Monday, March 16th 2020

Complete Hardware Specs Sheet of Xbox Series X Revealed

Microsoft just put out of the complete hardware specs-sheet of its next-generation Xbox Series X entertainment system. The list of hardware can go toe to toe with any modern gaming desktop, and even at its production scale, we're not sure if Microsoft can break-even at around $500, possibly counting on game and DLC sales to recover some of the costs and turn a profit. To begin with the semi-custom SoC at the heart of the beast, Microsoft partnered with AMD to deploy its current-generation "Zen 2" x86-64 CPU cores. Microsoft confirmed that the SoC will be built on the 7 nm "enhanced" process (very likely TSMC N7P). Its die-size is 360.45 mm².

The chip packs 8 "Zen 2" cores, with SMT enabling 16 logical processors, a humongous step up from the 8-core "Jaguar enhanced" CPU driving the Xbox One X. CPU clock speeds are somewhat vague. It points to 3.80 GHz nominal and 3.66 GHz with SMT enabled. Perhaps the console can toggle SMT somehow (possibly depending on whether a game requests it). There's no word on the CPU's cache sizes.
The graphics processor is another key component of the SoC given its lofty design goal of being able to game at 4K UHD with real-time ray-tracing. This GPU is based on AMD's upcoming RDNA2 graphics architecture, which is a step up from "Navi" (RDNA), in featuring real-time ray-tracing hardware optimized for DXR 1.1 and support for variable-rate shading (VRS). The GPU features 52 compute units (3,328 stream processors provided each CU has 64 stream processors in RDNA2). The GPU ticks at an engine clock speed of up to 1825 MHz, and has a peak compute throughput of 12 TFLOPs (not counting CPU). The display engine supports resolutions of up to 8K, even though the console's own performance targets at 4K at 60 frames per second, and up to 120 FPS. Variable refresh-rate is supported.

The memory subsystem is similar to what we reported earlier today - a 320-bit GDDR6 memory interface holding 16 GB of memory (mixed chip densities). It's becoming clear that Microsoft isn't implementing a hUMA common memory pool approach. 10 GB of the 16 GB runs at 560 GB/s bandwidth, while 6 GB of it runs at 336 GB/s. Storage is another area that's receiving big hardware uplifts: the Xbox Series X features a 1 TB NVMe SSD with 2400 MB/s peak sequential transfer rate, and an option for an additional 1 TB NVMe storage through an expansion module. External storage devices are supported, too, over 10 Gbps USB 3.2 gen 2. The console is confirmed to feature a Blu-ray drive that supports 4K UHD Blu-ray playback. All these hardware specs combine toward what Microsoft calls the "Xbox Velocity Architecture." Microsoft is also working toward improving the input latency of its game controllers.
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128 Comments on Complete Hardware Specs Sheet of Xbox Series X Revealed

#51
Valantar
HD64G
Smart marketing can change the perspective of what a console can become with the next-gen ones. And then, the $600 monster will seem VERY cheap for what it will offer.
Nah, I don't think so. As was mentioned above, a console is a gaming appliance. Appliances for mass markets have rather strict entry points. And $600 with no games included has previously proven to be too steep for mass market adoption. And people's disposable income hasn't increased much since then. I would say $300 is the sweet spot for consoles, with $400 being a good launch price and $500 being acceptable if (and only if) it's a batshit crazy aspirational purchase with some real X-factor. $600 will be effectively DOA, as you'd never get the volume off the ground to being prices down or reach critical mass to make the related services really good.
ARF
Expect this to be a hot (pun intended) box, and noisy if it has some fans to chill it down a bit.

At N7 node, that performance needs wattage.
As @TheLostSwede said above, a single large (and thick, looks like 35-40mm) fan on top pulling air out. Almost an ideal cooling layout, should perform well. And that heatsink is huge too.
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#52
TheLostSwede
Valantar
As @TheLostSwede said above, a single large (and thick, looks like 35-40mm) fan on top pulling air out. Almost an ideal cooling layout, should perform well. And that heatsink is huge too.
It's a 130mm fan, but yeah, it looks really thick too.
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#53
Valantar
TheLostSwede
It's a 130mm fan, but yeah, it looks really thick too.
Hm, 130mm is interesting. Though my first thought when I saw the layout was "here come the Noctua fan swaps!" I have no doubt they will be attempted no matter the size.
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#54
Od1sseas
milewski1015
It's stated that the GPU is based on the upcoming RDNA2 architecture - of course it's going to be an improvement over the current RDNA architecture.



