Sunday, December 20th 2020

Intel 11th Gen Core "Rocket Lake" Desktop TDP Values Surface

Intel's 11th Gen Core "Rocket Lake-S" desktop processors could feature similar TDP values to their 10th Gen "Comet Lake-S" predecessors, according to Momomo_us. Intel is preparing to give the Unlocked "K" and "KF" SKUs a TDP rating of 125 W, while the locked non-K models feature 65 W rating. The lineup is led by the 8-core/16-thread Core i9-11900K, followed by the locked i9-11900 and iGPU-devoid i9-11900F; the slightly slower 8-core/16-thread Core i7-11700K, followed by the i7-11700KF, i7-11700, and i7-11700F; and the 6-core/12-thread i5-10600K and its derivatives.

The 11th Gen Core desktop processor series arrives in Q1 2021, and is based on the 14 nm "Rocket Lake-S" silicon, and built into the Socket LGA1200 package, with backwards compatibility with Intel's 400-series chipset motherboards, and native support for the Intel 500-series. The "Rocket Lake-S" die is rumored to feature up to 8 "Cypress Cove" CPU cores, a dual-channel DDR4 memory controller, a 24-lane PCI-Express 4.0 root complex, and an updated Gen12 iGPU based on the Xe LP graphics architecture. The "Cypress Cove" CPU cores are reportedly 14 nm back-ports of the "Willow Cove" cores, and feature a double-digit percent IPC increase over the "Skylake" cores.
Source: momomo_us (Twitter)
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9 Comments on Intel 11th Gen Core "Rocket Lake" Desktop TDP Values Surface

#1
Mussels
Moderprator
I wonder what the PL1 and PL2 limits for these will be, more 65W->200W chips?
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#2
sprcorreia
The article lists 10xxx CPUs in what is supposed to be the 11th gen. Might want to correct that.
Posted on Reply
#3
watzupken
The TDP values are meaningless in my opinion. What is the point of showing TDP when you know naturally the CPU is going to pull substantially more for power for the purpose of hitting that sorts of performance/ clockspeed that they are marketing.
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#4
ZoneDymo
pretty cheeky of them to still release locked cpu's.
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#5
voltage
ZoneDymopretty cheeky of them to still release locked cpu's.
why? not every diy builder over clocks every build. so, you can save a bit of $ on locked version sku's.
Posted on Reply
#6
Fourstaff
watzupkenThe TDP values are meaningless in my opinion. What is the point of showing TDP when you know naturally the CPU is going to pull substantially more for power for the purpose of hitting that sorts of performance/ clockspeed that they are marketing.
Some motherboards will design to TDP (or PL1) and no more, its still serves as a reference as "minimum spec".
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#7
DeathtoGnomes
sprcorreiaThe article lists 10xxx CPUs in what is supposed to be the 11th gen. Might want to correct that.
@btarunr likely an unintentional typo while drinking coffee.. :D
Posted on Reply
#8
ExcuseMeWtf
TDP values look fine, though keep in mind they are not equivalent to actual power consumption of chips themselves.
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#9
ZoneDymo
voltagewhy? not every diy builder over clocks every build. so, you can save a bit of $ on locked version sku's.
I would say it costs extra effort on Intel's side to lock the chips, they locked them and then choose ot sell some unlocked at a premium.
WIth AMD you can buy the more overclock friendly versions if you want for a bit more money, orrr you can buy the cheaper normal version but still overclock, no artificial restrictions.
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