Wednesday, February 9th 2022

Adobe Premiere Pro 22.2 Update Brings HEVC 10-Bit Encoding with Major Performance Increase for NVIDIA and Intel Graphics Cards

Adobe's Premiere Pro, one of the most common video editing tools in the industry, has received a February update today with version 22.2. The new version brings a wide array of features like Adobe Remix, an advanced audio retiming tool. Alongside that, the latest update accelerates offline text-to-speech capabilities by as much as three times. However, this is not the most significant feature, as we are about to see. Adobe also enabled 10-bit 420 HDR HEVC H/W encoding on Window with Intel and NVIDIA graphics. This feature allows the software to use advanced hardware built-in the NVIDIA Quadro RTX and Intel Iris Xe graphics cards.

The company managed to run some preliminary tests, and you can see the charts below. They significantly improve export times with the latest 22.2 software version that enables HEVC 10-Bit hardware encoding. For Intel GPUs, no special drivers need to be installed. However, for NVIDIA GPUs, Adobe is advising official Studio drivers in combination with Quadro RTX GPUs.
Sources: Adobe, via VideoCardz
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19 Comments on Adobe Premiere Pro 22.2 Update Brings HEVC 10-Bit Encoding with Major Performance Increase for NVIDIA and Intel Graphics Cards

#1
Baum
what? No AMD Support :-/

GGPU came a long way and failed here again.

Is there something missing on other GPU's not use them vor "HEVC" "software" Codec to run on a "graphic card" ?

:-/
Posted on Reply
#2
Vya Domus
BaumGGPU came a long way and failed here again.
This doesn't really have anything to do with that.
Posted on Reply
#3
EatingDirt
z1n0xAlways Major Delays. Instead of investing in hiring, R&D, boosting the supply chain, AMD did $1.8 billion in stock buybacks.
A company can do all those things at the same time, and they did. They aren't mutually exclusive. You can look at their quarterly financials to see it. Operating Expenses up 39% Y/Y.

Also, AMD R&D has nothing to do with Adobe not supporting 10-bit HVEC on AMD GPU's.
Posted on Reply
#4
windwhirl
EatingDirtAlso, AMD R&D has nothing to do with Adobe not supporting 10-bit HVEC on AMD GPU's.
Indeed. As far as I know, anyone can code a library to use the integrated video encoding hardware found in AMD GPUs. Or even use a third-party one, there are some already and have been around for quite some time.

It's all on Adobe to built the feature in or not.
Posted on Reply
#5
Chaitanya
windwhirlIndeed. As far as I know, anyone can code a library to use the integrated video encoding hardware found in AMD GPUs. Or even use a third-party one, there are some already and have been around for quite some time.

It's all on Adobe to built the feature in or not.
Just like Dell, Adobe is Intel's lapdog. Until recently they were neglecting nVidia GPUs as well.
Posted on Reply
#6
ir_cow
I've been waiting for Adobe to step up their game for years now. Its a little late. HEVC GPU support has been teased for 5+ years. 2020 beta didn't really work. Just a black video after encoding. I honestly gave up on Adobe encoding efforts. Export it as uncompressed now and encode it elsewhere.

Everyone I know switched to DaVinci Resolve. One time buy (for pro or free for base) and is overall better. With WORKING GPU encoding :)

The only thing Adobe has going is the monopoly on the graphics design industry. Its really nice to drop illustrators files directly into After Effects with realtime updstes. Take that AE file and use it in premiere. Can be a godsend sometimes.
Posted on Reply
#7
john_
AMD keeps failing in software support. I believe Adobe contacted AMD the same way it does business with Nvidia and Intel.
If not, then someone should question how a company that now has a valuation close to 150 billions, can't find a way to communicate with one of the major software companies. AMD's valuation is not 2-3 billions like a few years ago.
Posted on Reply
#8
windwhirl
This is Adobe's fault. If they feel lazy, they can even grab some third-party encoder with support for AMD's HW encoder.
john_AMD keeps failing in software support. I believe Adobe contacted AMD the same way it does business with Nvidia and Intel.
If not, then someone should question how a company that now has a valuation close to 150 billions, can't find a way to communicate with one of the major software companies. AMD's valuation is not 2-3 billions like a few years ago.
Posted on Reply
#9
The Stilt
windwhirlThis is Adobe's fault.
Really?

