Friday, October 4th 2019

Intel 10th Gen Core X "Cascade Lake-X" Pricing and Specs Detailed

Ahead of their October 7th product launch and November availability, we have confirmation of the specifications and pricing of Intel's 10th generation Core X "Cascade Lake-X" HEDT processors in the LGA2066 package. These chips feature compatibility with existing socket LGA2066 motherboards with a UEFI BIOS update, although several motherboard manufacturers are launching new products with some of the latest connectivity options, such as 2.5 GbE wired Ethernet, and 802.11ax Wi-Fi 6 WLAN.

The 10th generation Core X HEDT processor family is based on the new 14 nm++ "Cascade Lake" silicon, which comes with hardware fixes against several classes side-channel vulnerabilities, and introduces an updated instruction-set that includes more AVX-512 instructions, and the new DLBoost instruction. DLBoost leverages new fixed-function hardware on silicon to accelerate AI deep-learning neural-set building and training by up to 5 times. Intel's first wave of 10th gen Core X lineup is rather slim, with just four processor models. The company did away with the Core i7 brand extension, as core-counts in the mainstream desktop segment have already reached 8-core. The lineup now begins at 10-core/20-thread, with the chip's full 48-lane PCI-Express and 4-channel DDR4 interfaces enabled across the board. All models feature the "XE" brand extension, and feature unlocked base-clock multipliers.
The Core i9-10900XE is your gateway to the series. This 10-core/20-thread chip comes with a fascinating price-tag of just USD $590, a significant drop from the $999 price for the previous-generation 10-core chip, the i9-9900X. It's clocked higher, with 3.70 GHz nominal, 4.50 GHz Turbo Boost 2.0, 4.70 GHz Turbo Boost Max 3.0 and 4.30 GHz all-core Turbo. The chip is endowed with 1 MB of dedicated L2 cache per core, and 19.25 MB of shared L3 cache.

The Core i9-10920XE is a $689 12-core/24-thread chip priced under AMD's upcoming flagship AM4 model, the Ryzen 9 3950X. It's marginally faster than its predecessor, the i9-9920X, with 3.50 GHz base clocks (same), 4.60 GHz Turbo Boost 2.0, 4.80 GHz Turbo Boost Max 3.0, and 4.30 GHz all-core turbo. Interestingly, the increase in core-count doesn't bring additional L3 cache, you get the same 19.25 MB.

The next step in this series is the $784 Core i9-10940XE, a 14-core/28-thread processor clocked at 3.30 GHz, with 4.60 GHz Turbo Boost 2.0, 4.80 GHz Turbo Boost Max 3.0, and 4.10 GHz all-core turbo. Yet again, you get just 19.25 MB of shared L3 cache. Interestingly, Intel did not plan a 16-core/32-thread model in this series, you jump straight to the flagship.

Leading the pack is the Core i9-10980XE, an 18-core/36-thread processor priced at a mouth-watering $979, which is less than half that of the previous-generation Core i9-9980XE. It ticks at 3.00 GHz, with 4.60 GHz Turbo Boost 2.0, 4.80 GHz Turbo Boost Max 3.0, and 3.80 GHz all-core turbo. You get a larger 24.75 MB of shared L3 cache. All four chips have their TDP rated at 165 W.
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124 Comments on Intel 10th Gen Core X "Cascade Lake-X" Pricing and Specs Detailed

#1
ratirt
very impressive Intel. Price tags are pretty low considering how it looked over the passed few years. Anyway the boost clocks for all cores are lower a bit.
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#2
1d10t
1d10t, post: 4104118, member: 110464"
I recall earlier these year there's some leaks, or sort of , a 4Ghz based with fewer core and whooping TDP. Unless Intel managed to refined that, I'm highly doubt they can pull even 3.8Ghz based on 10 core :rolleyes:
While I partially agree on that "mainstream market needs more than 8 cores for now", is it nice to have an option? I mean in dark ages you need 2 rigs for same task, now it can be done faster in just 1 rig. 12 core on mainstream is a god send for us "budget professional" :D
On core part, I believe we already reaching peak single core MIPS, don't see any big leap since Athlon64 FX-53, thus adding more core or another threads is more feasible.
Don't think I have a good hunch :laugh:
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#3
ZoneDymo
ratirt, post: 4127140, member: 165024"
very impressive Intel. Price tags are pretty low considering how it looked over the passed few years. Anyway the boost clocks for all cores are lower a bit.
what impresses you about this?
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#4
Gungar
ZoneDymo, post: 4127150, member: 66089"
what impresses you about this?
784 dollars for 14 cores that's nearly AMD pricing. That's very impressive.
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#5
ratirt
ZoneDymo, post: 4127150, member: 66089"
what impresses you about this?
Basically low price. You don't see that from Intel very often. Well, that's about it.
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#6
ncrs
Gungar, post: 4127152, member: 163163"
784 dollars for 14 cores that's nearly AMD pricing. That's very impressive.
Too bad it doesn't have the features that AMD does... No ECC support is just pathetic at this point.
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#7
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
Ryzen 3rd gen has them beat across the board: lower price ($189 less for 12-core, but there seems to be some retailer gouging on the AMD side so realistically ~$100 less), more total cache (Ryzen has 64 MB L3), higher base clock speeds, lower wattage (105 versus 165).
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#8
Vayra86
XE Turbo Boost Max ultra super duper.... still same shit different name.

