Wednesday, May 30th 2018

Samsung Announces 10 nm-Class DDR4 SO-DIMMs for Gaming Notebooks

Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., the world leader in advanced memory technology, today announced that it has started mass producing the industry's first 32-gigabyte (GB) double data rate 4 (DDR4) memory for gaming laptops in the widely used format of small outline dual in-line memory modules (SoDIMMs). The new SoDIMMs are based on 10-nanometer (nm)-class process technology that will allow users to enjoy enriched PC-grade computer games on the go, with significantly more capacity, higher speeds and lower energy consumption.

Using the new memory solution, PC manufacturers can build faster top-of-the-line gaming-oriented laptops with longer battery life at capacities exceeding conventional mobile workstations, while maintaining existing PC configurations. "Samsung's 32GB DDR4 DRAM modules will deliver gaming experiences on laptops more powerful and immersive than ever before," said Sewon Chun, senior vice president of memory marketing at Samsung Electronics. "We will continue to provide the most advanced DRAM portfolios with enhanced speed and capacity for all key market segments including premium laptops and desktops."
Compared to Samsung's 16GB SoDIMM based on 20nm-class 8-gigabit (Gb) DDR4, which was introduced in 2014, the new 32GB module doubles the capacity while being 11 percent faster and approximately 39 percent more energy efficient.

With a total of 16 of Samsung's newest 16-gigabit (Gb) DDR4 DRAM chips (eight chips each mounted on the front and back), the 32GB SoDIMM allows gaming laptops to reach speeds up to 2,666 megabits-per-second (Mbps).

A 64GB laptop configured with two 32GB DDR4 modules consumes less than 4.6 watts (W) in active mode and less than 1.4W when idle. This reduces power usage by approximately 39 percent and over 25 percent, respectively, compared to today's leading gaming-oriented laptops, which are equipped with 16GB modules.

Samsung has begun to aggressively expand its offering of the industry's largest 10nm-class DRAM lineup (16Gb LPDDR4, 16Gb GDDR5 and 16Gb DDR4), which will usher in a new era of 16Gb DRAM in the mobile, graphics, PC and server segments, and subsequently in other markets such as supercomputers and automotive systems.
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12 Comments on Samsung Announces 10 nm-Class DDR4 SO-DIMMs for Gaming Notebooks

#2
R0H1T
Sammy has been making 1Xnm RAM for a while now, they've probably just renamed it to 10nm class to make it sound more awesome.
Posted on Reply
#3
bug
PC manufacturers can build faster top-of-the-line gaming-oriented laptops with longer battery life at capacities exceeding conventional mobile workstations...
Never in my life have I seen a situation where adding more RAM has prolonged the battery life.
Posted on Reply
#4
dj-electric
"bug said:
Never in my life have I seen a situation where adding more RAM has prolonged the battery life.
Less power per GB by using denser, smaller chips
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#5
Patriot
"bug said:
Never in my life have I seen a situation where adding more RAM has prolonged the battery life.
"dj-electric said:
Less power per GB by using denser, smaller chips
Yes, Welcome to the future. It's the same way we have higher core counts on lesser TDP's.
Posted on Reply
#6
bug
"dj-electric said:
Less power per GB by using denser, smaller chips
Less power maybe. But it would need to be less than half to double the capacity and decrease TDP at the same time.
I'm going to look these modules up, but right now I'm at work.
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#7
trparky
The words "gaming" and "notebook" are two words that should never exist in the same sentence.
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#8
Hood
"trparky said:
The words "gaming" and "notebook" are two words that should never exist in the same sentence.
Unfortunately, we have an entire generation of people who believe that desktop computers are not even an option. Even several middle aged people I know insist on buying one laptop after another, even though they don't really like them, because "I don't want to be tied to a desk". Blame it on "smart" phones; they ruined everything else, why not desktop gaming?

"bug said:
Never in my life have I seen a situation where adding more RAM has prolonged the battery life.
Never in my life have I seen a marketing department fail to make up stuff about their products, to boost sales.
Posted on Reply
#9
trparky
"Hood said:
we have an entire generation of people who believe that desktop computers are not even an option.
Hey, if they want to waste money having to buy a new notebook every year then so be it. Meanwhile all I need to do is buy a new video card and put it into my current build which is far cheaper than having to buy a whole new system. You know what they say right? A fool and his/her money are soon parted.
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#10
Pure Wop
"trparky said:
Hey, if they want to waste money having to buy a new notebook every year then so be it. Meanwhile all I need to do is buy a new video card and put it into my current build which is far cheaper than having to buy a whole new system. You know what they say right? A fool and his/her money are soon parted.
People have different styles and preferences. Like how are you going to game in your friend's or at the airport with your desktop?
Also many people simply don't care about some $2000 every like 1-2 years. Be careful calling them fool: some of them are actually the smarter ones to earn more and easily afford it.
Posted on Reply
#11
trparky
I just can't see spending that kind of cash when desktop components are upgradable and not only that but are faster (sometimes twice as fast) due to not having the cooling capacity issues that notebooks inherently have.

Desktop processors can clock as high as 4.5 GHz but if you try that in a notebook the thing will be on fire.
Posted on Reply
#12
Pure Wop
"trparky said:
I just can't see spending that kind of cash when desktop components are upgradable and not only that but are faster (sometimes twice as fast) due to not having the cooling capacity issues that notebooks inherently have.

Desktop processors can clock as high as 4.5 GHz but if you try that in a notebook the thing will be on fire.
Again that's just down to personal preferences. I enjoy Battlefield 1 @ 3440*1440 120Hz Gsync, something not possible on a laptop. However I also find CS Go or Dota 2 at friend's pretty fun. In that case I can't care less about 4.5GHz CPU, or twice as fast GPU, or whatever.
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