Friday, September 23rd 2016

Global PCle SSD Market to Grow 33.24% by 2020

Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Global PCle SSD Market 2016-2020" report to their offering. The report forecast the global peripheral component interconnect express (PCIe) SSD market to grow at a CAGR of 33.24% during the period 2016-2020. The report has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry experts. The report covers the market landscape and its growth prospects over the coming years. The report also includes a discussion of the key vendors operating in this market.

According to the report, need for managed service data centers will be a key driver for market growth. It is advantageous for an enterprise to operate a colocation facility rather than to build a data center. Data center colocation allows enterprises to rent computing storage, servers, and network. It enables minimal utilization of power and bandwidth and enhances the security of enterprise IT equipment.
Further, the report states that the lack of availability of constant low latency is a major challenge. Write latency can be masked with write-back caching. However, read latency cannot be hidden.

Key vendors:
  • Intel
  • Micron
  • Samsung
  • Seagate
  • Western Digital
  • Toshiba
Key questions answered in this report:
  • What will the market size be in 2020 and what will the growth rate be?
  • What are the key market trends?
  • What is driving this market?
  • What are the challenges to market growth?
  • Who are the key vendors in this market space?
  • What are the market opportunities and threats faced by the key vendors?
  • What are the strengths and weaknesses of the key vendors?
To access the report, visit this page (starting at $2,500).
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32 Comments on Global PCle SSD Market to Grow 33.24% by 2020

#1
Nuckles56
Is that all? If they brought down the price a bit more, then the growth would be a lot higher as people always want a bit more speed
Posted on Reply
#2
lZKoce
With these add-on PCIe SSD cards, I realized I don't want a mini ITX build anymore. As there is only one PCIe slot. Micro ATX is lowest size I would go now :D
Posted on Reply
#3
slozomby
I'm confused. mostly I see these as benefitting small companies that only have a couple of servers. larger companies aren't really interested in local storage options. there are very few server applications that require that level of io capabilities that aren't already benefiting from solid state in the san and multiple 10gb fiber links.

imo, once the U.2 interface has some real options and support both pcie and m2 (outside of laptops) will start to phase out for storage.
Posted on Reply
#4
Prima.Vera
How about price? Should we expect a 33.24% reduction, or even more?
Posted on Reply
#5
slozomby
Prima.Vera said:
How about price? Should we expect a 33.24% reduction, or even more?
considering I paid $4K for a 100GB pcie ssd 6 years ago (well my company bought it) . and they're now $300 for a 400gb model . I'd expect the price to continue to fall as space increases.
Posted on Reply
#6
dj-electric
lZKoce said:
With these add-on PCIe SSD cards, I realized I don't want a mini ITX build anymore. As there is only one PCIe slot. Micro ATX is lowest size I would go now :D
Some MITX boards have M.2 support at the back
Posted on Reply
#7
lZKoce
Dj-ElectriC said:
Some MITX boards have M.2 support at the back
I know, but I got the feeling the performance is not the same. It's just an assumption, I haven't compared any results/ benchmarks between onboard M.2 slot and add-on card.
Posted on Reply
#8
RejZoR
They should focus more on large capacity drives so people get the reason to ditch stupid small SSD boot drives next to crappy "eco" HDD's. 2TB is still some freaking exclusive like 0.5% of us have.
Posted on Reply
#9
FR@NK
lZKoce said:
I know, but I got the feeling the performance is not the same. It's just an assumption, I haven't compared any results/ benchmarks between onboard M.2 slot and add-on card.
Performance would be the same as long as the M.2 drive is 4x PCIe. The slower M.2 drives would use the SATA interface.
Posted on Reply
#10
RejZoR
I don't think there is much difference between SATA3 or PCIe until you wander into Samsung M.2 960 Pro territory with what, 3.6 GB/s reads and 300k IOPS ? And even that would show with things that actually require such massive sequential reads or such intense shuffling of tiny snippets of data that 300k IOPS would really shine through. For the rest, even 550MB/s and 100k IOPS is superb if drive can deliver it consistently. I mean, comparing even that to top end 200MB/s HDD's with few hundred IOPS for random and you can see the difference from specs itself already.
Posted on Reply
#11
ManofGod
Yet, they still will not make any real world, day to day difference over Sata SSD's. (Benchmarks mean nothing.)
Posted on Reply
#12
RejZoR
I've had a M.2 AHCI drive with 3x sequential read speed (1500MB/s) and it didn't feel any faster than current 850 Pro on SATA3. IOPS were the same at 100K.
Posted on Reply
#13
Prima.Vera
ManofGod said:
Yet, they still will not make any real world, day to day difference over Sata SSD's. (Benchmarks mean nothing.)
I give you a simple example. Heavy multi-tasking threads. Eg: Copying multiple files on the same time, while downloading 10 torrents at once with full LAN speed. All this when having multiple instance of Office apps, IE/Chrome opened. ;)

