Wednesday, May 8th 2019

ASUS Also Outs ROG Strix B365-F Gaming Motherboard

In quick succession to last week's launch of the ROG Strix B365-G Gaming, ASUS rolled out its first ROG-branded ATX motherboard based on Intel B365 Express chipset, the ROG Strix B365-F Gaming. Supporting all 9th and 8th generation Core processors out of the box, this board is targeted at gamers who don't intend to overclock their CPUs or need memory clock speeds above DDR4-2667. The board draws power from a combination of 24-pin ATX and 8-pin EPS connectors, conditioning it for the CPU with a 10-phase VRM. The board supports up to 64 GB of dual-channel DDR4 memory capped at 2667 MHz.

Expansion includes one PCI-Express 3.0 x16 slot with metal reinforcement wired to the CPU, a PCI-Express 3.0 x4 (physical x16) slot wired to the B365 PCH, three PCIe x1, and an M.2 E-key slot for WLAN cards. Storage connectivity includes two M.2 slots each with PCI-Express 3.0 x4 wiring, one of which even has SATA 6 Gbps wiring; and six SATA 6 Gbps ports. USB connectivity includes two 10 Gbps USB 3.1 Gen 2 ports at the rear panel, and six 5 Gbps USB 3.0 ports, four on the rear panel, two by header. The onboard audio solution is premium ROG SupremeFX, combining a Realtek ALC1220A CODEC with dual high-impedance headphones amplifiers, audio-grade capacitors, and ground-layer isolation. The board's sole 1 GbE interface is pulled by the ubiquitous Intel i219-V controller. Expect this board to be priced around $120.
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7 Comments on ASUS Also Outs ROG Strix B365-F Gaming Motherboard

#1
Manu_PT
Why would someone pay 120€ for a B36x motherboard that has no overclocking capabilities on both CPU and RAM, when you can get one for 70€? Or even better, for 100€ an entry level Z370 that lets you overclock ram up to 3600mhz easily. Makes no sense to me.
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#2
tigger
I'm the only one
Manu_PT said:
Why would someone pay 120€ for a B36x motherboard that has no overclocking capabilities on both CPU and RAM, when you can get one for 70€? Or even better, for 100€ an entry level Z370 that lets you overclock ram up to 3600mhz easily. Makes no sense to me.
Some people do not overclock, it is still a good board for them people.
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#3
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
B365's Achilles' heel isn't lack of CPU OC. It's the memory clock limit of 2667 MHz that's too low by 2019 standards (it was acceptable in 2016-17).
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#4
EarthDog
btarunr said:

B365's Achilles' heel isn't lack of CPU OC. It's the memory clock limit of 2667 MHz that's too low by 2019 standards (it was acceptable in 2016-17).
That's JEDEC....just the platform spec. Certainly it can go higher on other chipsets but the difference in performance isnt much (AMD ryzen will respond more than intel though).

https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/Intel/Core_i7_8700K_Coffee_Lake_Memory_Performance_Benchmark_Analysis/10.html

If a 9900k was used, would that change these results?


EDIT: Also, how was last weeks board the first ROG B365 based board and this one is too? Those first two sentences need to be updated.
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#5
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
EarthDog said:



EDIT: Also, how was last weeks board the first ROG B365 based board and this one is too? Those first two sentences need to be updated.
This is the first ROG-branded ATX motherboard based on B365. Last week's was Strix-G (mATX).
Posted on Reply
#6
EarthDog
btarunr said:

B365's Achilles' heel isn't lack of CPU OC. It's the memory clock limit of 2667 MHz that's too low by 2019 standards (it was acceptable in 2016-17).
Thank you.. I thought i had deleted that as I realized it just after I posted it and re-read it, ha! :toast:
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#7
Tsukiyomi91
for those who want a good looking board that has a ton of connectors & features but don't want to spend >$200 for premium boards, this is probably the answer.
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