Monday, February 15th 2021

Sony Playstation 5 SoC Die Has Been Pictured

When AMD and Sony collaborated on making the next generation console chip, AMD has internally codenamed it Flute, while Sony codenamed it Oberon or Ariel. This PlayStation 5 SoC die has today been pictured thanks to the Fritzchens Fritz and we get to see a closer look at the die internals. Featuring eight of AMD's Zen2 cores that can reach frequencies of up to 3.5 GHz, the CPU is paired with 36 CU GPU based on the RDNA 2 technology. The GPU is capable of running at speed of up to 2.23 GHz. The SoC has been made to accommodate all of that hardware, and bring IO to connect it all.

When tearing down the console, the heatsink and the SoC are connected by liquid metal, which is used to achieve the best possible heat transfer between two surfaces. Surrounding the die there is a small amount of material used to prevent liquid metal (a conductive material) from possibly spilling and shorting some components. Using a special short wave infrared light (SWIR) microscope, we can take a look at what is happening under the hood without destroying the chip. And really, there are a few distinct areas that are highlighted by the Twitter user @Locuza. As you can see, the die has special sectors with the CPU complex and a GPU matrix with plenty of workgroups and additional components for raytracing.
According to the photographer, there are also a few components missing compared to the original Zen 2 design, with that being the Fixed Function Units (FFU) and Fused Multiply-Add (FMA/FMADD) functions likely not needed for the gaming console. According to the Twitter user Locuza, Sony has cut down the floating-point pipeline from 256-bit width to 128-bit wide bus. Another important note is that there is no L3 cache (Infinity Cache) being present, just like it is missing on Xbox Series X SoC as well. You can take a look at the die for yourself below.
Sources: Fritzchens Fritz, Locuza, via VideoCardz
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13 Comments on Sony Playstation 5 SoC Die Has Been Pictured

#1
mouacyk
Even the big boys are using LM now. How redeeming.
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#2
dgianstefani
mouacyk
Even the big boys are using LM now. How redeeming.
It's always been the best. Problem has been only enthusiasts are good enough/care enough to apply it in the way it should be.
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#3
ZoneDymo
dgianstefani
It's always been the best. Problem has been only enthusiasts are good enough/care enough to apply it in the way it should be.
Wasnt the issue questionable longevity ?
Posted on Reply
#4
dgianstefani
No, the issue has always been correct application, with safeguards if you have delicate components near the application if you put too much or whatever.
Posted on Reply
#5
mouacyk
dgianstefani
No, the issue has always been correct application, with safeguards if you have delicate components near the application if you put too much or whatever.
ZoneDymo
Wasnt the issue questionable longevity ?
Avoiding improper mixture of metals to prevent corrosion and extreme galvanization. My applications on copper and nickel have lasted for years, looking like new.
Posted on Reply
#6
watzupken
dgianstefani
It's always been the best. Problem has been only enthusiasts are good enough/care enough to apply it in the way it should be.
It is one of the best no doubt, but it is not without its cons though. There is always the risk of bad application (which does not matter to us since it is Sony that will need to take precaution), and also how long the LM will last before one need to reapply it? Its liquid, and will not stay liquid forever. If it is out of warranty, and the LM is dried, does it mean that the owner will need to get professional help to disassemble the console and reapply it again? From the teardown of the PS5, it is not a straight forward process that most will want to undertake.
Posted on Reply
#7
BArms
mouacyk
Avoiding improper mixture of metals to prevent corrosion and extreme galvanization. My applications on copper and nickel have lasted for years, looking like new.
I find that hard to believe, since any LM i've seen seems to form a molecular layer that bonds with the copper and cannot be wiped off if it's been on there for awhile. This layer doesn't hurt temps it seems, but it does permanently deface the copper side of the cooler and makes the writing on the nickle IHS completely illegible, at least this is what happened with my 8700K.
Posted on Reply
#8
lola46
If AMD can make this APU to PC market it would be game changer
Posted on Reply
#9
mouacyk
BArms
I find that hard to believe, since any LM i've seen seems to form a molecular layer that bonds with the copper and cannot be wiped off if it's been on there for awhile. This layer doesn't hurt temps it seems, but it does permanently deface the copper side of the cooler and makes the writing on the nickle IHS completely illegible, at least this is what happened with my 8700K.
i meant it functions as new
Posted on Reply
#10
R-T-B
watzupken
Its liquid, and will not stay liquid forever.
This isn't how physics work. It doesn't evaporate like water. It's naturally a liquid at this temperature range. The most likely phase-change that will happen to it is solidification, and even that takes near freezing temps.
The only ways it can dry out is with a chemical reaction at this point. Even if it freezes, it will return to liquid once the tempature rises again.
BArms
I find that hard to believe, since any LM i've seen seems to form a molecular layer that bonds with the copper and cannot be wiped off if it's been on there for awhile. This layer doesn't hurt temps it seems, but it does permanently deface the copper side of the cooler and makes the writing on the nickle IHS completely illegible, at least this is what happened with my 8700K.
Thermal Grizzly Conductonaut at least doesn't do well on copper, but nickel plated copper has always been fine with me. Copper is fine too if you don't mind reapplying a few times after the first few failed coats form a layer to protect it.

It stains everything of course, but that's a given.
Posted on Reply
#11
dgianstefani
Conductonaut does fine on copper, you just have to reapply if it's bare copper as it will alloy and absorb into the copper. One or two reapplications during the first month and after that it will be fine - having made it's own conductonaut/gallium/indium alloy on the surface of the copper. Nickel copper will not react.
Posted on Reply
#12
Vayra86
Pretty little chip. Nice bit of innovation for a console, too.
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#13
BluesFanUK
Availability aside has this got any other issues? Have heard of annoying coin whine and possibly overheating, though not sure if that's widespread.

I'll no doubt get a PS5 (when scalpers get bored of buying up the stock), past history has taught me that Sony do tend to update the systems a fair bit though.
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