You still want to bet there is no difference? ;)
Posted on Reply
#14
alucasa
I used boot drive even before SSD came along, so even if 1TB SSD becomes like 50 bucks, I will still use small SSD for OS.
Posted on Reply
#15
slozomby
Prima.Vera said:
you a simple example. Heavy multi-tasking threads. Eg: Copying multiple files on the same time, while downloading 10 torrents at once with full LAN speed. All this
in that case you will see a performance gain. you would also see a performance gain by splitting that io across different drives. or utilizing a caching raid controller.

and lets be honest how often are you really doing all that io at the same time.
Posted on Reply
#16
Grings
lZKoce said:
With these add-on PCIe SSD cards, I realized I don't want a mini ITX build anymore. As there is only one PCIe slot. Micro ATX is lowest size I would go now :D
The Asus Maximus VIII Impact has a U.2 slot, afaik only intel make u.2 drives at the moment (the same internally as the pci card pictured in the op), they are very good but not as cheap as m2 sticks
Posted on Reply
#17
Vayra86
slozomby said:
in that case you will see a performance gain. you would also see a performance gain by splitting that io across different drives. or utilizing a caching raid controller.

and lets be honest how often are you really doing all that io at the same time.
Only when doing something on a professional basis really.

PCIe SSD speeds are just not noticeable for average/consumer use. It is that simple. Only thing that matters is jumping from mechanical HDD to SSD, beyond that we're talking about milliseconds or zero noticeable differences.
Posted on Reply
#18
Giggles
If you are only using the system for documents and web browsing then you might as well buy 256 GB SSD instead of a HDD that is if you won't require additional space.

PCIe SSDs are useful because even when fragmented they are still fast.
Posted on Reply
#19
slozomby
Vayra86 said:
Only when doing something on a professional basis really.

PCIe SSD speeds are just not noticeable for average/consumer use. It is that simple. Only thing that matters is jumping from mechanical HDD to SSD, beyond that we're talking about milliseconds or zero noticeable differences.
exactly.

8 threaded copy from my Samsung evo 850 to my R5 stripe (4x4tb WD red) on my perc 710.

it took 13 minutes to move 292 GB from games drive to my storage stripe. while surfing the web and downloading Doom from steam.

I cant think of too many times I need to move more than that where being bottlenecked by a network isn't involved and I've cared about how long a copy took. and most of those involve restoring exchange or sql databases across a 40Gb/s san link. the rest of the time its: "oh I need to replace my 2tb drive with a 4tb drive. lemme kick off the copy and go eat dinner"

Giggles said:

PCIe SSDs are useful because even when fragmented they are still fast.
there are very few slow SSDs, pcie, m.2, u.2 give much faster sequential speeds than sata . but seek times of 3-5 ns isn't any different between the interfaces. the quality of the embedded controller has more to do with the random throughput than the interface.
Posted on Reply
#20
Prima.Vera
slozomby said:
in that case you will see a performance gain. you would also see a performance gain by splitting that io across different drives. or utilizing a caching raid controller.

and lets be honest how often are you really doing all that io at the same time.
True and fair enough. But on my working laptop, I'm used to open 1 million IE/Firefox instances, transfer a lot of files to and from the Shareddrive, loading large assemblies in CATIA and/or SolidWorks, which btw, even with a fast SSD it takes minutes! So yeah, I could always use a faster SSD/
Posted on Reply
#21
slozomby
Prima.Vera said:
True and fair enough. But on my working laptop, I'm used to open 1 million IE/Firefox instances, transfer a lot of files to and from the Shareddrive, loading large assemblies in CATIA and/or SolidWorks, which btw, even with a fast SSD it takes minutes! So yeah, I could always use a faster SSD/
yeah solidworks is a beast.

thankfully upgrades to engineering workstations generally pay for themselves in time saved.
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#22
AsRock
TPU addict
Gotta love the accuracy 33.24%, no guessing that it be 25-33% it's just a pain 33.24% :P.
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#23
Vario
Full size ATX might be worthwhile again for a lot of gamers just for the PCI-E slots.
A lot of people run M-ATX/ITX these days.
Posted on Reply
#24
FYFI13
"Global PCle SSD Market to Grow 33.24% by 2020"
I can bet 1000 euro, the number by 2020 will be different. No man can predict with that accuracy.
Posted on Reply
#25
cdawall
where the hell are my stars
Vario said:
Full size ATX might be worthwhile again for a lot of gamers just for the PCI-E slots.
A lot of people run M-ATX/ITX these days.
PCI-e exists beyond the slot pictured. Remember M.2 supports a full PCI-e 3.0 4x interface.
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