Tuesday, November 10th 2020

EK Launches QuantumX Delta TEC Water Block Featuring Intel Cryo Cooling Technology

EK, the leading computer cooling solutions provider, announces the release of their EK-QuantumX Delta TEC water block. With more than 15 years of experience as a leader of premium quality cooling solutions, EK, in collaboration with Intel, has developed a next-level solution for enthusiasts seeking consistent thermal performance and enhanced overclocking on unlocked 10th Gen Intel Core desktop processors.

"Since the start of EK, our goal was to create innovative and viable solutions for gaming and PC enthusiasts," said Edvard König, Founder of EK. "I am proud to merge the consistent and proven performance of the EK Quantum cooling engine with Intel's sub-ambient cooling technology to achieve the best computing and gaming experience imaginable." The EK-QuantumX Delta TEC is exclusively powered by Intel Cryo Cooling Technology, a unique combination of hardware, software, and firmware designed to help unleash elite performance for gamers and overclockers.
"We are proud to have worked closely with Intel to bring the EK-QuantumX Delta TEC to market," said Kat Silberstein, CEO Americas, EK. "One of EK's core strengths is the ability to cultivate and grow strategic alliances with global silicon players. These alliances make it possible to leverage each other's unique core strengths, bringing the best innovative solutions to market.

EK-QuantumX Delta TEC is built using a purpose-designed large surface flow-through cooling engine together with Intel Cryo Cooling Technology, bridging aesthetic uniformity and near-silent operations with technological advancements in thermal solutions. The cooler is an exceptional application of cooling the CPU with sub-ambient temperatures by utilizing a Thermoelectric Cooler (TEC) plate while continuously monitoring and adjusting temperatures dynamically, achieving an ideal operating environment for sustained gaming performance.

Liquid coolers are unable to reach temperatures below ambient (room) temperature, but the EK-QuantumX Delta TEC is cutting-edge, as it actively cools the CPU to sub-ambient temperatures while extracting and dissipating the heat generated from the TEC plate through the traditional liquid cooling loop.

The EK-QuantumX Delta TEC utilizes an innovative two-pronged approach to mitigate thermal condensation, a byproduct that has plagued previous attempts of sub-ambient cooling. The cooler features a compact integrated insulation shroud that isolates all exposed cold surfaces from the environmental conditions inside the PC, while the Intel Cryo Cooling Technology continuously monitors and adapts to those conditions to minimize condensation risk generated by the cooling process.

"Gamers and overclockers constantly push the envelope to get the absolute most performance they can out of their desktops," said Brandt Guttridge, General Manager of Intel's Desktop & Workstation Platform Marketing Group. "By introducing Intel Cryo Cooling Technology, and by collaborating with fellow technology leaders like EK, we're taking thermal innovation to the next level to help meet the needs of this audience."

Availability and Pricing
The EK-QuantumX Delta TEC is available for pre-order through the EK Webshop or EK Partner Reseller Network for €349.90 (inc. VAT). It is expected to ship out in early December.
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43 Comments on EK Launches QuantumX Delta TEC Water Block Featuring Intel Cryo Cooling Technology

#1
W1zzard
Does anyone see how they can avoid condensation inside the socket with this approach?

Power spec would be interesting, too.
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#2
the54thvoid
W1zzardDoes anyone see how they can avoid condensation inside the socket with this approach?

Power spec would be interesting, too.
That base looks to be rubber, I guess to seal the socket. Perhaps the system is designed to monitor external temps to minimise differential? If the outside is 25 degrees and the internal shroud maintains 24 degrees, that's sub-ambient and too similar to cause condensation. Swimming pool halls work in the same way, the air handlers need to keep the air temp within a few degrees of the water temp. Just my guess?

As for the power, there's that eight pin molex connector?
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#3
TheLostSwede
Is this what we're to expect to need for future Intel CPUs?
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#4
ebivan
Why not put the thermal electric component into (or next to) the radiator with a separate fan on hot side instead of directly onto the cpu socket? Its much easier to keep water temp just 1 or 2 deg above room temp, and would avoid risking condensation at the heart of the system.

Power consumption doesn't matter too much, whoever is crazy enough to overlock an Intel Gen10, which needs 300+W on its own, won't care about power anyways.
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#5
Enzarch
W1zzardPower spec would be interesting, too.
EK says 200W max
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#6
ebivan
TheLostSwedeIs this what we're to expect to need for future Intel CPUs?
Future Intel CPUs with 14++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ and 6GHz at 2,4 kW will come with their own barrel of liquid nitrogen...
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#7
Chaitanya
Here is a look at both TEC offerings available exclusively for Intel CPUs.


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#8
the54thvoid
ChaitanyaHere is a look at both TEC offerings available exclusively for Intel CPUs.


I was right-ish. At 7 minutes, he mentions 'dew point' when condensation will occur. The TEC cooler monitors the differential between ambient and coolplate.
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#9
Haile Selassie
Welcome back to year 2000, Intel and EK. Welcome.

