Thursday, June 29th 2017

AMD Announces Ryzen PRO Desktop Processors

We have included the full AMD presentation deck at the end, so be sure to load the entire story.

Following the global excitement generated by the launch of its new EPYC family of server processors, AMD (NASDAQ: AMD) today added another tier to its enterprise CPU portfolio with the introduction of AMD Ryzen PRO desktop processors. Designed to meet the demands of today's compute-intensive workplace, Ryzen PRO desktop processors will bring reliability, security, and performance to enterprise desktops worldwide.

"Today marks another important step in our journey to bring innovation and excitement back to the PC industry: the launch of our Ryzen PRO desktop CPUs that will bring disruptive levels of performance to the premium commercial market," said Jim Anderson, senior vice president and general manager, Computing and Graphics Group, AMD. "Offering a significant leap in generational performance, leadership multi-threaded performance, and the first-ever 8-core,16-thread CPU for commercial-grade PCs, Ryzen PRO provides a portfolio of technology choices that meet the evolving needs of businesses today and tomorrow." Ryzen PRO Lineup Delivering breakthrough responsiveness for the most demanding enterprise-class applications and multi-tasking workflows, the 'Zen' core in every Ryzen PRO processor provides up to 52 percent improvement in compute capability over the previous generation, and the Ryzen 7 PRO 1700 offers up to 62 percent more multi-threaded performance than select competing solutions.


Security
Targeted for enterprise and public sector implementations, Ryzen PRO processors offer state-of-the-art silicon-level security, providing hardware-based cryptographic and security technologies to help protect against an ever-growing number of threats. Security standards like secure boot, fTPM (firmware Trust Platform Module), AES, and Windows 10 Enterprise security features are fully supported across the entire Ryzen PRO processor family.

Dependability
Built upon exceptional AMD product dependability and sourced from wafers with the highest yields, Ryzen PRO processors provide commercial-grade quality and reliability to help ensure platform longevity for future-ready computing. Industry-leading, open-standard DASH manageability allows for CPU-agnostic administration and helps ensure businesses avoid getting locked into proprietary solutions.

Availability
The world's largest suppliers of commercial client desktops are expected to provide Ryzen PRO-based PCs to businesses worldwide in the second half of 2017. Ryzen PRO mobile is scheduled for the first half of 2018.
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43 Comments on AMD Announces Ryzen PRO Desktop Processors

#1
bug
I don't see what's "pro" about these. They look like relabeled Ryzens.
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#2
P4-630
I still think it's pretty impressive having 8 core/16 thread CPU's with just 65 Watts TDP.
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#3
dozenfury
"disruptive"...not sure why every presentation in 2017 needs to include that word. In fact anymore when I see that word in a presentation I assume BS.
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#4
bug
dozenfury
"disruptive"...not sure why every presentation in 2017 needs to include that word. In fact anymore when I see that word in a presentation I assume BS.
At least this year AMD "disrupted" Intel from their complacency ;)
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#5
dj-electric
dozenfury
"disruptive"...not sure why every presentation in 2017 needs to include that word. In fact anymore when I see that word in a presentation I assume BS.
X299 today is a living proof of AMD's disrupness
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#6
noti5see
One more choice to the Ryzen series of CPU. Good.
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#7
peche
Thermaltake fanboy
bug
I don't see what's "pro" about these. They look like relabeled Ryzens.
AMD being 'AMD there.... like the beginning of "Radeon R" series video cards, just older 7XXX series being rebranded and a bit unlocked....
bug
At least this year AMD "disrupted" Intel from their complacency ;)
at least amd came up with something interesting... after 4 years of FX crap.....well played indeed !

