Tuesday, January 12th 2021

AMD Announces Ryzen 5000 Series Mobile Processors, Additional Ryzen Desktop Models, and Ryzen Threadripper PRO Availability for Consumers

Today, AMD (NASDAQ: AMD) announced the full portfolio of AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Mobile Processors, bringing the highly-efficient and extremely powerful "Zen 3" core architecture to the laptop market. New AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Mobile Processors provide unprecedented levels of performance and incredible battery life for gamers, creators, and professionals. New laptops powered by Ryzen 5000 Series Mobile processors will be available from major PC manufacturers including ASUS, HP and Lenovo, starting in Q1 2021. Expanding its leadership client computing product portfolio featuring the "Zen 3" core, AMD also announced the AMD Ryzen PRO 5000 Series Mobile Processors, delivering enterprise-grade security and seamless manageability to commercial users. Throughout the course of 2021, AMD expects a broad portfolio of more than 150 consumer and commercial notebooks based on the Ryzen 5000 Series Mobile Processors.

"As the PC becomes an even more essential part of how we work, play and connect, users demand more performance, security and connectivity," said Saeid Moshkelani, senior vice president and general manager, Client business unit, AMD. "The new AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Desktop and Mobile Processors bring the best innovation AMD has to offer to consumers and professionals as we continue our commitment to delivering best-in-class experiences with instant responsiveness, incredible battery life and fantastic designs. With our PC partners, we are delivering top-quality performance and no-compromise solutions alongside our record-breaking growth in the notebook and desktop space in the previous year."
AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Mobile Processors
Building upon the previous generation of leadership mobile processors, the Ryzen 5000 Series includes high-performance H- and ultra-mobile U-Series processors. At the top of the product stack, AMD Ryzen 5000 H-Series Mobile Processors deliver impressive gaming experiences by combining unmatched performance with outstanding battery life, featuring up to 8 cores and 16 threads and built on the new AMD "Zen 3" architecture.

Topping out the mobile processor offering, the HX Series processors provide gamers and creators with elite-level performance while HS processors bring the power of H-Series in thinner and lighter form factors. The new AMD Ryzen 9 5980HX processor is capable of up to 23% increased single-threaded performance and up to 17% faster multi-threaded performance over the previous generation making it the ideal solution for gaming and creator notebooks.

For mainstream consumers looking for performance on-the-go, the AMD Ryzen 5000 U-Series Mobile Processors offer the perfect blend of performance and efficiency. The new AMD Ryzen 7 5800U processor offers:
  • Up to 16% more single-threaded performance and up to 14% faster multithreaded performance over the previous generation
  • Up to an incredible 17.5 hours of general usage battery life and up to 21 hours of movie playback on a single charge
Product Specification: AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Mobile Processors
Available in the first half of 2021, the Ryzen PRO 5000 Series Mobile Processors provide new levels of productivity and collaboration along with seamless manageability to meet the ever-shifting demands of modern work environments. The Ryzen PRO 5000 Series Mobile Processors also offer enterprise-level security features with innovative layers of defense at the silicon, OS and platform levels, giving IT teams confidence their PCs have protection, no matter where their workforce is stationed.

AMD Ryzen Desktop Processors
AMD is also announcing reduced-TDP alternatives to the award-winning AMD Ryzen 9 5900X and AMD Ryzen 7 5800X desktop processors, coming to pre-built OEM systems only. Powered by the new "Zen 3" core architecture and with a lower 65 W TDP, the Ryzen 9 5900 desktop processor offers an average of 24% faster 1080p gaming across select titles compared to the prior generation.
Product Specification: AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Desktop Processors
Additionally, AMD Ryzen Threadripper PRO Processors will now be directly available to consumers through participating global retailers, e-tailers and system integrators with on-shelf availability expected in March 2021. Ryzen Threadripper PRO Processors offer an unmatched feature set to workstation customers with up to 64 cores, 8 channels of memory, RDIMM and LRDIMM support, 128 PCIe Gen 4 lanes, and AMD PRO security technologies.
Product Specification: AMD Ryzen Threadripper PRO
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19 Comments on AMD Announces Ryzen 5000 Series Mobile Processors, Additional Ryzen Desktop Models, and Ryzen Threadripper PRO Availability for Consumers

