Tuesday, December 15th 2015

MSI Announces CPU Guard 1151

MSI has received news from various media websites about possible bending of Intel 6th Generation Processors when using heavy-weight cooling solutions. Possible bending might not occur straight away, however, as your system sits on its desk or moving it anywhere, could result in unwanted effects. To make sure you will never encounter this problem we developed the CPU GUARD 1151 to protect your Socket 1151 Intel Xeon E3 v5 / Core / Pentium or Celeron processor which strengthens the corners to withstand more vertical pressure.

Besides protecting your CPU, the CPU GUARD 1151 is also the perfect tool for anyone looking to 'delid' their 6th Generation Intel processor. When re-applying the IHS, the design of the CPU GUARD 1151 tightly locks the HIS ensuring it will stay in its place and you will never have to worry about optimal thermal performance or it moving. Recently the CPU GUARD 1151 was used during an overclocking event, helping top overclockers push their Skylake CPU to the max, breaking world records.
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16 Comments on MSI Announces CPU Guard 1151

#1
GhostRyder
Nice of MSI to be thinking about a way to help fix this!!!
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#2
Octavean
Wow,.....

A CPU shim,.....


I haven't seen one of those since my AMD XP 1900+ CPU,......
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#3
The Von Matrices
So if I understand correctly, this is not a solution for 99.9999% of people. It's a CPU shim for when you delid the processor. This won't work with unmodified CPUs, which makes it hardly a solution for the problem.
Posted on Reply
#4
20mmrain
"The Von Matrices said:
So if I understand correctly, this is not a solution for 99.9999% of people. It's a CPU shim for when you delid the processor. This won't work with unmodified CPUs, which makes it hardly a solution for the problem.
Nope look at the picture bud....you can use it with standard un-modded CPU's.
It just also helps with those who want to delid their CPU's.
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#5
truth teller
im failing to see how this will prevent overtightened or vertically skewed coolers from warping the cpu interposer/pcb
sure it guarantees that the cpu wont move outside of the socket, but wasnt the problem related to the cpu being pushed too far into the socket damaging the interposer and/or the motherboard socket pins? the coolers will keep contact with the cpu ihs, this shim wont do anything against that...
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#6
cadaveca
My name is Dave
"truth teller said:
im failing to see how this will prevent overtightened or vertically skewed coolers from warping the cpu interposer/pcb
sure it guarantees that the cpu wont move outside of the socket, but wasnt the problem related to the cpu being pushed too far into the socket damaging the interposer and/or the motherboard socket pins? the coolers will keep contact with the cpu ihs, this shim wont do anything against that...
You are correct, but the shim and the backplate together make a pretty tight metal-pcb-socket-pcb-metal sandwich. You have to remove the stock mounting mechanism and replace it with the CPU guard. This would put the torsion onto the motherboard PCB itself, not the socket or CPU.
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#7
crazyeyesreaper
Chief Broken Rig
I should probably look into getting one of these...
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#8
cadaveca
My name is Dave
"crazyeyesreaper said:
I should probably look into getting one of these...
HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA.

You, sir, should not have any issues with a system laying flat. you just got a bum chip or something methinks.
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#9
crazyeyesreaper
Chief Broken Rig
true but still hilarious you gotta admit with all my issues they come out with this damn thing day late dollar short etc etc.
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#10
lZKoce
They caught me off guard on this one. Unlike "DA PRO SLI bridge"....this might have a leg to stand on :)
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#11
Sihastru
I hope you realize this is a scam. It will not help in any significant way, the CPU interface PCB bends because the IHS rests directly on it (they are glued with that dark grey adhesive). And it is the IHS that makes contact with the cooler, not the CPU's interface PCB.

The points of greatest stress are the corners of the IHS. The guard doesn't make significant contact with the IHS. And the part of metal plate that they think will provide the counter pressure on top of the PCB won't do that. Because the problem is that the CPU socket on the motherboard has cavities where those IHS corners push on the PCB. So it will still bend, because the "sandwich" is incomplete.
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#12
trog100
"Sihastru said:
I hope you realize this is a scam. It will not help in any significant way, the CPU interface PCB bends because the IHS rests directly on it (they are glued with that dark grey adhesive). And it is the IHS that makes contact with the cooler, not the CPU's interface PCB.

The points of greatest stress are the corners of the IHS. The guard doesn't make significant contact with the IHS. And the part of metal plate that they think will provide the counter pressure on top of the PCB won't do that. Because the problem is that the CPU socket on the motherboard has cavities where those IHS corners push on the PCB. So it will still bend, because the "sandwich" is incomplete.
yes its not going to stop the "thin" pcb board from bending.. not in the slightest..

trog
Posted on Reply
#13
Vlada011
At least they tried to help. I love company ready to show up with fast solutions for even small issues.
Always is better if you upgrade 3-4 months after launch date. That's enough to people recognize similar issue and maybe make other decision.
If someone invest first week in Skylake he need to find other solutions, who prepare to upgrade now maybe this little problems with other advantage of six cores is chance to people choose Wellsburg Haswell-EP for now and delay Skylake until Intel present Lewisburg with six channel DDR4 memory, 20 lanes on PCH and 48 with new processors.
X99 is not bad investment, one chipset is long time on market. When Broadwell-E show up Haswell-E will be 2 years old and Broadwell-E will work arround 18 months at least before new socket and chipset if in mean time everything is OK.
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#14
EarthDog
"cadaveca said:
HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA.

You, sir, should not have any issues with a system laying flat. you just got a bum chip or something methinks.
Mine is bent. It was laying flat with a waterblock on it.

That said, the waterblock mounts doesn't have 'stops' so it is likely my fault due to over tightening.
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#15
trog100
the point that needs making is that the thing we are talking about has bugger all to do with thinner skylake pcb boards bending.. its meant for (together with a shim) genuinely de-lidded chips..

trog
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#16
EarthDog
Wait, isn't the point of the delid die gaurd (which is a different looking device) to not crush the DIE (yes)? I mean look at it and look at this thing. There are SIGNIFICANT differences. Though this can be used for both it seems...

Now, in looking a lot closer at the device, particularly the top two corners in the image provided above (or if you adjust brightness you can see that on the bottom two corners), we can see the corners sticking out THROUGH this new device. That leads me to believe, but of course cannot confirm with 100% certainty, that as Shihastru said, the "sandwhich" is actually complete. I could be wrong, but, it seems like there is some height to the device where the CPU almost slides in it (or has something under it) and then you mount it to the board. If it is just on top and there is nothing below it to support it and prevent the bending, then I agree.
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