Wednesday, March 15th 2017

AMD Announces the Ryzen 5 Series 6-core and 4-core Desktop Processors

Following the successful introduction of AMD Ryzen 7 desktop processors including record pre-orders and award-winning performance, AMD today announced Ryzen 5 desktop processors will launch worldwide on April 11, 2017, offering disruptive price-to-performance for gamers and creators. With end users at the heart of everything AMD does, the new Ryzen 5 processors feature the powerful and efficient "Zen" architecture in 6-core,12-thread as well as 4-core, 8-thread options, to deliver enhanced performance, immersive experiences and high performance innovation to gamers and consumers worldwide with a price range of $169 to $249 USD SEP.

"Ryzen will ultimately bring innovation and competition to virtually every segment of the PC market, and Ryzen 5 is the next big step on that journey, designed to achieve new levels of compute performance for millions of PC users," said Jim Anderson, senior vice president and general manager, Computing and Graphics Group, AMD. "AMD reinvigorated the high-performance desktop market with Ryzen 7 earlier this month, and AMD Ryzen 5 now brings the power and efficiency of the 'Zen' core to users in the highly popular sub-$300 segment of the market."
Ryzen 5 Performance and Lineup
During an event today in Beijing, China for press, customers, and partners, AMD outlined the AMD Ryzen 5 desktop processor lineup. AMD specifically designed these processors for performance desktop users, AAA-title and streaming gamers, and the new AM4 desktop platform. Featuring AMD SenseMI technology and impressive multi-tasking capabilities, the groundbreaking AMD Ryzen 5 adapts to consumers' needs with incredible responsiveness and performance. Previously, AMD demonstrated the Ryzen 5 1600X beating the Intel Core i5-7600K by 69 percent in CPU performance testing using Cinebench R15 multi-threaded.

Game Optimizations
With the announcement of the Ryzen 5 lineup, AMD reiterated its commitment to delivering excellent gaming performance to ensure existing and future game titles take full advantage of Ryzen.

"We are impressed by the technological evolution enabled by the Zen architecture, which was designed to keep pace now and well into the future as gaming, eSports and virtual reality experiences continually push the limits of devices," said Vlatko Andonov, president of Bethesda Softworks. "Working with an all-new microarchitecture, like that in the Ryzen family of processors, means that everyone has the opportunity to raise their game and bring the very best interactive experiences to players. All of us at Bethesda are excited about working with AMD to keep evolving the premium performance that Ryzen offers."

Ryzen 5 Processor and Platform Availability
Availability for all four Ryzen 5 models begins April 11 at etailers around the world. All Ryzen processors support the new AM4 infrastructure, with motherboard designs being produced from top ODMs. Announced at CES 2017, AMD and its motherboard partners already debuted a wide array of new motherboards from ASRock, Asus, Biostar, Gigabyte, and MSI, all built upon the following desktop chipsets for AMD Ryzen processors -- the X370, B350 and the A320, the latter intended for mainstream PCs at new, consumer-friendly price points.
New Coolers
The AMD Ryzen 5 lineup also includes new Wraith coolers, including the Wraith Spire and the Wraith Stealth, available with select AMD Ryzen processors. These new AMD thermal solutions are designed to provide near-silent operation, with unique styling and superb cooling.
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18 Comments on AMD Announces the Ryzen 5 Series 6-core and 4-core Desktop Processors

#1
Melvis
Boost clock all cores or again only 1 core?
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#2
Jism
The 1600x looks like a good model compared to the 1090T. 6 cores, 12 threads and a max turbo of 4GHz. Nice.
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#3
ruff0r
Melvis said:
Boost clock all cores or again only 1 core?
If they going to do it like with R7 . Boost to 4ghz on one core load. Base clock on all core loads.
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#4
Lionheart
Fantastic prices & all but I hope it has better overclocking support than R7
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#5
ZoneDymo
ya know, that unlocked banner is a little hilarious now that we know these processors dont overclock worth a damn.
Not hating, I would love to upgrade to an 1800x right now, but still
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#6
Hotobu
Got my eyes on the 1600X. If it boosts to 4.0 Fingers crossed that it can get to 4.2. I see this as a nice gaming alternative to the 7700 K. Not QUITE as fast, but it's got the extra two cores and is about 60% of the price. Yes please.
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#7
deemon
How is the CCX distribution on the R5 CPUs? 6 cores as 4+2 or 3+3?
And on the 4 core parts? all 4 in one or 2+2? or some even weirder 3+1?
Posted on Reply
#8
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
deemon said:
How is the CCX distribution on the R5 CPUs? 6 cores as 4+2 or 3+3?
And on the 4 core parts? all 4 in one or 2+2? or some even weirder 3+1?
On six-core parts, it could be 3+3, on quad-core parts it is 4+0.
Posted on Reply
#9
pky
Melvis said:
Boost clock all cores or again only 1 core?
Why would you think the boost would be for all cores? When was there ever a desktop CPU (AMD or Intel) that boosted all cores to the max boost frequency?