#1
Durvelle27
The Ryzen 9 for mobile should have been scraped unless they were 12C variants

With how they have it setup there are way to many 8C/16T CPUs that all have the same specs other than Clocks and TDP
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#2
Patr!ck
interesting PRO lineup.
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#3
evernessince
Still no 5700X. AMD is doing a good job at burning any good will it's earned over the years by pricing well. Hopefully Intel's next release is good.
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#4
dragontamer5788
Durvelle27
The Ryzen 9 for mobile should have been scraped unless they were 12C variants

With how they have it setup there are way to many 8C/16T CPUs that all have the same specs other than Clocks and TDP
Laptop OEMs are targeting 15W, 25W, and 45W. Or Ultraportable (Thin-and-light), Standard Laptop, and Dekstop Replacements.

They're probably all the same chips, but by making new SKUs, we know that they've been "binned" for a particular segment. The same chip that's been manufactured will have different leakage, different GHz limits, different power-consumption. That's just the nature of manufacturing: its impossible to make the "same chip". There's always a degree of manufacturing variance.

Its confusing for sure, but these aren't parts for hobbyists to pick out from. OEMs should be smart enough to pick out the right bin for their purpose.
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#5
PanicLake
Ryzen 5900 and 5800 OEM only? That is quite disappointing.
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#6
dragontamer5788
PanicLake
Ryzen 5900 and 5800 OEM only? That is quite disappointing.
AMD's weakness is relying upon TSMC, which is absolutely being overloaded with orders. There's pretty much nothing AMD can do to improve the production, since its fabless.

That's where Intel has an advantage... at least from a business side. With so many computers being sold due to the Pandemic, Intel will probably hit record profits even though its 14nm / 10nm chips are technologically inferior to TSMC 7nm and 5nm. Kind of sad to see this happen..

But AMD isn't "losing". AMD is selling out all of the chips it makes. But AMD just can't really increase production and take advantage of current economic conditions and "win harder".
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#7
ViperXTR
Aw man, 5800 oem only? I still hope for a 65w tdp 8 core retail zen3 cpu
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#8
Caring1
I'm waiting for a 5xxG series.
Bring it on.
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#9
Gmr_Chick
evernessince
Still no 5700X. AMD is doing a good job at burning any good will it's earned over the years by pricing well. Hopefully Intel's next release is good.
Seriously! Also, no 5600 non X. There REALLY needs to be a 5600 in order to balance the 5600X price tag. I mean, I can't be the only one who wouldn't pay $300 for a 6 core part, right? Especially when previous generations of the 6 SKU didn't cost that much...
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#10
ViperXTR
Caring1
I'm waiting for a 5xxG series.
Bring it on.
Ryzen 7 5700G hmmm
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#11
Durvelle27
Gmr_Chick
Seriously! Also, no 5600 non X. There REALLY needs to be a 5600 in order to balance the 5600X price tag. I mean, I can't be the only one who wouldn't pay $300 for a 6 core part, right? Especially when previous generations of the 6 SKU didn't cost that much...
I mean I did

mans if we are looking at price and performance

the 3600X launched at $249 and the 5600X $299, that’s a $50 increase for a almost 20% IPC increase

that’s more than justified in my book
Posted on Reply
#12
Gmr_Chick
Durvelle27
I mean I did

mans if we are looking at price and performance

the 3600X launched at $249 and the 5600X $299, that’s a $50 increase for a almost 20% IPC increase

that’s more than justified in my book
Yeah...you make a good point. I'll see myself out, lol :laugh:
Posted on Reply
#13
evernessince
Durvelle27
I mean I did

mans if we are looking at price and performance

the 3600X launched at $249 and the 5600X $299, that’s a $50 increase for a almost 20% IPC increase

that’s more than justified in my book
That's a bad comparison in the first place. The 3600X was never good value to begin with. The 3600 was by far the more popular model and for all intents and purposes had the same performance. In reality you are paying 50% more ($200 vs $300) for 20% extra performance. I wouldn't compare the 3800X's price to the 5800X to justify the price either. This is a lot like saying the MSRP of Ampere is good. No, it's just good in comparison to the absolutely terrible Turing. In reality Ampere is power hungry with a mediocre performance uplift and has less VRAM at the same price than cards launched almost 4 years ago.

