Tuesday, November 21st 2017

ADATA Releases the XPG STORM RGB M.2 2280 Active-Cooled Heatsink

ADATA Technology, a leading manufacturer of high performance DRAM modules and NAND Flash products, today launched the XPG STORM heatsink add-on for M.2 2280 drives. STORM features an aluminum heatsink and with a fan. It can be easily affixed to any compatible SSD to provide powerful cooling. Lower SSD temperatures promote more stable storage and system performance, in addition to the XPG-styled STORM heatsink with its colorful RGB lighting contributing to attractive, gaming-themed PC setups.

Lower temperatures complement high speeds
While M.2 2280 PCIe SSDs are currently the fastest on the market, their high data rates also mean considerable heat buildup. Without a heatsink, accumulating heat can compromise performance and accelerate SSD aging. STORM includes an aluminum heatsink that fits on any M.2 SSD without causing overhead issues. Together with the heatsink, STORM uses a fan to circulate cool air and reduces temperature by at least 25% when compared with bare M.2 SSDs.
RGB style brings out the best in SSDs
STORM includes RGB lighting elements that are sure to be appreciated by case modders and PC DIY enthusiasts. While the M.2 slot is usually almost hidden among other, larger components on the motherboard, with its RGB heatsink STORM indeed stands out. It comes with default RGB lighting modes and also supports several apps, such as ASUS AURA Sync, Gigabyte RGB Fusion Ready, and MSI Mystic Light Sync, for maximum convenience and customizability.

Easy installation on any compatible drive
Thanks to pre-applied thermal compound, STORM can be quickly placed on any M.2 2280 SSD or card. No screws or complicated procedures required, and no BIOS adjustments needed. Once in place, STORM begins to do its work lowering temperatures and improving storage and system stability.
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16 Comments on ADATA Releases the XPG STORM RGB M.2 2280 Active-Cooled Heatsink

#2
lZKoce
That is so awesome. I wanna DIY project now. MOAR geekiness :D Bring back reactor core. :)

And some idea under the hood:



Mine M.2 is sandwiched between the CPU socket and the GPU . When using AIO, temp of the SSD is 50 degrees with everyday use. Switched to a tiny a TT cooler and temp dropped to 38 degrees from the side airflow of the cooler. ( also everything around the CPU socket is happier :))

Posted on Reply
#3
SortOfGrim
In my experience tiny fans are very loud, and also that thing is bulky af.
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#4
silapakorn
I'm starting to wonder that do we really need that high speed from M.2 SSD, especially when such speed comes with a catch like additional heat?

I have gone through 2 SATA SSDs so far and the reason I bought a new one is mainly because the old one is too small, not because it's too slow. 500 mb/s is more than enough for my daily use, plus I've never seen any heat issues in SATA SSDs. Do switching to M.2 really worth the trouble?
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#5
Vayra86
silapakorn said:
I'm starting to wonder that do we really need that high speed from M.2 SSD, especially when such speed comes with a catch like additional heat?

I have gone through 2 SATA SSDs so far and the reason I bought a new one is mainly because the old one is too small, not because it's too slow. 500 mb/s is more than enough for my daily use, plus I've never seen any heat issues in SATA SSDs. Do switching to M.2 really worth the trouble?
I agree, for mainstream use M2 has no tangible benefits, only added risk and drawbacks.
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#6
kabarsa
silapakorn said:
I'm starting to wonder that do we really need that high speed from M.2 SSD, especially when such speed comes with a catch like additional heat?

I have gone through 2 SATA SSDs so far and the reason I bought a new one is mainly because the old one is too small, not because it's too slow. 500 mb/s is more than enough for my daily use, plus I've never seen any heat issues in SATA SSDs. Do switching to M.2 really worth the trouble?
Agree. Speed is not the problem now. I wish consumer SSD devices provided better price/space and more endurance
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#7
plåtburken
I always wanted more RGB stuff on my components, can't wait for RGB transistors, capacitors and more!
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#8
Hood
silapakorn said:
I'm starting to wonder that do we really need that high speed from M.2 SSD, especially when such speed comes with a catch like additional heat?

I have gone through 2 SATA SSDs so far and the reason I bought a new one is mainly because the old one is too small, not because it's too slow. 500 mb/s is more than enough for my daily use, plus I've never seen any heat issues in SATA SSDs. Do switching to M.2 really worth the trouble?
Actually, they are worth the "trouble". The heat issue rarely comes into play except in laptops/tablets (where this heatsink won't even fit), and even then only during long sustained writes at high speed (very rare). This heatsink is a joke, more about looks than anything else.
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#9
Crustybeaver
plåtburken said:
I always wanted more RGB stuff on my components, can't wait for RGB transistors, capacitors and more!
RGB transistors would look amazing, make it happen!
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#10
zlobby
EKWB's own NGFF thermal shield is not compatible with X370 Taichi. This one looks like a viable alternative.
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#11
ZeDestructor
So... ummm... about that U.2 form factor that you can very helpfully be placed right in the airflow of intake/exhaust fans... completely pointless form factor, amirite?
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#12
Rauelius
Well, this will be a problem for boards that have the M.2 slot right under the Graphics card. Otherwise, I wish this was available before I finished my system. I would have bought this.
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#13
jsfitz54
Wires, where are the wires? How does the fan spin and receive a power source? Bus powered? No mention no picture.
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#14
Totally
SortOfGrim said:
In my experience tiny fans are very loud, and also that thing is bulky af.
Ditto, I also hope that this isn't the beginning of a descent down a slippery slope by having manufacterers realize that it's easier to just slap on better cooling solution than develop faster cooler-running ICs. Hopefully we don't get to the point where a fan dying takes your M.2 SSD with it.
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#15
cucker tarlson
lZKoce said:
That is so awesome. I wanna DIY project now. MOAR geekiness :D Bring back reactor core. :)

And some idea under the hood:



Mine M.2 is sandwiched between the CPU socket and the GPU . When using AIO, temp of the SSD is 50 degrees with everyday use. Switched to a tiny a TT cooler and temp dropped to 38 degrees from the side airflow of the cooler. ( also everything around the CPU socket is happier :))


but that's SATA3 m.2 drive, not PCI-E m.2
no wonder it doesn't heat up as much.
Posted on Reply
#16
ZeDestructor
jsfitz54 said:
Wires, where are the wires? How does the fan spin and receive a power source? Bus powered? No mention no picture.
It's ~wireless~

More likely: it's been 'shopped out of the promo pics.
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