Monday, October 15th 2018

Intel 9th Gen LGA1151 Processors Support Up to 128GB of Memory

Intel's 6-core "Coffee Lake" die was essentially a "Kaby Lake" die with two extra cores, and no physical changes to other components, such as iGPU or uncore. With its new 8-core "Coffee Lake" Refresh silicon, Intel has turned its attention to not just increasing the core-count, but also improving the processor's integrated memory controller, in addition to hardware fixes to certain security vulnerabilities. The 128-bit wide (dual-channel) integrated memory controller now supports up to 128 GB of memory. Intel's current DDR4-capable mainstream desktop processors only support up to 64 GB, as do rival AMD's Ryzen socket AM4 processors.

Support for up to 128 GB explains the emergence of off-spec memory standards such as ASUS' Double Capacity (DC) DIMMs. Samsung is ready with a JEDEC-compliant 32 GB dual-rank UDIMM memory module for client platforms. Introduction of 32 GB UDIMMs also comes amidst reports of DRAM pricing cool-off through 2019, which could make 32 GB dual-channel memory kits consisting of two 16 GB UDIMMs more affordable. The increase in maximum memory amount could also indicate Intel's seriousness to introduce 3D Xpoint-based Optane Persistent Memory modules as alternatives to DRAM-based main memory, with higher capacities compensating for worse latencies and data-rates compared to DRAM.
Source: AnandTech
Add your own comment

25 Comments on Intel 9th Gen LGA1151 Processors Support Up to 128GB of Memory

#1
DeathtoGnomes
Thats a lot of memory for home PC's. I cant see AMD answering soon enough
Posted on Reply
#2
jmcslob
Thinking it will be obsolete before a home user might need that kind of memory.
Posted on Reply
#3
lexluthermiester
While this is an improvement to the platform, it likely will be useful only in workstation applications. Most consumer needs are served well by no more than 32GB.
Posted on Reply
#4
Cybrnook2002
(For the enthusiasts side) Ark still shows 64GB for the 9900k (same as 8700k):




And even if so, where do you even get consumer based 2 x 64GB enthusiast kits? Doesn't seem too exciting, and something more to just fall on deaf ears.
Posted on Reply
#5
windwhirl
A RAM drive is the only use that comes to mind that doesn't benefit from many-core CPUs, to justify buying such massive amounts of memory for a MSDT system.
Posted on Reply
#6
HTC
"jmcslob said:
Thinking it will be obsolete before a home user might need that kind of memory.
Unless you're @xkm1948 and need it for "home use" ...
Posted on Reply
#7
StrayKAT
"windwhirl said:
A RAM drive is the only use that comes to mind that doesn't benefit from many-core CPUs, to justify buying such massive amounts of memory for a MSDT system.
I haven't even utilized it on my HEDT. Heh. It's the price of another machine.

edit: A damn eyesore looking at all of my empty RAM slots though.
Posted on Reply
#8
Xx Tek Tip xX
"StrayKAT said:
edit: A damn eyesore looking at all of my empty RAM slots though.
Same, I can only run 4 8gb modules at the moment since I've been on a 7740x @ 5ghz delidded for ages - I've been holding out for that skylake refresh and the funds to upgrade.
Posted on Reply
#9
lexluthermiester
"windwhirl said:
A RAM drive is the only use that comes to mind
Very reasonable point, however that is still not a common consumer based usage scenario.
Posted on Reply
#11
StrayKAT
"Xx Tek Tip xX said:
Same, I can only run 4 8gb modules at the moment since I've been on a 7740x @ 5ghz delidded for ages - I've been holding out for that skylake refresh and the funds to upgrade.
Just have 2 8gb's here. I didn't know a refresh was coming though. I almost thought I wasted a lot of money on x299, when they announced the new 300 and x599 series.. but it looks like those are still a ways off.
Posted on Reply
#12
HTC
"Xx Tek Tip xX said:
*home use involves running 20 crysis 3's at once
Apparently, he'd be running 256GB RAM if he could, if not more.

I don't know how many copies of Crysis 3 he has, though ... so there's that ...
Posted on Reply
#13
xkm1948
"HTC said:
Apparently, he'd be running 256GB RAM if he could, if not more.

I don't know how many copies of Crysis 3 he has, though ... so there's that ...
Editing 3 copies of human genome maybe. I don’t play Crysis, not anymore
Posted on Reply
#14
HTC
"xkm1948 said:
Editing 3 copies of human genome maybe. I don’t play Crysis, not anymore
It was sarcastic, ofc ...