While there, take a look at Peltier-Seebeck and Rankine as well as Carnot cycle textbooks and try to remember why TEC application is limited to what it is.
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#10
Devon68
Just read an article on Guru 3D on Cooler master releasing a AIO with the same TEC technology for the same price. It seems that this will be a big thing among the youtubers soon. I like the concept but dont really need that much cooling for my parts. Maybe one day.
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#11
ebivan
Guys, these things cost 350 bucks and use 200W, before getting that, just get a Ryzen 5950, or the next HEDT CPU or any Server CPU or a dual socket mainboard, any of those options which will give you more power (well more threads, not more single threat performance)...
This is just stupid...
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#12
Vya Domus
Oh man these are not good news. Now I finally get it why Intel is also going with a big.LITTLE architecture, their power figures must be horrendous going forward.
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#13
lynx29
the54thvoidThat base looks to be rubber, I guess to seal the socket. Perhaps the system is designed to monitor external temps to minimise differential? If the outside is 25 degrees and the internal shroud maintains 24 degrees, that's sub-ambient and too similar to cause condensation. Swimming pool halls work in the same way, the air handlers need to keep the air temp within a few degrees of the water temp. Just my guess?

As for the power, there's that four pin molex connector?
if you watch Liunustechtips new video, he removes the rubber before installing it.
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#15
Vya Domus
W1zzardDoes anyone see how they can avoid condensation inside the socket with this approach?
Only way to do it is to regulate the temperature such that it stays above ambient, problem is systems that have to do with heat transfer and temperatures are notorious for being incredibly difficult to control accurately because of the time it takes from the moment a command is applied and the system starts to respond.

Or, they just try and insulate around the coldpate as much as possible in hopes that the area which is in actual contact never reaches below ambient, which is dumb.
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#16
AnarchoPrimitiv
I bet Intel had their hand in this because rocket lake is going to be ungodly hot and insanely power hungry
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#17
X71200
the54thvoidAs for the power, there's that four pin molex connector?
It has an 8-pin PCI-E on it, so I'm thinking that would be the delivery. Molex has a lower max power threshold than PCI-E, given the previous and current news power ratings of the peltier - it's probably using PCI-E. Otherwise, the unit would likely be even less efficient.

Given the price and seeing that mounting mechanism which reminds me of my EK blocks (with TEC on, might be harder to mount), added to the over all poorness of the idea, this product is DOA in my book. I was thinking they would ditch it during the concept design phase, but they did it.
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#18
TechLurker
I want one. For my old FX-9590. The heat the combined rig will output will make for a great garage warmer this coming winter.
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#19
the54thvoid
X71200It has an 8-pin PCI-E on it, so I'm thinking that would be the delivery. Molex has a lower max power threshold than PCI-E, given the previous and current news power ratings of the peltier - it's probably using PCI-E. Otherwise, the unit would likely be even less efficient.

Given the price and seeing that mounting mechanism which reminds me of my EK blocks (with TEC on, might be harder to mount), added to the over all poorness of the idea, this product is DOA in my book. I was thinking they would ditch it during the concept design phase, but they did it.
My mistake. Old eyes and brain not collaborating.
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#20
Haile Selassie
X71200I was thinking they would ditch it during the concept design phase, but they did it.
Ditto. 180-200W TEC with a pumping capacity of 100W on a good day with all stars aligned... good luck trying to run anything remotely well threaded and watch this notoriously inneficient heat pump suffocate.
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#21
Manoa
LOL 200W cooling the cpu alone, im cooling 5 computers and 2 video cards with 25W, are they serius ?? 350 euro ? imagine what you can buy with that... you could probably buy a normal water cooling system for this money.... you could probably run a compressor for this amount of power ... this is mega LOL
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#22
Haile Selassie
ManoaLOL 200W cooling the cpu alone, im cooling 5 computers and 2 video cards with 25W, are they serius ?? 350 euro ? imagine what you can buy with that... you could probably buy a normal water cooling system for this money.... you could probably run a compressor for this amount of power ... this is mega LOL
This is not 200W cooling power, this is 200W heat pumping power. Cooling power is about 100W!
You need to dissipate 200W PLUS whatever the power draw (300W+) of your cooled components is through the radiators.
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#23
zlobby
Now that's pure and top kek! :roll:
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#24
Nephilim666
Should come with a tube of dielectric grease for filling the socket and destroying resale on your system.

Edit: oh and a can of conformal spray too!

Next minute there will be an intel-co-developed vapochill. Since we're driving back into the 90's at Intel.
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#25
R0H1T
So up to 200W for the cooler & 300W for CPU, nice going Intel & LTT. Any reason why you would want to push that stupid envelope which was torn apart way back in 2004? This isn't the noughties & 10GHz chips aren't coming anytime soon, shame on Linus for promoting this egregious waste of money & energy on what 0.5% more fps :shadedshu:
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