Well done. So Intel now learns how to apply discounts. Let's see if they can un-miss the boat with that... lol
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#9
ZoneDymo
Gungar, post: 4127152, member: 163163"
784 dollars for 14 cores that's nearly AMD pricing. That's very impressive.
I mean, better pricing then the price gauging going on before (like Nvidia is doing atm) is good yes... but its odd to use the word "impressive" for it imo.
I mean, they are still making a lot of profit on these so why would you be impressed by them asking less money then they were before?
I guess you could be impressed by AMD to actually force Intel to start cutting down their prices?

Not trying to make it a whole debate though, but for example imo it would be impressive if they could do those 14 cores while consuming less power then a 9700k or something, that would be a technological leap, that would be impressive.

anywho, moving on :p
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#10
ratirt
ZoneDymo, post: 4127179, member: 66089"
I mean, better pricing then the price gauging going on before (like Nvidia is doing atm) is good yes... but its odd to use the word "impressive" for it imo.
I mean, they are still making a lot of profit on these so why would you be impressed by them asking less money then they were before?
I guess you could be impressed by AMD to actually force Intel to start cutting down their prices?

Not trying to make it a whole debate though, but for example imo it would be impressive if they could do those 14 cores while consuming less power then a 9700k or something, that would be a technological leap, that would be impressive.

anywho, moving on :p
In comparison to previous Intel gen (10 core) it is impressive price drop. $400 is quite a lot and for me that is impressive no matter how much cash Intel will be making on the sales of these processors.
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#11
ChosenName
ratirt, post: 4127140, member: 165024"
very impressive Intel. Price tags are pretty low considering how it looked over the passed few years. Anyway the boost clocks for all cores are lower a bit.
.... don't forget to add on the price of the required new motherboard....
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#12
Vayra86
ratirt, post: 4127184, member: 165024"
In comparison to previous Intel gen (10 core) it is impressive price drop. $400 is quite a lot and for me that is impressive no matter how much cash Intel will be making on the sales of these processors.
Its a bit like calling the next Apple Iphone 'impressive' for costing 600 bucks this year instead of 1000 ;)

I guess now we know how high the Intel tax has been all these years :) They've lost the brand image that allowed them to charge these obscene numbers, and this is what's left. Mind you, its still not competitive :P
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#13
chaosmassive
Intel slash their price tag on the CPU this significant means that Intel afford to lose that margin
in order to stay relevant in the game.
make no mistake, Intel still gaining profit even after cutting the price by almost half.
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#14
Valantar
ratirt, post: 4127140, member: 165024"
very impressive Intel. Price tags are pretty low considering how it looked over the passed few years. Anyway the boost clocks for all cores are lower a bit.
"Impressive" is the wrong word. If someone you know has been kneeing you in the guts every time you meet for the past decade, but suddenly stops, that isn't impressive but rather that person finally not being an utter asshole. We should all be very thankful to AMD for making Intel price their products within the realms of reality rather than some fantasy land where $2000 CPUs are somehow okay.
ChosenName, post: 4127187, member: 172973"
.... don't forget to add on the price of the required new motherboard....
Actually these work on existing X299 motherboards(!!!!!). If only Intel would do that for MSDT CPUs - after all they're on their third incompatible platform for the same damn architecture by now, on the same socket, with only firmware locks enforcing incompatibility. Intel isn't a nice company.
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#15
Melvis
Well done AMD well done!
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#16
ratirt
ChosenName, post: 4127187, member: 172973"
.... don't forget to add on the price of the required new motherboard....
I'm talking about the CPU in comparison to previous generation not the motherboard.
Valantar, post: 4127193, member: 171585"
"Impressive" is the wrong word. If someone you know has been kneeing you in the guts every time you meet for the past decade, but suddenly stops, that isn't impressive but rather that person finally not being an utter asshole. We should all be very thankful to AMD for making Intel price their products within the realms of reality rather than some fantasy land where $2000 CPUs are somehow okay.
Vayra86, post: 4127190, member: 152404"
Its a bit like calling the next Apple Iphone 'impressive' for costing 600 bucks this year instead of 1000
I think you don't understand. The price cut is impressive not the price itself or the product. I still wouldn't buy it anyway. 40% off is impressive but the price itself not really.