On a more serious note, if RAM prices weren't so obscene and your build could support it, would you get 512GB RAM?

As for the topic, i'm guessing very rarely will a user require such a huge amount of RAM: on a different platform (server like) it's an completely different story, though.
Posted on Reply
#15
efikkan
I assume the height of Asus' double height DIMMs is due to heat. registered DIMMs already have these amounts of chips on smaller DIMMs. I hope JEDEC compliant modules will be closer to standard height.
Posted on Reply
#16
StrayKAT
"HTC said:
It was sarcastic, ofc ...

On a more serious note, if RAM prices weren't so obscene and your build could support it, would you get 512GB RAM?

As for the topic, i'm guessing very rarely will a user require such a huge amount of RAM: on a different platform (server like) it's an completely different story, though.
I wouldn't. To me, the weak link is always and forever a GPU. And software. For gaming and light creative stuff I do, I already feel like 16GB is enough for RAM.. and CPU's in general are more than enough.
Posted on Reply
#17
efikkan
"StrayKAT said:
I wouldn't. To me, the weak link is always and forever a GPU. And software. For gaming and light creative stuff I do, I already feel like 16GB is enough for RAM.. and CPU's in general are more than enough.
Really? I guess it depends on what you're doing on the machine. 16 GB is probably fine for gaming, but now as even web browsers eat memory like crazy, 16 GB easily falls a little short.
Posted on Reply
#18
StrayKAT
"efikkan said:
Really? I guess it depends on what you're doing on the machine. 16 GB is probably fine for gaming, but now as even web browsers eat memory like crazy, 16 GB easily falls a little short.
Yeah, it's mostly gaming I have in mind.

I've never been one to have a bunch of tabs on my browser. I think I'm stuck in the 90s, as far as that goes.
Posted on Reply
#19
xkm1948
"HTC said:
It was sarcastic, ofc ...

On a more serious note, if RAM prices weren't so obscene and your build could support it, would you get 512GB RAM?

As for the topic, i'm guessing very rarely will a user require such a huge amount of RAM: on a different platform (server like) it's an completely different story, though.
Not for UDIMM.

Any ram over 128GB i must use ECC RDIMM. Data is more valuable.
Posted on Reply
#20
Assimilator
So now Intel has a consumer CPU range (Coffee Lake) that supports more memory than its entry-level prosumer/workstation CPU range (Xeon E3 @ 64GB). Go go gadget product segmentation fail!
Posted on Reply
#21
StrayKAT
"Assimilator said:
So now Intel has a consumer CPU range (Coffee Lake) that supports more memory than its entry-level prosumer/workstation CPU range (Xeon E3 @ 64GB). Go go gadget product segmentation fail!
It's a little outdated, but I guess this answers that somewhat:

Why Intel Created The C232 And C236 Workstation Chipsets

https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-c232-c236-chipsets-xeon,31051.html
Posted on Reply
#22
efikkan
"xkm1948 said:

Any ram over 128GB i must use ECC RDIMM. Data is more valuable.
Capacity itself is no reason to use ECC, and I haven't seen data to show that higher capacity chips have higher risk of errors. But more DIMMs or multi-rank DIMMs certainly increase the risk of errors. Personally I would strongly consider ECC for a workstation though.

I do think the segmentation of Skylake-X and Xeon-W is unnecessary though; two workstation platforms with very similar features. AMD did at least make a smarter choice in this instance.
Posted on Reply
#23
Fierce Guppy
"lexluthermiester said:
While this is an improvement to the platform, it likely will be useful only in workstation applications. Most consumer needs are served well by no more than 32GB.
When the Rampage V Extreme motherboard was introduced, it didn't support 128GB. A BIOS arrived a few months later that enabled support for 128GB. I was thinking holy cr_p; didn't know my i7-5960X could see that much RAM! It was a nice surprise, but I only need 16GB. I know that there are some people on the Asus forum with 128GB installed. Perhaps all Extreme series CPUs support 128GB.
Posted on Reply
#24
Prima.Vera
If you need more than 32GB of RAM (16 actually...) then you are on the wrong platform ;)
Posted on Reply
#25
cyneater
Probably need to sell you kidney to get that much memory with today prices.

32 is nice. 64 would be better...
mainly needed for models and simulation.
Then again dual CPU and 128 would be nice.... one day maybe
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment