed price wise. Reason being is look at the disabled core structure and the fact that Intel all the way up to its 12 core chips are single bus designs. AMD's going to have issues with cache latency hurting performance (esp. in comparison to Intel) much like it does in desktop sockets.

Considering Threadripper keeps seeming to be hyped for more the gaming, and less the workstation market, I could see the 16c part assuming the mantle of the old Intel $999 halo chip, with other chips compressing in the $500 gap between it and Ryzen 1800X.
If anything it's the opposite, TR is supposed to be for prosumers, with its many cores (remember SKLx was never shown up to 18 cores till last week) & 64x PCIe lanes. If the top chips also have a high base clock, plus SKLx skimps with the cheapo TIM, then AMD will have a field day in this segment because of better thermals & higher clock speeds. Although SKLx should have higher IPC.
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#16
Mussels
Moderprator
with the same ~4GHz clockspeeds, if the pricing isnt much different between the platforms there might be a lot of cores in my future
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#17
Harry Lloyd
Threadripper is one of the greatest product names I have ever heard. And I love the numeration, reminds me of the 20th century.
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#18
Vayra86
Steevo said:
Is it possible we have only seen the bottom of the barrel "Summit Ridge" silicon, the better being saved for MCM threadrippers?
Unlikely, as the top end XFR clocks of Ryzen haven't changed abit. Still 4.0 - 4.1.

Threadripper is just a couple of Ryzen dies fused together, so this explains why the clocks can stay similar to lower core count Ryzen parts. That being said, it still is an impressive design and even more impressive to maintain these clocks with these core counts.
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#19
Live OR Die
I wonder how it will go clock to clock against intels CPUs i guess it would be around the same as Ryzen 7 which is pretty much the same clock as a intel 5960x.
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#20
atomicus
Ryzen Threadripper 1955X 10-core will be how much we think? It would seem to be inferred here that it will be FAR less than the $1000 which Intel are asking for their 10-core i9-7900X? If the 1955X is, as this article states, taking on Intel's 4-thru-6-core CPU's in pricing ($250-400), then why the hell would you EVER buy Intel at this price point??
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#21
Melvis
The 12core is indeed going to be an interesting beast and might be the CPU to get on this platform for the $$$ to performance ratio.
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#22
springs113
Melvis said:
The 12core is indeed going to be an interesting beast and might be the CPU to get on this platform for the $$$ to performance ratio.
Yup, if priced right...day one for me. I think the 10 core is going to be $500(takes the 1800x slot) and this 12 core maybe $200 more. The problem is the board. There's just so much excitement surrounding x399 that I think choosing a board will be hard. I know I'm looking at the Taichi/Fatality/Zenith...same as my Ryzen thoughts except the fatality which was subbed by the Xpower.

Ryzen was only the start of something good. Threadripper and X299 is of what to come(competition) is O' so sweet. Now AMD needs to kick Hynix in their behinds cause Vega dropping the ball. All I have to say on that front is that it better be worth the wait.
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#24
Cybrnook2002
Maybe Claw Hammer would have been more fitting :-) hehe

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#25
Gasaraki
pky said:
It's quite unlikely that they would sell a 10-core Threadripper for less than the 8-core 1800X... I wouldn't expect them below $600, so they wouldn't really be competing with the KL-X and 6-core Sky-X. But they could fill the gap between the 8- and 10-core Sky-X quite well with 10-, 12- and possibly 14-core Threadrippers (it is quite a big gap). The 16-cores would probably be around $1300-1400.
Agreed
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