So because something doesn't support RT - a feature only supported by a small list of games that severely decreases performance for what is, in my opinion, a barely noticeable visual difference - that makes it a paperweight?
"Barely makes a difference". Lmfao. People said same shit like that when tessellation first appeared and now look how important it is for games to look realistic. Educate yourself. Ray Tracing is the future and the difference is noticable.
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#55
ARF
Od1sseas
"Barely makes a difference". Lmfao. People said same shit like that when tessellation first appeared and now look how important it is for games to look realistic. Educate yourself. Ray Tracing is the future and the difference is noticable.
Games are not designed to look photo-realistic in the first place. This alone cancels out the whole idea of using ray-tracing in gaming development. Another reason is the exponential need for hardware resources for effects which can be simulated and similar effects achieved using the old rasterization rendering.
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#56
dirtyferret
HD64G
Smart marketing can change the perspective of what a console can become with the next-gen ones. And then, the $600 monster will seem VERY cheap for what it will offer.
Marketing might help choosing an xbox over a ps5 or vice versa but it won't be putting $600 into the wallet of people who can't afford it.
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#57
Od1sseas
ARF
Games are not designed to look photo-realistic in the first place. This alone cancels out the whole idea of using ray-tracing in gaming development. Another reason is the exponential need for hardware resources for effects which can be simulated and similar effects achieved using the old rasterization rendering.
Screen Space effects are not even close to Ray Tracing , they is no way they can be simulated using Rasterization. Reflections is one example.
Games are designed to be photorealistic otherwise we would have stuck at 1990 graphics with 2 polygons max
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#58
ARF
Od1sseas
Screen Space effects are not even close to Ray Tracing , they is no way they can be simulated using Rasterization. Reflections is one example.
Games are designed to be photorealistic otherwise we would have stuck at 1990 graphics with 2 polygons max
You don't need ray-tracing. See following NFS images:


[MEDIA=twitter]1002013665963393024[/MEDIA]


[MEDIA=twitter]860150800605212672[/MEDIA]
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#59
X828
Thought AMD had the contract for both Xbox and Playstation...... did that change? If not... all of you saying you "look forward to seeing what the PS5 has to offer" look no further than the specs in this article. Same specs, different shell.
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#60
iO
ARF
You don't need ray-tracing. See following NFS images:




[MEDIA=twitter]860150800605212672[/MEDIA]
Horrible example of "RT is useless" if SSR can't draw any reflections of the cars underbody...
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#61
HD64G
dirtyferret
Marketing might help choosing an xbox over a ps5 or vice versa but it won't be putting $600 into the wallet of people who can't afford it.
Who is talking about forcing people to bleed their wallet to get anything just for fun? We are talking about people with enough money to buy a PC with $1500 or prefer a $600 console that performs at least equally.

Something techy after watching videos about the XBOX's APU specs: If that 52CU GPU allows for constant 1.8GHz for less than 150W (simple assumption as with another 50W the APU will reach 200W in total which is a sensible limit) while possibly matching 2080 Super performance, the RDNA2 efficiency will be a great breakthrough in compute efficiency in general. My 5c.
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#62
MxPhenom 216
ASIC Engineer
ARF
You don't need ray-tracing. See following NFS images:


[MEDIA=twitter]1002013665963393024[/MEDIA]


[MEDIA=twitter]860150800605212672[/MEDIA]
Ray tracing is so much more than just reflections you nitwits. Saying oh we don't need this tech (something that could significantly advance graphics in the future) is someone advocating for mediocrity. Ray tracing is the closest we are to simulating the behavior of lights in an environment. Screen space effects aren't doing that at all.

