Monday, January 20th 2020

Intel "Panther Canyon" NUC Implements "Tiger Lake" SoC with Xe Graphics

Intel NUC 11 Extreme is the spiritual successor to the "Hades Canyon" and "Skull Canyon" NUC, and implements the company's next-generation 10 nm+ "Tiger Lake" processor. Codenamed "Panther Canyon," the NUC 11 Extreme represents a line of ultra-compact desktops with serious computing power, bringing together the company's highest-performance CPU cores and iGPUs. The "Tiger Lake-U" SoC powering the NUC 11 Extreme will reportedly be configured with a 28-Watt TDP, and will come in Core i3, Core i5, and Core i7 variants.

The "Tiger Lake-U" processor is expected to combine next-generation "Willow Cove" CPU cores with an iGPU based on Intel's new Xe graphics architecture, in what could be the first commercial outing for both. The NUC 11 Extreme "Panther Canyon" will also support up to 64 GB of dual-channel DDR4-3200 memory over SO-DIMMs, an M.2-2280 slot with PCI-Express 4.0 x4 and SATA 6 Gbps wiring, and option for Intel Optane M10 cache memory. On the connectivity front, and Intel AX-201 WLAN card provides 802.11ax Wi-Fi 6, and Bluetooth 5. A 2.5 GbE wired interface will also be available. These will also be among the first NUCs to feature front- and rear-Thunderbolt ports (possibly next-gen 80 Gbps given that the platform implements PCIe gen 4.0). The NUC 11 Extreme "Panther Canyon" is expected to launch some time in the second half of 2020.
Source: FanlessTech
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11 Comments on Intel "Panther Canyon" NUC Implements "Tiger Lake" SoC with Xe Graphics

#1
Animalpak
Intel NUC 11 Extreme will be pretty expensive
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#2
atomicus
What do people use these for? Always been curious as never quite envisaged needing one myself. More just for super ease of portability?
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#3
IceShroom
Which core does the new Tiger Lake CPU will be using?? Same Sunny Cove core as Ice Lake??
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#4
neatfeatguy
atomicus
What do people use these for? Always been curious as never quite envisaged needing one myself. More just for super ease of portability?
One place I worked for they used NUCs to run their digital menu boards. Little compact computer they'd mount to the back of the monitors. Worked well enough unless the monitors were mounted poorly by being recessed into the walls and the NUCs would choke and overheat. Any failed NUC required us to issue out a 3rd party tech to a business to troubleshoot and that was a nightmare half the time if the tech sucked.....

Otherwise the wife's aunt and uncle, they like having these NUCs because they take up so little space in their home offices (since majority of their work is from home) - just set it on the desk next to their monitor, plug in the mouse/keyboard, monitor and ethernet cable. Though, they're not in need of a top-end NUC, just one to run Windows so they can run their inventory software for work, play videos and general web browsing/office software.
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#5
londiste
IceShroom
Which core does the new Tiger Lake CPU will be using?? Same Sunny Cove core as Ice Lake??
Willow Cove
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#7
TheLostSwede
atomicus
What do people use these for? Always been curious as never quite envisaged needing one myself. More just for super ease of portability?
Installed a Gigabyte Brix on the back of an LCD screen at my parents. No more big box collecting dust on the floor. It's more than powerful for what it's being used for. Going to upgrade the SSD in it next month, as at the time SSDs were still quite expensive.

I guess it's used instead of AIO PCs in s lot of places, as these things are easier to service and swap out if something breaks.
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#8
icey
atomicus
What do people use these for? Always been curious as never quite envisaged needing one myself. More just for super ease of portability?
A lot of Google videoconferencing hardware for small meeting rooms and phone booths makes use of devices like these strapped to the back of monitors, running specially modified Chrome OS systems. Also things like video walls, signage, etc.

They're also good for office and general purpose web browsing machines if you dont need tons of storage or GPU power
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#9
notb
atomicus
What do people use these for? Always been curious as never quite envisaged needing one myself. More just for super ease of portability?
NUCs in general - for many things, some mentioned above.

This kind of high-end devices with decent graphics - for gaming mostly (as console or laptop alternative) And I'm not sure people actually use them. It's more like Intel wants to sell them with that idea.

But honestly, at some point it'll just start to make sense. We already know incoming high-end consoles will be huge. This will compete with the smaller variants.
Of course they're somehow expensive, but you get a proper Windows system and access to whatever collection of PC games you have.
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#10
TheGuruStud
Now, you too, can own a laptop without a screen for the same price (or actually a lot more since I bet you can get a decent vid card in latop for same cost)!
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#11
Peter1986C
Laptops are still sold in higher volumes than NUCs that is why the price is comparatively high. A lot of people do buy either just for space saving etc. though and not necessarily for mobility (when going for a laptop) so if these grow in popularity the price diff might get fixed.
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