And yeah. Intel's prices for the CPUs where off the charts for a long time. This one is a great example.
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#17
bonehead123
Say what you will, but any time the prices for new pc hardware goes down, even a little, even with minimal improvements in the overall/underlying tech or specs, it IS a win-win for the end users, yes ?

I do feel like most others here though, that Intel has been been taking full advantage of the lack of competition for a l..o..n..g time now, and I like it that they are now being forced to face the music :)
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#18
john_
1d10t, post: 4127147, member: 110464"
Don't think I have a good hunch :laugh:
Maybe you have. We don't know the REAL TDP of that 10 core CPU.
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#19
Valantar
ratirt, post: 4127202, member: 165024"
I think you don't understand. The price cut is impressive not the price itself or the product. I still wouldn't buy it anyway. 40% off is impressive but the price itself not really.
That's the thing - "impressive" implies that the person/entity doing the action in question (in this case: launching a new lineup of HEDT CPUs at around 50% off) is doing something laudable and positive. Returning to the status quo from insanity is not positive, it is simply no longer negative. Hence my analogy. No longer doing a shitty thing is not the same as doing a nice thing. Intel does in no way deserve credit for no longer fleecing their customers - at best they deserve the very minor recognition that they seem to understand just how weak their competitive positioning currently is. Which is in no way impressive, just a demonstration of the barest minimum of self-awareness and basic common sense. You don't congratulate people or call them "impressive" for getting out of a burning house.
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#20
ratirt
Valantar, post: 4127214, member: 171585"
That's the thing - "impressive" implies that the person/entity doing the action in question (in this case: launching a new lineup of HEDT CPUs at around 50% off) is doing something laudable and positive. Returning to the status quo from insanity is not positive, it is simply no longer negative. Hence my analogy. No longer doing a shitty thing is not the same as doing a nice thing. Intel does in no way deserve credit for no longer fleecing their customers - at best they deserve the very minor recognition that they seem to understand just how weak their competitive positioning currently is. Which is in no way impressive, just a demonstration of the barest minimum of self-awareness and basic common sense. You don't congratulate people or call them "impressive" for getting out of a burning house.
You sound like you are humanizing Intel and thus go your analogy. More like positive or negative behavior towards other people coming back from being insane. Sure it is bad to jack up the price and sell it when there is not other choice. The thing is there is a choice.
From my standpoint, price cuts are positive and this one over 40% off is impressive. Intel is doing something positive because the prices are cut so that is good. Isn't it? You don't call people impressive for getting into a burning house either.
Impressive as an adjective can refer, to objects or an event, situation not just people like you describe it thus impressive price cut. Acknowledgment of the impressive actions taking place not giving a credit or seeing Intel as a credible one due to price cut because I don't care about the product.
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#21
Valantar
ratirt, post: 4127226, member: 165024"
You sound like you are humanizing Intel and thus go your analogy. More like positive or negative behavior towards other people coming back from being insane. Sure it is bad to jack up the price and sell it when there is not other choice. The thing is there is a choice.
From my standpoint, price cuts are positive and this one over 40% off is impressive. Intel is doing something positive because the prices are cut so that is good. Isn't it? You don't call people impressive for getting into a burning house either.
Impressive as an adjective can refer, to objects or an event, situation not just people like you describe it thus impressive price cut. Acknowledgment of the impressive actions taking place not giving a credit or seeing Intel as a credible one due to price cut because I don't care about the product.
Humanizing? No. Intel as a corporation is just as capable of acting - and thus acting in certain ways, with certain intentions - as any person. The ability to act is not something limited to only people. The issue with your logic is that your point of reference for whether the action is positive/impressive is defined by Intel rather than a separate and more neutral-like point of reference (such as a general idea of sensible CPU price and price/perf development over time), which also has the side effect of being ahistorical and lacking in perspective. Subsequent actions are not separate, so lowering prices after first jacking them up is not good, it is simply a correction of previous wrongdoing. You calling this "impressive" serves to erase the previous wrongdoing (as current actions are generally seen as more relevant and defining of character) which is a degree of slack I see no reason to cut Intel at this point. Hence my original analogy. Stopping a bad practice that you yourself have instigated and maintained is not good, it is simply no longer bad. There is a (big!) difference. The only context in which these price cuts are impressive is an utter lack of context. The only reason Intel did this is because they set their own damn house on fire and are now seeing that it might be sensible to leave. You say there is a choice - yes, Intel made the choice to jack up HEDT CPU prices to entirely ridiculous levels for no reason beyond padding their own margins. They are thus responsible for those actions, and should be regarded as though those actions were intentional and thought-through. What you are arguing for is ignoring this entirely, and instead rewarding and praising them for no longer being complete assholes. The thing is: they still are - they have done nothing to earn the favor of consumers beyond no longer price gouging. To earn consumer favor they need to go significantly beyond this - by undercutting AMD or otherwise delivering something more than what can be reasonably expected.
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#23
ratirt
Valantar, post: 4127247, member: 171585"
The issue with your logic is that your point of reference for whether the action is positive/impressive is defined by Intel rather than a separate and more neutral-like point of reference (
There is not issue with my logic. The price drop is impressive and that's a positive thing. For the record if something/someone deserves a credit for this price drop is not Intel but AMD. So your statement positive/impressive defined by Intel rather than a separate and more neutral-like makes no sense.
It was not a wrongdoing. I didn't buy Intel because I knew the price is too high. It's that simple.
Valantar, post: 4127247, member: 171585"
Intel made the choice to jack up HEDT CPU prices to entirely ridiculous levels for no reason beyond padding their own margins.
Stop seeing Intel as charity. It is a company and do not humanize the company again. This is business it has nothing to do with good feelings, right-doing or wrongdoing. The problem is not Intel jacking up the price but people still buying it and calling it worth the money. You don't need to look far for those people.
Valantar, post: 4127247, member: 171585"
You say there is a choice - yes, Intel made the choice to jack up HEDT CPU prices to entirely ridiculous levels for no reason beyond padding their own margin
The choice I mentioned refers to people. They have a choice not to go with Intel with it's ridiculous prices but AMD as an alternative not choice for Intel to lower the price.