Hell just the shadow improvements alone in the new CoD is enough to keep me interested in where this could go and hope hardware ray tracing becomes a standard.
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#63
Od1sseas
ARF
You don't need ray-tracing. See following NFS images:


[MEDIA=twitter]1002013665963393024[/MEDIA]


[MEDIA=twitter]860150800605212672[/MEDIA]
Are you trolling me right now? Do you even know how Screen Space Reflections work?
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#64
Darmok N Jalad
FordGT90Concept
Ohhhhh, I think I see it: the 192-bit chips share bandwidth with the CPU where the 128-bit chips are dedicated.

GPU is effectively 10 GiB at 128-bit and CPU is effectively 6 GiB at 64-bit.
You know, this is what I was thinking. There's no reason to believe the memory is all shared--maybe they found it easier to design this way, or to have better performance results. Maybe one memory controller can't rule them all in this case.
Posted on Reply
#65
ARF
MxPhenom 216
Ray tracing is so much more than just reflections you nitwits. Saying oh we don't need this tech (something that could significantly advance graphics in the future) is someone advocating for mediocrity. Ray tracing is the closest we are to simulating the behavior of lights in an environment. Screen space effects aren't doing that at all.

Hell just the shadow improvements alone in the new CoD is enough to keep me interested in where this could go and hope hardware ray tracing becomes a standard.
The problem is that you need a hell lot of transistors which you currently can't access because you are stuck at N7 process. With the further nodes not promising too much advancement.

You need quantum computing for ray-tracing to have real value in reality.
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#66
gamefoo21
X828
Thought AMD had the contract for both Xbox and Playstation...... did that change? If not... all of you saying you "look forward to seeing what the PS5 has to offer" look no further than the specs in this article. Same specs, different shell.
AMD does, but they basically build the CPU and GPU and all that to MS and Sony's requests.

Look at the PS4 Pro vs One X. One vs PS4.
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#67
Chloe Price
Personally I can't even tell between two gameplay videos is there RT on or not. Not the best invention after sliced bread IMO. I see more difference between high and ultra settings in a game.
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#68
TheGuruStud
HwGeek
I hope MS wil let us use Win10 on it, so we could play or use it as a PC["Desktop Console" ].
I will buy it at first day if so.
How's that going to work? You would NEVER be able to install anything that isn't from their store...so basically nothing useful. Windows is too broken to be exposed.

You could run a copy virtualized, but then you're just increasing complexity to nincompoops. It'll be infected by the end of day 1 and lead to angry customers that wouldn't know how to press a reset button if you stapled it to their forehead. And eating storage space, and a hundred dumb things only the general population could conjure.

K.I.S.S.
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#69
Darmok N Jalad
TheGuruStud
How's that going to work? You would NEVER be able to install anything that isn't from their store...so basically nothing useful. Windows is too broken to be exposed.

You could run a copy virtualized, but then you're just increasing complexity to nincompoops. It'll be infected by the end of day 1 and lead to angry customers that wouldn't know how to press a reset button if you stapled it to their forehead. And eating storage space, and a hundred dumb things only the general population could conjure.

K.I.S.S.
It might be fun if they could take the same hardware, put it in a different case, throw in native controller support, have it just run Windows 10, and call it a Surface Desktop or something. Of course, if they did that, they might diminish people's desire to just go buy an Xbox, but it would make for a pretty powerful PC.
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#70
Makaveli
ppn
560GBs 10GB gpu optimal memory, only problem is the cpu will eat alot of that 10GB-5,5=4,5GB, 560-336=224, so the GPU is left with 4,5GB at 224GBs.

How about NO, and gives us HBM2E 32GB 1TBs, 5nm maxed to 420mm2 GPU only, and separate 60mm2 8 core ZEN3 with separate DDR5 24GB, or forget about it.
Lmao and give me a million dollars.

The console you want would cost $1000-1500 dollars.

