Thursday, April 2nd 2015

GIGABYTE X99, Z97 and H97 Series Motherboards Ready for Intel SSD 750 Series

GIGABYTE TECHNOLOGY Co. Ltd., a leading manufacturer of motherboards and graphics cards, is proud to announce its complete lineup of motherboards build around the Intel X99 and 9 Series chipsets is compatible with the recently released 750 Series PCIe SSD drive from Intel. The new drives will be available in 400GB and 1.2TB capacities and are expected to deliver performance of up to 2.5/1.2 GB/s sequential read/write speeds and up to 440/290k random IOPs, thus making them the highest performing Intel Client SSD. GIGABYTE's X99 and 9 Series motherboards are able to take full advantage of the fast transfer speeds of this exciting new storage solution from Intel.

Built for enthusiast gamers and workstations, the new 750 Series SSDs are the first consumer oriented PCIe drives by Intel. Using PCIe Gen3 x 4 lanes with the latest and fastest NVMe controller interface, Intel's storage solution features a level of performance never achieved by regular SSDs, which are limited by their SATA connection and old AHCI protocol. Compared to the SATA 3 interface which can technically reach up to 6Gb/s, the PCIe Gen 3 interface is considerably faster as it provides up to 8Gb/s per lane, thereby allowing 32Gb/s of total available bandwidth for the x4 PCIe SSDs.
In real life operation, this means the 750 Series PCIe SSDs are ideal for solving bandwidth critical applications, users' operating systems and everyday files that need to be quickly accessed. This unprecedented response time also means faster loading of games and a better overall gaming experience. When compared to SATA SSDs in a video creation scenario, the 750 Series SSD from Intel are able to achieve a smooth 24 FPS while editing two 4K videos side by side in Adobe Speedgrade CS6, truly bringing the power of the platform to the user.

Current GIGABYTE X99 motherboards are already compatible with the new Intel 750 Series PCIe SSDs. For GIGABYTE 9 Series motherboards, updates are already available for download on the official GIGABYTE website. Motherboards can also be updated by using the @bios utility available in the App Center.
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12 Comments on GIGABYTE X99, Z97 and H97 Series Motherboards Ready for Intel SSD 750 Series

#3
Chaitanya
btarunr
Intel's storage solution features a level of performance never achieved by regular SSDs, which are limited by their SATA connection and old AHCI protocol.
exactly, when it came to SSDs that Ahci protocol should never have been implemented in the first place. it was designed for hard drives and not ssds. I hope even for Sata SSDs in future that Ahci protocol will be killed off for a protocol that is designed for non-rotational media.

I am eagre to read review of these new ssds as they sound promising and hopefull wouldnt be too expensive.
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#4
urza26
Chaitanya
exactly, when it came to SSDs that Ahci protocol should never have been implemented in the first place. it was designed for hard drives and not ssds. I hope even for Sata SSDs in future that Ahci protocol will be killed off for a protocol that is designed for non-rotational media.

I am eagre to read review of these new ssds as they sound promising and hopefull wouldnt be too expensive.
From what I've read so far the Intel SSD 750 sits around $ 1 per GB. So quite a lot more expensive than SATA3 SSD's, but the (theoretical) performance increase makes well up for that imo.
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#5
Chaitanya
urza26
From what I've read so far the Intel SSD 750 sits around $ 1 per GB. So quite a lot more expensive than SATA3 SSD's, but the (theoretical) performance increase makes well up for that imo.
For building workstations for professionals that is not expensive. For enthusiasts it may be a little bit of stretch but many will still consider this drive over competing PCI-E SSDs.
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#6
Prima.Vera
Just a silly question, but why is this bios update actually need it? Shouldn't all PCIe drives be just (cold) plug-n-pray?
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#8
Caring1
Prima.Vera
Just a silly question, but why is this bios update actually need it? Shouldn't all PCIe drives be just (cold) plug-n-pray?
It does sound like a case of knobbling the speed so they can make a faster product in the future, seems to happen a lot in PC component land.
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#9
Freedom4556
Prima.Vera
Just a silly question, but why is this bios update actually need it? Shouldn't all PCIe drives be just (cold) plug-n-pray?
Probably for it to be bootable.
Posted on Reply
#10
MikeMurphy
Chaitanya
exactly, when it came to SSDs that Ahci protocol should never have been implemented in the first place. it was designed for hard drives and not ssds. I hope even for Sata SSDs in future that Ahci protocol will be killed off for a protocol that is designed for non-rotational media.

I am eagre to read review of these new ssds as they sound promising and hopefull wouldnt be too expensive.
SATA will be a relic in three years. No sense in upgrading anything on it.
Posted on Reply
#11
Caring1
MikeMurphy
SATA will be a relic in three years. No sense in upgrading anything on it.
CPU's won't have enough PCI-e lanes, well, so far they never have.
Posted on Reply
#12
Disparia
Caring1
CPU's won't have enough PCI-e lanes, well, so far they never have.
Luckily the Intel 100-Series PCH models will vary more than the 8 and 9-Series we have now. Up from the current 6 to 8 PCIe lanes they'll offer 6 to 20 lanes along with an upgrade to PCIe 3.0. The USB count is still 10 to 14 ports, but with the 100-Series more of them will be USB 3 leading to less 3rd party controllers.

http://hexus.net/tech/news/mainboard/80342-intels-skylake-100-series-chipset-revealed/
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