Tuesday, February 18th 2020

AMD Gets Design Win in Cray Shasta Supercomputer for US Navy DSRC With 290,304 EPYC Cores

AMD has scored yet another design win for usage of its high-performance EPYC processors in the Cray Shasta supercomputer. The Cray Shasta will be deployed in the US Navy's Department of Defense Supercomputing Resource Center (DSRC) as part of the High Performance Computing Modernization Program. The peak theoretical computing capability of 12.8 PetaFLOPS, or 12.8 quadrillion floating point operations per second supercomputer will be built with 290,304 AMD EPYC (Rome) processor cores and 112 NVIDIA Volta V100 General-Purpose Graphics Processing Units (GPGPUs). The system will also feature 590 total terabytes (TB) of memory and 14 petabytes (PB) of usable storage, including 1 PB of NVMe-based solid state storage. Cray's Slingshot network will make sure all those components talk to each other at a rate of 200 Gigabits per second.

Navy DSRC supercomputers support climate, weather, and ocean modeling by NMOC, which assists U.S. Navy meteorologists and oceanographers in predicting environmental conditions that may affect the Navy fleet. Among other scientific endeavors, the new supercomputer will be used to enhance weather forecasting models; ultimately, this improves the accuracy of hurricane intensity and track forecasts. The system is expected to be online by early fiscal year 2021.
Source: HPC Wire
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30 Comments on AMD Gets Design Win in Cray Shasta Supercomputer for US Navy DSRC With 290,304 EPYC Cores

#1
64K
Pretty impressive. I wonder what something like this costs?
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#2
ARF
Not that much, 4563 EPYCs with 64 cores each and if one is $6500, then around M$29.5.
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#3
Dammeron
I'm surprised to see the first comment wasn't like "will it run crysis?" or similar...

But that's some beast they got - imagine both power draw and heat output of that. Greta Thunberg does not aprove. :p
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#4
PerfectWave
to run crysis just need the new threadripper 64 cores ....
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#6
Mark Little
Dammeron
I'm surprised to see the first comment wasn't like "will it run crysis?" or similar...

But that's some beast they got - imagine both power draw and heat output of that. Greta Thunberg does not aprove. :p
If it uses only solar and wind power then it can draw as much as it wants.
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#7
robot zombie
That's cray cray... now where's my bottle of Shasta Cola? Let's celebrate!
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#8
sergionography
Dammeron
I'm surprised to see the first comment wasn't like "will it run crysis?" or similar...

But that's some beast they got - imagine both power draw and heat output of that. Greta Thunberg does not aprove. :p
We already know that one threadripper 3990x can run crysis. Post came out few days ago. So this being based on thoughsands of that chip def can run crysis
Posted on Reply
#9
Patriot
Decent sized mainly cpu based, 4-6 racks of gpu servers 25-30racks of cpu servers.
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#11
ratirt
AMD better speed things up with the GPUs. This is impressive that AMD gets the Epyc up and running but if they have GPU that would do the job it would have been way better. AMD CPUs are great and if AMD buckled up and get the GPUs going it would have been a great opportunity and business for AMD to pair it with AMD's GPU.
Posted on Reply
#12
DeathtoGnomes
ARF
Not that much, 4563 EPYCs with 64 cores each and if one is $6500, then around M$29.5.
this small computer :rolleyes: would need 5184, 56 core, Xeons to match the core count. Not sure of the price but $20k+ each is whats ringing in my ear. At that price they could build 3 of these with EPYCs.
Posted on Reply
#13
ratirt
DeathtoGnomes
this small computer :rolleyes: would need 5184, 56 core, Xeons to match the core count. Not sure of the price but $20k+ each is whats ringing in my ear. At that price they could build 3 of these with EPYCs.
Yes they could use Xeons if Intel can get those delivered. Wonder how long would that take. And the price $$ would have been astronomical.
Posted on Reply
#14
R0H1T
ARF
Not that much, 4563 EPYCs with 64 cores each and if one is $6500, then around M$29.5.
Thanks for the quick math.
DeathtoGnomes
this small computer :rolleyes: would need 5184, 56 core, Xeons to match the core count. Not sure of the price but $20k+ each is whats ringing in my ear. At that price they could build 3 of these with EPYCs.
The thing with the 56 core Xeon is though that they do not come anywhere close to the AMD chips in terms of efficiency. Besides Intel's probably making these parts only for demonstration because I see no price listed & of course the yields would be horrific, even after accounting for the fact that they're 2 Xeon platinums glued together.
Posted on Reply
#15
bug
sergionography
We already know that one threadripper 3990x can run crysis. Post came out few days ago. So this being based on thoughsands of that chip def can run crysis
And probably by itself. In multiplayer.
Posted on Reply
#16
R0H1T
But can it run Cyberpunk 2077 :pimp:
Posted on Reply
#17
Dammeron
PerfectWave
to run crysis just need the new threadripper 64 cores ....
sergionography
We already know that one threadripper 3990x can run crysis. Post came out few days ago. So this being based on thoughsands of that chip def can run crysis
As for TR 3990x, I wouldn't call it "running", more like "slow-paced walking full of tripping". But the fact is that in a few years that famous question will probably become obsolete. :)
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#18
pjl321
Interesting that it's not using AMD's Arcturus accelerator, also that they didn't choose to use Milan. I wouldn't have thought a CPU will actually be installed for at least 9 months and Milan should be easily out by then.
Posted on Reply
#19
bug
pjl321
Interesting that it's not using AMD's Arcturus accelerator, also that they didn't choose to use Milan. I wouldn't have thought a CPU will actually be installed for at least 9 months and Milan should be easily out by then.
I'm guessing it's harder to gain public $$$ with unreleased products. Though at least from Milan I don't expect any surprises at this point.
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#20
R0H1T
Or that JHH offered them a deal they simply couldn't refuse.
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#21
renz496
ratirt
AMD better speed things up with the GPUs. This is impressive that AMD gets the Epyc up and running but if they have GPU that would do the job it would have been way better. AMD CPUs are great and if AMD buckled up and get the GPUs going it would have been a great opportunity and business for AMD to pair it with AMD's GPU.
if nvidia is one step ahead with hardware with software nvidia is 10 step ahead of AMD. and it seems in professional world the big player are moving away from openCL and try to push their own version of "open standard". apple with metal. intel with one API.
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#22
pjl321
I guess Milan is meant to be a new architecture so maybe they weren't willing and didn't need to 'take a risk' on Milan when Rome did the job just fine. Also, I would expect Rome to be cheaper than Milan just because of availability and stuff.
Posted on Reply
#23
bug
pjl321
I guess Milan is meant to be a new architecture so maybe they weren't willing and didn't need to 'take a risk' on Milan when Rome did the job just fine. Also, I would expect Rome to be cheaper than Milan just because of availability and stuff.
A bird in hand... ;)
Posted on Reply
#24
pjl321
...and Epyc can kill 128 birds with one processor.
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#25
prtskg
pjl321
Interesting that it's not using AMD's Arcturus accelerator, also that they didn't choose to use Milan. I wouldn't have thought a CPU will actually be installed for at least 9 months and Milan should be easily out by then.
They are going with what is available now and working nicely.
Posted on Reply
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