Monday, December 9th 2019

ASUS Rolls Out Pro WS X299 SAGE II Motherboard

ASUS today rolled out the Pro WS X299 SAGE II, a redesign and refresh of its WS X299 SAGE series quasi-workstation motherboards, designed for those who want to use Intel's 10th generation Core XE "Cascade Lake-X" HEDT processors in a workstation-like environment (CEB form-factor) and can make do without ECC memory. The board draws power from a combination of 24-pin ATX and two 8-pin EPS power connectors, along with an optional 6-pin PCIe power input to stabilize add-on card power delivery. An 8-phase VRM conditions power for the socket LGA2066 processor. The board employs PLX PEX8747 bridge chips to convert two x16 PCIe gen 3.0 links from the LGA2066 processor to four PCI-Express 3.0 x16 slots with full bandwidth, or seven slots with x16/x8/x8/x8/x8/x8/x8 wiring.

Storage options on the ASUS Pro WS X299 SAGE II include three U.2 ports, two M.2 slots (one right below the PCH heatsink, and the other vertical); and eight SATA 6 Gbps ports. Network connectivity includes two 2.5 GbE interfaces driven by a pair of Intel i225-LM controllers. USB connectivity includes two USB 3.2 Gen 2 ports driven by an ASMedia controller (from which one is type-C), a second such controller driving an internal port, and eight USB 3.2 gen 1 ports from the X299 PCH. A high-grade onboard audio solution featuring Realtek S1220A HDA codec, headphones amp, ground-layer isolation, and audio-grade capacitors, make for the rest of this board. The company didn't reveal pricing.
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18 Comments on ASUS Rolls Out Pro WS X299 SAGE II Motherboard

#1
Solaris17
Dainty Moderator
btarunr
An 8-phase VRM
:ohwell: that sucks.
Posted on Reply
#2
dinmaster

we heard you like pci-e slots...
Posted on Reply
#3
EzioAs
I wish mainstream boards looks half as good as this, instead of you know, all the RGBs.
Posted on Reply
#6
cronicash
TheLostSwede
Because you linked to the old model...
Cheers didnt see that :D
Posted on Reply
#7
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
We need a non ROG board for TRX40. I miss when TUF was the exact Same as rog but without all the stupid rgb.
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#8
Bones
Looks cryptofabulous from here.
Imagine how many coins per day it could mine with the right cards.
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#9
notb
Solaris17
:ohwell: that sucks.
I don't think it does. It's just not a board for someone who wants to OC. And honestly, I doubt it's interesting for this group (RGB!!!!).

Of course this will not be a platform of choice for CPU-heavy loads, for OC, for gaming and so on. And it lacks ECC, so it's not for production systems as well.

But how many of these boards is Asus hoping to sell yearly? 10k?
There are 1 mln Kaggle users, with top few % using PCs that most high-end gamers haven't even seen live. And Asus just made a board for their next build.
You can put a bunch of big GPUs and fast SSDs on that and train neural networks or run engineering simulations 24/7 with just about any 10th gen CPU announced.
And it is a robust, stable platform. And software is optimized for these CPUs (lets not dive into discussing whether it's because of market demand or divine intervention).
And it's maintenance-free, so you don't have to be a geek to own one.

Sure, the value is pretty bad compared to other choices, but honestly: it's been true for all ASUS WS boards and they still sell pretty well. :)
Posted on Reply
#10
dj-electric
eidairaman1
We need a non ROG board for TRX40. I miss when TUF was the exact Same as rog but without all the stupid rgb.
Asus TRX40-Pro asks if he is a joke to you
Posted on Reply
#11
notb
dj-electric
Asus TRX40-Pro asks if he is a joke to you
It's not an equivalent.
Even if you peal off all RGB/OC/gaming things, ROG motherboards are still better equipped.
It's 2019. At over $400 TRX40-Pro doesn't provide WiFi nor BT.

PRIME X299-DELUXE II is noticeably better equipped.
Posted on Reply
#12
dj-electric
notb
PRIME X299-DELUXE II is noticeably better equipped.
There are reasons, of course. One being the fact that X299 economy has settled a long time ago, with the platform now existing over two years.
But, compered to a 30-40$ Wifi-BT add-in card you can add to the TRX40-Pro (there's even the dedicated socket for it), you cannot add PCIE 4.0 compatibility to X299, you can't add the lanes that come with this platform, you can't add the option to host a CPU that's up to X4 as powerful as a 10980XE (3990X).