Are you kidding me? Saying the price drop is impressive means I'm praising INTEL ? What the hell is wrong with you?
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#24
Darmok N Jalad
It’s a good move, but what is the total cost of entry if you are starting from scratch? Aren’t x299 boards really expensive? Cheapest I found at Microcenter is $309. The cheapest x570 at the same store is about half that price. The other concern is that I suspect TDP will be really high on these versus Ryzen.
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#25
Ashtr1x
Honestly seeing this extreme Whiteknighting AMD is so funny. Addressing a corporate by thanking LOL.

Guys AMD / Intel all and any company will raise prices and stagnate in innovation if there is no competition.

How about the AMD X570 board Premium ? $700+ for a Mainstream Mobo where each and every Processor behaves differently and just because they added PCIE gen 4. Its not automatically worth. They did it because DMI link on Intel was saturated and Gen 4 will give them huge up in Server area - NVMe SSDs are the reason and their EPYCs 128Lane advantage goes in hand when considering 2 socket Racks.

Again same for Nvidia, they ruined XX70 SKU silicon at first by relegating it to XX60 and disabling SLI/ NVlink. With Super you see the pricing ans SLI back. AMD 5700 stop gap until premium Navi hits in 2020. Its good but do not forget they all work for profits and not good Samaritan charity lmao.

I myself want to buy a new PC because BIOS EOL in 2020 but $700 for top end X570 sucks esp when Gen 4 lanes cant be split into Gen3 which makes the total x4 chipset lanes multiple and giving us huge advantage since Gen 4 SSDs are only currently used (see Der8aur on that on how useful they are) and Gen 3 X16 itself only maxed by 2080Ti at 4K high bandwidth. and no matter gen 3 or gen 2 the lanes will be eaten up once you plug it in the gen4 slot.

This is where the cheap X299 Mobo kicks in, EVGA X299 dark is very cheap now. I hope TRX40 is good platform.
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