AMD got 10-bit HEVC hardware encoding support added to AMF in December 2021, despite the first GPU supporting Main10 encoding released in July 2019 (Navi 10).

To this date even FFMpeg does not support Main10 encoding through AMF and the existing patches to mend that (either directly to FFMpeg or it's forks) all have some sort of issues.

So frankly, I'd be surprised if Adobe had it working.

github.com/GPUOpen-LibrariesAndSDKs/AMF/releases/tag/v1.4.23
Posted on Reply
#10
Khonjel
The StiltReally?

AMD got 10-bit HEVC hardware encoding support added to AMF in December 2021, despite the first GPU supporting Main10 encoding released in July 2019 (Navi 10).

To this date even FFMpeg does not support Main10 encoding through AMF and the existing patches to mend that (either directly to FFMpeg or it's forks) all have some sort of issues.

So frankly, I'd be surprised if Adobe had it working.

github.com/GPUOpen-LibrariesAndSDKs/AMF/releases/tag/v1.4.23
I don't know all the technical details but this tells me all I need to know that AMD's gonna be the neglected middle child once Intel joins the GPU fray. Bye bye AMD Radeon. Was nice knowing you were even an alternative to Nvidia GPUs.:roll:
Posted on Reply
#11
pmrdij
Baumwhat? No AMD Support :-/

GGPU came a long way and failed here again.

Is there something missing on other GPU's not use them vor "HEVC" "software" Codec to run on a "graphic card" ?

:-/
Edit: not enough coffee. Previous link removed as that was for decoding... But still for encoding AMD has support in Premiere. Most recent H.265 Hardware Encoding Performance benchmarks I could find don't include the 6000 series and a current release of Premiere but for reference:

www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/Premiere-Pro-14-2-H-264-and-H-265-Hardware-Encoding-Performance-1778/

OK this is Adobe being Adobe. TPU from years ago: www.techpowerup.com/267319/adobe-premiere-pro-to-get-more-gpu-acceleration-and-optimization

Appears what was working in Premiere Pro 14.2 and 15.4.x doesn't exist ATM in 22.2...

15.4.x (aka CC 2021): helpx.adobe.com/premiere-pro/system-requirements/2021.html#hardware-acceleration
Hardware-accelerated HEVC encoding
  • Windows 10 with a supported NVIDIA or AMD card
22.2: helpx.adobe.com/premiere-pro/system-requirements.html#hardware-acceleration
Hardware-accelerated HEVC encoding
  • Windows 10 with a supported Nvidia card
Posted on Reply
#12
TheinsanegamerN
EatingDirtA company can do all those things at the same time, and they did. They aren't mutually exclusive. You can look at their quarterly financials to see it. Operating Expenses up 39% Y/Y.

Also, AMD R&D has nothing to do with Adobe not supporting 10-bit HVEC on AMD GPU's.
Money is not infinite. That 1.8 billion in buybacks could have been spent better developing new tech or helping to fix supply issues.
john_AMD keeps failing in software support. I believe Adobe contacted AMD the same way it does business with Nvidia and Intel.
If not, then someone should question how a company that now has a valuation close to 150 billions, can't find a way to communicate with one of the major software companies. AMD's valuation is not 2-3 billions like a few years ago.
I seem to remember, quite vividly, the interview given by one of the game developers in the AMD evolved system back int he late 2000s, it MAY have been volition, said developer ripped AMD a new one for being nigh on incompetent, having little int he way of support or documentation and being almost impossible to get ahold of for pretty much anything. Nvidia's The Way Its Meant To Be Played, on the other hand, was a breeze, with nvidia being prompt, having thurough documentation, and even sending engineers to assist in optimizing their game engine. This continued into the geforce experience.