If you want all cores at a higher clock speed - OC the chip.
Posted on Reply
#10
Melvis
pky said:
Why would you think the boost would be for all cores? When was there ever a desktop CPU (AMD or Intel) that boosted all cores to the max boost frequency?

If you want all cores at a higher clock speed - OC the chip.
Pretty much all 4 core CPU's from the past 10yrs?

Bulldozer would boost 4 cores to max boost out of the 8 cores
Posted on Reply
#11
Dethroy
I've updated my Google spreadsheet accordingly ...
Cell B2: choose the CPU you'd like to compare
Cell D9: choose either all-core performance or dual core performance


Posted on Reply
#13
Vayra86
Melvis said:
Pretty much all 4 core CPU's from the past 10yrs?

Bulldozer would boost 4 cores to max boost out of the 8 cores
None of the Intel CPUs boost on all 4 cores to the same clock. They lose 100 - 200 mhz when your application uses 3 or 4 cores respectively.

If anything Bulldzoer is the exception to the rule.

About the above benchmarks; 7700K can achieve a 25% higher clock (5Ghz) AND still leads by as much as 5-10% (sometimes even better) at the same clock as Ryzen... Its nice as a like-for-like comparison but it says literally nothing about the real world performance of the 7700K. All it really shows us is that the IPC of Ryzen is still a good 10% below Kaby.
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#14
dreamer2908
deemon said:
How is the CCX distribution on the R5 CPUs? 6 cores as 4+2 or 3+3?
And on the 4 core parts? all 4 in one or 2+2? or some even weirder 3+1?
From AnandTech,
We have confirmation from AMD that there are no silly games going to be played with Ryzen 5. The six-core parts will be a strict 3+3 combination, while the four-core parts will use 2+2. This will be true across all CPUs, ensuring a consistent performance throughout.
Posted on Reply
#15
Dalai Brahma
dreamer2908 said:
From AnandTech,
This disgust me...At least R3 / R5 4c / 8t could be 4 + 0 (1 ccx only)...
Posted on Reply
#16
Kanan
Vayra86 said:
All it really shows us is that the IPC of Ryzen is still a good 10% below Kaby.
10% at best. From where AMD comes that's a great achievement, and yet you always sound critical and negative about such positive things.

If you can stress that Kaby Lake is in "real world" higher clocked, and it shows "nothing", then stress too, that the Ryzen 1800X is a 8 core and will easily destroy the 7700K 4 core in the soon enough future. The comparison is laughable, because Intels own 8 core loses against the 7700K too, but no one would replace his 5960X/6900K with an 7700K, the same goes with Ryzen 1800X. That 7700K is barely faster than my 3960X if at all. Those 5960X/6900K, overclocked on the same 4500MHz as my CPU, will easily destroy the 7700K. There's really no reason to defend the 7700K. Ryzen revision 2 (no, not Ryzen II, just rev 2), which will probably have better yield and thus higher clocks will win against 7700K too, even without high core utilization, it simply needs higher clocks and those will be delivered in time (at least for overclockers).
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#17
Fourstaff
Ryzen 1400 at $169 sounds like its going to be king of mid range gaming.
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#18
Totally
geon2k2 said:
Just stumbled on a review from which I don't understand anything by the way, but I think these guys just did a 4 core 8 thread review of the Ryzen and 4 Ghz to 4Ghz comparison to i7 7700K and the results show them neck to neck (except FarCry for some reason, even though ~100 fps is great), with the Ryzen obviously being sensibly cheaper.

http://www.zolkorn.com/reviews/amd-ryzen-7-1800x-vs-intel-core-i7-7700k-mhz-by-mhz-core-by-core/view-all/
What GPU were they using, looks like they hit a bottleneck. Look at TPU's 1800 review the two chips do the same thing at with graphics maxed at 2560x1440
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