Gotta weigh the positives and negatives between the two.
Posted on Reply
#13
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
Solaris17
:ohwell: that sucks.
Nah. The Rampage IV Extreme had an 8-phase VRM and my P9X79 Deluxe has a 16 phase VRM, but the Rampage overclocks better. The number of VRMs isn't the only factor that goes into determining VRM capabilities.
Posted on Reply
#14
notb
dj-electric
There are reasons, of course. One being the fact that X299 economy has settled a long time ago, with the platform now existing over two years.
?
This particular mobo launched at $499, so in the same segment. Not much changed.
... or I don't get your argument...
But, compered to a 30-40$ Wifi-BT add-in card you can add to the TRX40-Pro (there's even the dedicated socket for it), you cannot add PCIE 4.0 compatibility to X299, you can't add the lanes that come with this platform, you can't add the option to host a CPU that's up to X4 as powerful as a 10980XE (3990X).
Neither can I remove PCIe 4.0, which I'm forced to pay for with very little use cases at the moment.

More importantly: I don't know why you've moved to Intel vs AMD comparison.
Some X299 mobos have wireless, some don't. Same for sTRX4.
I've mentioned that board, because it's the same Asus series and roughly similar pricing.
For extra $50 you get WiFi 6, BT, WiGig, dual LAN (one 5Gb), dual Thunderbolt 3...
Sure, you can add many things with add-in cards, but what are you paying that $450 for?

Based on features alone TRX40-Pro is more like Prime X299-A II and that one is just $350.

I just don't understand why TRX40-Pro is so expensive...

And it's not like WiFi or BT are luxurious or niche features. They're included in majority of PCs sold today.
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#15
dj-electric
This is a matter of platform choice. There were "better equipped" boards of lower CPU potential \ connectivity in the past in many cases
You can say the same about low end X570 boards at the time a high end X470 board were available at a similar price

X299 board may be "better equipped" for the price of a lower end SKU on a higher end platform such as TRX40, it makes complete sense. Costs went into other places in the design
The comparison is not Intel to AMD, its X299 to TRX40.
Posted on Reply
#16
MadsMagnus
I made a machine based off the original WS X299 SAGE, with 7 1080 Ti's at the time. It worked, kinda.. After all the BIOS jiggery, the machine ran but the software my customer used didnt play nice with all 7 cards running at the same time. So he set it to run 4 cards and I eventually removed the 3 remaining cards over to a server :(
Posted on Reply
#17
ypsylon
I guess that's more problem with Winblows than board. You are asking for trouble every time when more than 4 physical GPU cores are present in the system.

But I concede that Asus boards are quirky to say the least. (running one right now ugh)

--

In truth this board with refreshed 48-lane processors should have been released in 2017 not right now. Out of curiosity: I don't get it why WS boards are without built-in I/O shields covers - they look nice and prevent dust build-up, seems that 'workstation folks' are unworthy of such practical items. But, seriously even me just itching to dump 1st gen TR which is a biach.

One TRX40 board I'm interested in is Gigabyte Designare. The only one which can be really called workstation board. You get TB3 connectivity out of the box. Almost non-existent amount of RGB (tiny little strip which can be disabled anyway). One thing which annoys me with all TR boards (all generations) is that 4 slot 16/8/16/8 configuration; without actual physical 7 or 8 slots (XL-ATX in case of Gigabyte boards) with lane switchers. For the price already I would pay extra for freedom of choice. Take that Designare I've mentioned. When you plug Titan-Ridge controller into x8 slot you wasting x4 lanes which cannot be assigned anywhere else. And that's a bummer for me when counting every PCIe lane available.
Posted on Reply
#18
MadsMagnus
ypsylon
I guess that's more problem with Winblows than board. You are asking for trouble every time when more than 4 physical GPU cores are present in the system.

But I concede that Asus boards are quirky to say the least. (running one right now ugh)

--

In truth this board with refreshed 48-lane processors should have been released in 2017 not right now. Out of curiosity: I don't get it why WS boards are without built-in I/O shields covers - they look nice and prevent dust build-up, seems that 'workstation folks' are unworthy of such practical items. But, seriously even me just itching to dump 1st gen TR which is a biach.

One TRX40 board I'm interested in is Gigabyte Designare. The only one which can be really called workstation board. You get TB3 connectivity out of the box. Almost non-existent amount of RGB (tiny little strip which can be disabled anyway). One thing which annoys me with all TR boards (all generations) is that 4 slot 16/8/16/8 configuration; without actual physical 7 or 8 slots (XL-ATX in case of Gigabyte boards) with lane switchers. For the price already I would pay extra for freedom of choice. Take that Designare I've mentioned. When you plug Titan-Ridge controller into x8 slot you wasting x4 lanes which cannot be assigned anywhere else. And that's a bummer for me when counting every PCIe lane available.
Do you imagine running Linux had been better? So its a medium between software and OS kernel that had a hard time handling the GPUs?
Posted on Reply
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