AMD's support has always been....second rate, to put it mildly. In part they cannot help it, nvidia's software support group is huge compared to AMD, but other things like the lack of documentation and poor implementation is all on AMD themselves. Gamign evolved may have been over a decade ago, but given AMD's shennanigans int he year since its pretty clear that AMD really hasnt changed.
The StiltReally?

AMD got 10-bit HEVC hardware encoding support added to AMF in December 2021, despite the first GPU supporting Main10 encoding released in July 2019 (Navi 10).

To this date even FFMpeg does not support Main10 encoding through AMF and the existing patches to mend that (either directly to FFMpeg or it's forks) all have some sort of issues.

So frankly, I'd be surprised if Adobe had it working.

github.com/GPUOpen-LibrariesAndSDKs/AMF/releases/tag/v1.4.23
Thank you. How much heavy lifting is Adobe supposed to do here? I may hate adobe with a burning passion, but if AMD has no implementation ready you cant expect adobe to make it for you. This is on par with AMD shipping ryzen 2000 laptops and expecting dell and HP to write drivers for them. Utter laziness.
Posted on Reply
#13
EatingDirt
TheinsanegamerNMoney is not infinite. That 1.8 billion in buybacks could have been spent better developing new tech or helping to fix supply issues.
It's unlikely that they would have done stock buybacks if they thought their future products were inferior. They are confident in their future product stack, so they believe their stock will rise, so they invest in themselves by buying it back. It's a sound future investment. It's also just kind of strange to criticize AMD with this this as AMD increased their operating expenses, percentage wise(39%), more than either Nvidia(25%) or Intel(11%) Y/Y. Monetary amount wise, it was a $400 Million increase. They are clearly investing heavily in R&D.

Not sure what you think AMD can do about supply issues. They are at the mercy of whatever TSMC can give them. Clearly having a lot of cash doesn't matter with supply, or we'd see Nvidia cards in stock.
Posted on Reply
#14
pjl321
Does no one else find it a little strange that they are using such short clips that render in milli-seconds?!!
Is the difference much less when it's a normal length videos with export times of a few minutes to hours? Is it just a latency improvement rather than anything else?

Nobody ever seems to talk about quality when they talk about GPU acceleration of video encoding.
These 2 are exactly the same bitrates and so file sizes but the finished render is massively different...
Posted on Reply
#15
TheGuruStud
Adobe got a paycheck. They haven't optimized anything, ever.
Posted on Reply
#16
windwhirl
TheGuruStudAdobe got a paycheck. They haven't optimized anything, ever.
Best paycheck ever :laugh:
pjl321Does no one else find it a little strange that they are using such short clips that render in milli-seconds?!!
Is the difference much less when it's a normal length videos with export times of a few minutes to hours? Is it just a latency improvement rather than anything else?

Nobody ever seems to talk about quality when they talk about GPU acceleration of video encoding.
These 2 are exactly the same bitrates and so file sizes but the finished render is massively different...
I wonder what's the reason behind that. I mean, 2000 kbps feels like crap for... what's that, 1080p? But look at x264 trashing QSV so freaking thoroughly, and with barely an extra minute.
Posted on Reply
#17
pjl321
windwhirlBest paycheck ever :laugh:


I wonder what's the reason behind that. I mean, 2000 kbps feels like crap for... what's that, 1080p? But look at x264 trashing QSV so freaking thoroughly, and with barely an extra minute.
I think its having it at 2 passes that makes the biggest difference, rather than just plain 2000kb every single second throughout the whole clip it scans it first and some scenes might need 10,000kbps and others might be fine with like 200. Then just averages out at 2000 over the whole thing.
But also x264 just has much better compression algorithms too, they are more complex so harder to calculate but worth it in the end.
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