Thursday, April 14th 2022

CPU-Z Adds Support for AMD Rembrandt/Raphael APUs and Preliminary Intel Arc and Raptor Lake Support

CPU-Z is one of the most widespread tools for profiling and monitoring, gathering information from the system, and presenting it in a user-readable UI. Today, the application has reached another milestone with the release of the CPU-Z 2.01 version, which brings support for additional upcoming processors from AMD and Intel. One of the software highlights is the inclusion of AMD's forthcoming processor designs, codenamed Rembrandt and Raphael. These processors are what AMD is bringing to the market now and in the near future, meaning that the software ecosystem has to prepare. Additionally, CPU-Z has been updated with preliminary support for Intel's upcoming 13th Generation Raptor Lake processors, alongside Intel ARC 3/5/7 DG2 designs. CPU-Z developers also improved validation process for high-frequency overclocking submissions of over 6 GHz. The full changelog is listed below.

Download CPU-Z 2.01 here.
Changelog:
  • Glenfly Arise-GT10C0 GPU.
  • Intel Core i9-12900T, Core i5-12600T (35W).
  • Intel Atom x6427FE, x6425RE, x6425E, x6414RE, x6413E, x6212RE, x6211E, x6200FE (Elkhart Lake, FCBGA1493).
  • Intel Pentium J6425, N6415 (Elkhart Lake, FCBGA1493).
  • Intel Celeron J6413, N6211 (Elkhart Lake, FCBGA1493).
  • Preliminary support for Intel ARC 3/5/7 (DG2).
  • Preliminary support for Intel Raptor Lake (13th gen).
  • AMD Ryzen 7 5700X, Ryzen 5 5600/5500.
  • AMD Ryzen 3 5300GE, Ryzen 3 PRO 5350GE, Ryzen 5 PRO 5650GE, Ryzen 7 PRO 5750GE (Cezanne).
  • AMD Ryzen 9 6980HX, 6900HX, Ryzen 7 6800H, Ryzen 5 6600H (45W).
  • AMD Ryzen 9 6980HS, 6900HS, Ryzen 7 6800HS, Ryzen 5 6600HS (35W).
  • AMD Ryzen 7 6800U, Ryzen 5 6600U (15-28W).
  • AMD Ryzen 7 5825U, Ryzen 5 5625U, Ryzen 3 5425U (15W).
  • AMD Rembrandt & Raphael APUs (RDNA2).
  • AMD Mendocino APU (Zen2 + RDNA2).
  • AMD Radeon RX 6850M XT GPU (NAVI22).
  • AMD RX 6800S, RX 6700S, RX 6650M, RX 6650M XT GPUs (NAVI23).
  • NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3090 Ti GPU (GA102-350, 450W).
  • Improved information accuracy when core isolation is enabled.
  • Improved validation process for high clock submissions (>6GHz).
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14 Comments on CPU-Z Adds Support for AMD Rembrandt/Raphael APUs and Preliminary Intel Arc and Raptor Lake Support

#1
Ferrum Master
What kind of shit is it? They really cannot put up other names?
AMD Mendocino
Posted on Reply
#3
Denver
Ferrum MasterWhat kind of shit is it? They really cannot put up other names?
An APU based on the Steam deck SOC? Perhaps a low cost alternative to the Zen3+ which are limited to options with 8c/16T and 6c/12T.
Posted on Reply
#4
trsttte
DenverAn APU based on the Steam deck SOC? Perhaps a low cost alternative to the Zen3+ which are limited to options with 8c/16T and 6c/12T.
The Steam deck SOC used the code name Aerith (also known as Van Gogh at some point)
Posted on Reply
#6
ncrs
Ferrum MasterThat's the problem. Not that people died out still remembering it. You cannot forget something that horrible.
Horrible? Celeron 300A was one of the best OC CPUs ever made :P
Posted on Reply
#7
JalleR
ncrsHorrible? Celeron 300A was one of the best OC CPUs ever made :p
yes mine was running 600 on AIR and was only limited by the ABIT Motherboard I had not being able to run higher FSB :D Good times good times :)
Posted on Reply
#8
chrcoluk
cpuz dev got early sample, or does AMD send them the detection code?
Posted on Reply
#9
Cheeseball
Not a Potato
Ferrum MasterThat's the problem. Not that people died out still remembering it. You cannot forget something that horrible.
Dude the Celeron 300A was one of the best CPUs of its time. Imagine a 300 MHz CPU being pushed to 450 MHz and netting Pentium II 450 performance for $150 vs $650 (in 1998). Quake II, Half-Life and Fallout 2 never ran so fast.
Posted on Reply
#10
Ferrum Master
CheeseballDude the Celeron 300A was one of the best CPUs of its time. Imagine a 300 MHz CPU being pushed to 450 MHz and netting Pentium II 450 performance for $150 vs $650 (in 1998). Quake II, Half-Life and Fallout 2 never ran so fast.
Dude, it was POS no matter how you look at it. On most things it ran slower than any Deschutes. Gaming benchmarks in 1998, not anybody had their Voodoos and used the PC exactly for school and work. You cannot OC an office machine and expect it as a norm.
Posted on Reply
#11
Cheeseball
Not a Potato
Ferrum MasterDude, it was POS no matter how you look at it. On most things it ran slower than any Deschutes. Gaming benchmarks in 1998, not anybody had their Voodoos and used the PC exactly for school and work. You cannot OC an office machine and expect it as a norm.
The only difference between the Mendocino and Deschutes CPUs was that one had 128KB of L2 while the other had 512 and higher default clocks (and price difference). I don't see how it would be considered a POS when you can practically match the performance of the more expensive part with minimal issues, especially during that era.
Posted on Reply
#12
ncrs
CheeseballThe only difference between the Mendocino and Deschutes CPUs was that one had 128KB of L2 while the other had 512 and higher default clocks (and price difference). I don't see how it would be considered a POS when you can practically match the performance of the more expensive part with minimal issues, especially during that era.
There was another difference. While Deschutes had 512KB L2 it was off-die while running at half speed. Mendocino had 128KB of on-die, full speed L2. This is probably the reason why an overclocked Celeron 300A slightly exceeded a 450MHz Deschutes in performance:



"Celeron 450A" is the OC 300A, source.
Posted on Reply
#13
Ferrum Master
ncrsThere was another difference. While Deschutes had 512KB L2 it was off-die while running at half speed. Mendocino had 128KB of on-die, full speed L2. This is probably the reason why an overclocked Celeron 300A slightly exceeded a 450MHz Deschutes in performance:

"Celeron 450A" is the OC 300A, source.
Pulling some obscure leftover benchies? How sweet. I still have a working s370 i815 board.

Celery still ran like crap, and there it earned the saying - There are Processors and there are Celerons. You could still use super socket 7 AMD K6 and it performed on average same in office productivity... same in a bad meaning, not even mentioning all review sites during those days ran those benches without active AMDK6 optimization flags, the corrupt WINTEL practices stemmed from early 90ties. Office machines didn't even have 100MHz capable SDRAM modules to even be able to OC, nor the older chipset was capable of it, maybe FSB83 with funky dividers breaking everything except Voodoos, and then that's not a office machine anymore. Chipsets having proper dividers came later and still sucked thou. Also, not all celeries actually did 100FSB... you had to cherry pick them.

Until first SLOT1 PIII Katmai came in 440GXs(yes exactly dual GX), witch did 600MHz also(cache included), but only in latter autumn first Coppermine came and become the basic norm for any machine including much needed instruction sets.

I kinda understand this is a tech enthusiast site, but in reality this CPU was trash anywhere you encountered it, and you have to be ready with two times slower install/servicing times.
Posted on Reply
#14
ncrs
Ferrum MasterPulling some obscure leftover benchies? How sweet. I still have a working s370 i815 board.
How is Anandtech obscure? :D
Ferrum MasterCelery still ran like crap, and there it earned the saying - There are Processors and there are Celerons. You could still use super socket 7 AMD K6 and it performed on average same in office productivity... same in a bad meaning, not even mentioning all review sites during those days ran those benches without active AMDK6 optimization flags, the corrupt WINTEL practices stemmed from early 90ties. Office machines didn't even have 100MHz capable SDRAM modules to even be able to OC, nor the older chipset was capable of it, maybe FSB83 with funky dividers breaking everything except Voodoos, and then that's not a office machine anymore. Chipsets having proper dividers came later and still sucked thou. Also, not all celeries actually did 100FSB... you had to cherry pick them.
K6 300MHz cost 100$ more than Celeron 300A, K6-2 300MHz cost 130$ more.
Ferrum MasterUntil first SLOT1 PIII Katmai came in 440GXs(yes exactly dual GX), witch did 600MHz also(cache included), but only in latter autumn first Coppermine came and become the basic norm for any machine including much needed instruction sets.
KNI was not supported in software for years, and SSE in general wasn't very popular. Only until AMD64 made SSE2 mandatory it became... well... a standard.
Ferrum MasterI kinda understand this is a tech enthusiast site, but in reality this CPU was trash anywhere you encountered it, and you have to be ready with two times slower install/servicing times.
If benchmark results won't convince you then I don't know what will. While I didn't have a 300A, I had a Celeron 366 which ran at 450MHz just fine. The 300A, and the entire series, were easily able to hit performance of CPUs 4-5x more expensive with OC, which is my original point.
Posted on Reply
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