At least make the request reasonable.
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#71
notb
dirtyferret
$500 xbox console with PS5 coming in at $450+, it will take two years before there is any significant market penetration
Maybe it's a totally new strategy? Building up the lineup instead of replacing?
I mean: if new games work on both Xbox One and Series, there's really no need to replace what they have. They're offering a new model above those existing - with prices shifting over time to make room for another gen.
It's almost exactly what Sony does in cameras (unlike most competition). They launch a top model, but keep making the earlier ones for few years, so eventually they have a full lineup.
We could see more frequent launches as well (a single top model every 2-3 years).
HD64G
Smart marketing can change the perspective of what a console can become with the next-gen ones. And then, the $600 monster will seem VERY cheap for what it will offer.
Sure, but that would move consoles from cheap "gaming for everybody" to a more high-end market. Less volume, probably less games. Higher margin.

Maybe smartphones are eating into the casual, mass-market gaming - like they did with PCs and cameras. I don't know. But in those markets we've seen the (potentially) exact same reaction: focus on a high-end, high-paying client.
MxPhenom 216
Well I'm an engineer so I do consider it. Even if you dont have it, i can't help my brain.
You're an engineer. Is that a pick-up line? Hilarious.
Super XP
What price is the XBOX Series X going to sell for? I don't see a price associated with it at the moment. And you cannot compare a console based system with a actual computer, in terms of cost. As the Consoles cost to make is a lot cheaper.
I don't understand the comparing part. The fact that these consoles are expensive to make leaked a long time ago. It's not official, but it's pretty much as certain as the specs at this point.
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#72
Super XP
X828
Thought AMD had the contract for both Xbox and Playstation...... did that change? If not... all of you saying you "look forward to seeing what the PS5 has to offer" look no further than the specs in this article. Same specs, different shell.
Different specs different shell both powered by AMD.
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#73
notb
ARF
You don't need ray-tracing. See following NFS images:
These renders are purely atrocious. Is this really 2018? :D

BMW: shadow under car, when body illumination suggests that most light comes from the side.
3 cars: front light reflections don't line up with the lamps. This likely means the cars are modeled as boxes for lighting interaction with environment. That's miles away from ray tracing.

But you're right: we don't need RTRT.
And I understand you completely because when 3D games started to become popular I was just as unconvinced as you are now. I kept playing 2D/isometric games. The first time I had fun in 3D was in 2003 when I tried Morrowind.
Frankly, sometime around 2007 I decided I don't need games at all. :D
TheGuruStud
How's that going to work? You would NEVER be able to install anything that isn't from their store...so basically nothing useful. Windows is too broken to be exposed.
Well, actually Xbox - like Windows 10 Pro and up - runs on Hyper-V. And Windows Store provides you with linux images. So if Microsoft opened access to the hypervisor, that would open some serious possibilities.

Sure, if this was made public, people would start wrecking their Xboxes.
But what if MS created an "Xbox Store" with productivity apps run in containers?
Your Xbox could become a NAS, a database server, a general VM engine.
Think about Synology Store and their VM Manager: https://www.synology.com/en-global/dsm/feature/virtual_machine_manager
There's absolutely no technical reason why Xbox could offer that. And it's perfectly stable and robust.

But generally speaking - your Xbox could really become a computing backend for multiple scenarios.
This could be nicely packed in the Windows ecosystem and cloud/edge/distributed computing idea that's already taking over.
We already get "Accelerate with cloud" buttons. We could just as well get some "Accelerate using Xbox"
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#74
ratirt
Ray tracing again? Guys, Full ray tracing with all it really should do is not happening for few years at least. If you wanted to fully ray trance games like Metro Exodus you would need 3 2080Ti's tied together in a perfectly working environment to get that 60FPS in 4K. Even though we have some of it we are not there yet. Fools errand RT is at this point.

Anyway.
Is there any information about when the PS5 specs are going to be out? I'd like to compare the two and decide which one will be mine :D
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#75
Tsukiyomi91
This is the first time that consoles actually closes the gap with the PC. it's not like consoles is gonna decimate the PC market space anytime soon or it's going to destroy Nvidia's RTX series of GPUs just because next gen consoles have RT baked into the SoC. I see this as something to look forward to than rejecting/hating it outright.
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