Mind you that's assuming you can get the 5600X at MSRP. We are apparently far from general availability still.
Posted on Reply
#14
Durvelle27
evernessince
That's a bad comparison in the first place. The 3600X was never good value to begin with. The 3600 was by far the more popular model and for all intents and purposes had the same performance. In reality you are paying 50% more for 20% extra performance. I wouldn't compare the 3800X's price to the 5800X to justify the price either. You are falling right into AMD's trap, when in reality they've withheld all the good value products from their lineup. This is a lot like saying the MSRP of Ampere is good. No, it's just good in comparison to the absolutely terrible Turing. In reality Ampere is power hungry with a mediocre performance uplift and has less VRAM at the same price than cards launched almost 4 years ago.
That argument still falls flat

The direct comparison will always be directly X vs X. And in this case the 5600X beats every last gen CPU in single threaded apps and just about matches last gens 8 Core in multithreaded apps. So yes you see a 25% price increase but the trade off is you get much better performance than last gen. Price to performance can get no better than that

if you want to split hairs the 3700X launched at $329 vs the 5600X at $299 but yet the 5600X offers better performance. So which is the better value
Posted on Reply
#15
evernessince
Durvelle27
That argument still falls flat

The direct comparison will always be directly X vs X. And in this case the 5600X beats every last gen CPU in single threaded apps and just about beats last gens 8 Core in multithreaded apps. So yes you see a 25% price increase but the trade off is you get much better performance than last gen upto the 8 core variant. Price to performance can get no better than that

if you want to split hairs the 3700X launched at $329 vs the 5600X at $299 but yet the 5600X offers better performance. So which is the better value
"
It's time we finally check out the Ryzen 5 5600X, the most affordable Ryzen 5000 series processor announced to date. Positioned as a mainstream part, it’s coming in at $300, a 20% premium over the Ryzen 5 3600X. However this third-gen processor already didn’t make sense as it cost 25% more than the R5 3600 and offered little extra performance.


Therefore, most opted for the $200 Ryzen 5 3600, which is what we widely recommended in the past year as the best value CPU, and that’s the part we’ll be comparing the 5600X to today.
"
www.techspot.com/review/2135-amd-ryzen-5600x/

No, the argument that it must be compared to the 3600X falls flat. A terrible value CPU that offers a mere 1.3% over the 3600. Clearly reviews around the web support my position on this.

Second, the 5600X is only 7.7% faster at 1080p gaming:

www.techpowerup.com/review/amd-ryzen-5-5600x/22.html

The margin is 16.6% for desktop applications. 20% is not a performance increase the 5600X has over the 3600, let alone the 3600X.
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#16
Mastakony
PanicLake
Ryzen 5900 and 5800 OEM only? That is quite disappointing.
Like 3900 last year...
Not a surprise
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#17
watzupken
evernessince
Still no 5700X. AMD is doing a good job at burning any good will it's earned over the years by pricing well. Hopefully Intel's next release is good.
5700X is basically the 5800 non X version now. No point releasing a confusing 8c/16t SKU again like they did with the Zen 2. The existance of the 3700X basically made the 3800X redundant.
Posted on Reply
#18
evernessince
watzupken
5700X is basically the 5800 non X version now. No point releasing a confusing 8c/16t SKU again like they did with the Zen 2. The existance of the 3700X basically made the 3800X redundant.
The problem with that is AMD just announced the 5800 non-x as OEM only. Can't replace a consumer part with an OEM part consumers don't have access to.

Either AMD is planning a 5700X for the consumer market or their cheapest 8 core CPU will be the 5800X, in which case I'll likely be switching to Intel if their next gen CPUs aren't a dud.
Posted on Reply
#19
PanicLake
Mastakony
Like 3900 last year...
Not a surprise
But we had the 3700x... right now we don't have a 5700x... that could easily be represented by the 5800...
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