Regards,
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#8
W1zzard
dozenfury
"disruptive"...not sure why every presentation in 2017 needs to include that word. In fact anymore when I see that word in a presentation I assume BS.
Me too
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#9
Duality92
So what does the "PRO" actually add from the regular?
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#10
yotano211
I just did a disruptive in the toilet some minutes ago.
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#11
bug
Duality92
So what does the "PRO" actually add from the regular?
It's all explained on Anandtech. Basically, nothing that could be useful at home.
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#12
VSG
Editor, Reviews & News
Duality92
So what does the "PRO" actually add from the regular?
Ryzen 3 is the most important thing to note here.
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#13
jabbadap
Are these things apu's or why they are compared to igpu intels and not igpuless xeon E3s?
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#14
Steevo
bug
I don't see what's "pro" about these. They look like relabeled Ryzens.
They have the same ARM embedded crypto processor that Eypc has, so while a unencrypted system you could get a rootkit that read RAM contents and running software... encrypted at hardware level means they should be secure from anything trying to read or accessing running processes or will only get random garbage out.
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#15
Duality92
useless for >99% if the people on these forums basically.
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#16
Gasaraki
WTF are these? They are the same processors. I hate AMD marketing sometimes... actually all the time.

They still don't have IGP. I'm pretty sure work machines need a IGP like Intel ones do.
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#17
W1zzard
Steevo
They have the same ARM embedded crypto processor that Eypc has, so while a unencrypted system you could get a rootkit that read RAM contents and running software... encrypted at hardware level means they should be secure from anything trying to read or accessing running processes or will only get random garbage out.
What you describe applies only to virtual machines. Check our Epyc architecture article for details.
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#18
Steevo
W1zzard
What you describe applies only to virtual machines. Check our Epyc architecture article for details.
I read it, and know you are much more in the know about this, but it reads "On-board secure memory encryption (SME) enables a single key to encrypt system memory, including that on virtual machines or containers, thus protecting against physical memory attacks. When your servers are located in a datacenter, you might not be able to protect against people physically messing with your machine, hooking up some equipment to read the contents of the memory modules. SME is fully transparent and requires no OS or driver support." so with no OS requirement and the same hardware used in a workstation could you not run a native OS in SME mode without a hypervisor, providing the same level or security from rootkits or other malware? I guess the "includes VM" part leads me to believe that VM and hypervisor is not part of the prerequisite, but again, I don't know that as a fact, but only as an assumption.

Thanks.
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#19
W1zzard
You can enable memory encryption for the whole system, without running virtual machines. However, any application running on the system will have the memory it requests transparently decrypted. So anything running as admin, which includes rootkits, will be able to access all pages, unencrypted. In this state the encryption only helps against people walking up to your machine, attaching equipment and reading out ram contents.
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#20
Aenra
Assuming all of these features can be disabled (major assumption, but just for the sake of the argument), would we see any clock benefit using one? This "better silicon quality" part.. not sure if it means what ignorant me thinks it means?
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#21
Steevo
Disappointing that they didn't include a preboot trusted environment that allows a admin to check what is running hardware level to ensure a clean machine. I was expecting this to be more of a hardware encryption plus trusted application list to prevent espionage in things like voting machines, defense contractors, and other high security systems, sandboxing applications until they are approved to access other data.
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#22
dj-electric
What im asking is where is the non-pro Ryzen 3
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#23
Konceptz
AMD's answer to Intel V-Pro...nice
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#24
Swamp Monster
So this could be B2 stepping models that was leaked recently.
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#25
Hugh Mungus
Swamp Monster
So this could be B2 stepping models that was leaked recently.
Maybe, but ryzen pro just has a coprocessor for safety and reliability or something. That alone is enough to make ryzen pro a lower end xeon competitor.

Ryzen 3 is looking pretty good, btw! I know many people with very limited budgets that have bought a 1050 ti for example thst still run really old AMD APU's and cpu's. A g4560 isn't really adequate for anythibg other than gaming and web surfing, so they want at least a 4-core and most prefer buying new. At the right price with the right mobo, ryzen 3 is a pretty sweet deal for those people! Hopefully the 1200 is less than a 100 euros and the 1300 max 110. The budget gamers often deserve a decent upgrade the most.
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