Wednesday, March 25th 2020

Samsung Announces Industry's First EUV DRAM with Shipment of First Million Modules

Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., the world leader in advanced memory technology, today announced that it has successfully shipped one million of the industry's first 10 nm-class (D1x) DDR4 (Double Date Rate 4) DRAM modules based on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) technology. The new EUV-based DRAM modules have completed global customer evaluations, and will open the door to more cutting-edge EUV process nodes for use in premium PC, mobile, enterprise server and datacenter applications.

"With the production of our new EUV-based DRAM, we are demonstrating our full commitment toward providing revolutionary DRAM solutions in support of our global IT customers," said Jung-bae Lee, executive vice president of DRAM Product & Technology at Samsung Electronics. "This major advancement underscores how we will continue contributing to global IT innovation through timely development of leading-edge process technologies and next-generation memory products for the premium memory market."
Samsung EUV DDR4
Samsung is the first to adopt EUV in DRAM production to overcome challenges in DRAM scaling. EUV technology reduces repetitive steps in multi-patterning and improves patterning accuracy, enabling enhanced performance and greater yields as well as shortened development time.

EUV will be fully deployed in Samsung's future generations of DRAM, starting with its fourth-generation 10 nm-class (D1a) or the highly-advanced 14 nm-class, DRAM. Samsung expects to begin volume production of D1a-based DDR5 and LPDDR5 next year, which would double manufacturing productivity of the 12-inch D1x wafers.

In line with the expansion of the DDR5/LPDDR5 market next year, the company will further strengthen its collaboration with leading IT customers and semiconductor vendors on optimizing standard specifications, as it accelerates the transition to DDR5/LPDDR5 throughout the memory market.

To better address the growing demand for next-generation premium DRAM, Samsung will start the operation of a second semiconductor fabrication line in Pyeongtaek, South Korea, within the second half of this year.

Timeline of Samsung DRAM Milestones
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18 Comments on Samsung Announces Industry's First EUV DRAM with Shipment of First Million Modules

#1
bonehead123
Well, this is all fine & dandy, now if they could just find a way to stop/reduce the increasingly outrageous prices of their SSD's, tablets, & phones, the world would be a better place :)
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#2
Fourstaff
bonehead123
Well, this is all fine & dandy, now if they could just find a way to stop/reduce the increasingly outrageous prices of their SSD's, tablets, & phones, the world would be a better place :)
We are getting more bang for buck year on year, I don't know what you are on about :confused:
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#3
kapone32
Fourstaff
We are getting more bang for buck year on year, I don't know what you are on about :confused:
That is not summarily true for Samsung. SSDs by some measure are affordable for 128 to 512 and you can get decent 1TB for decent prices but anything in the 2TB and up is minimum $300 for off brands and at least $400 for Samsung.
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#4
bonehead123
Sorry, I should have specified "SSD's" to mainly mean nvme's at 2TB or larger for more reasonable prices....but their larger SATA drives aren't that much better of a value either, relatively speaking..
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#5
ppn
Im waiting for the sub 10nm class namely the 0nm-class. 4-5nm would be fine. not that 16GB single sided isn't also fine.
but I really like the idea of 8x128GB modules of 8 channel memory.
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#6
Midland Dog
if it doesnt beat b-die then its Doa type die as far as anyone cares
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#7
TheLostSwede
Fourstaff
We are getting more bang for buck year on year, I don't know what you are on about :confused:
Not sure I agree when it comes to phones, they just cost more and more and you get diminishing returns in terms of features every year.
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#8
Fourstaff
kapone32
That is not summarily true for Samsung. SSDs by some measure are affordable for 128 to 512 and you can get decent 1TB for decent prices but anything in the 2TB and up is minimum $300 for off brands and at least $400 for Samsung.
Prices will come down in due time - not long ago we were struggling for cheap 1tb drives.
TheLostSwede
Not sure I agree when it comes to phones, they just cost more and more and you get diminishing returns in terms of features every year.
Samsung S9 launch price was ~$720, now you can get it for $430 in Newegg - how is that costing more? S10 prices are also dropping.
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#9
TheLostSwede
Fourstaff
Samsung S9 launch price was ~$720, now you can get it for $430 in Newegg - how is that costing more? S10 prices are also dropping.
Ok, sorry, but that's a flawed comparison.
The comparison is per each new generation, were the price has increased by $500 over two generations based on your launch price. Too me that's insane.
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#10
mahirzukic2
TheLostSwede
Ok, sorry, but that's a flawed comparison.
The comparison is per each new generation, were the price has increased by $500 over two generations based on your launch price. Too me that's insane.
That surely is INSANE.
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#11
Fourstaff
TheLostSwede
Ok, sorry, but that's a flawed comparison.
The comparison is per each new generation, were the price has increased by $500 over two generations based on your launch price. Too me that's insane.
If you are buying an improved product, surely you should be paying more for it? If you are not willing to pay for the improvement, you can still buy the same at a cheaper price. I don't understand why the price of each generation needs to be kept constant and provide a smaller incremental upgrade instead.
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#12
TheLostSwede
Fourstaff
If you are buying an improved product, surely you should be paying more for it? If you are not willing to pay for the improvement, you can still buy the same at a cheaper price. I don't understand why the price of each generation needs to be kept constant and provide a smaller incremental upgrade instead.
Tell me, is there a huge increase in any meaningful improvement from an S9 to an S20?
And can you justify the $4-500 increase in cost for that/those meaningful improvement(s)?
Every generation we seem to see an increase in cost of $100-250 for the equivalent device, yet we're not seeing much in terms of improvement from one generation to another any more.
This is obviously a limitation of how technology is being developed, but somehow the device makers seem to think that they can keep increasing the device prices each generation, by a substantial ammount.

I can't justify buying flagship phones from tier one makers, as they cost as much as a decent PC or laptop these days.
Good for you if you can, but it's gotten to the point where it really is diminishing returns for what you get for your money compared to what previous generation phones offered.

I don't get your argument here and you clearly don't want to try and understand my point, so maybe we just stop here?
Posted on Reply
#13
R0H1T
bonehead123
Well, this is all fine & dandy, now if they could just find a way to stop/reduce the increasingly outrageous prices of their SSD's, tablets, & phones, the world would be a better place :)
I think you'll find that DRAM & NAND makers will have to lower prices of their products, especially later in the year as demand takes a nosedive! But of course the govts will also have to bail out many of these corporations & in turn they'll reduce future capex & investments, that's how unfettered capitalism rolls.
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#14
lynx29
Fourstaff
We are getting more bang for buck year on year, I don't know what you are on about :confused:
I agree with Fourstaff, I bought a Samsung Galaxy A50 on sale for $179 a couple months ago, and it looks just as gorgeous as my brothers Note 10 screen and seems similar speed wise, though to be fair, I don't do much on it but youtube and netflix.
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#15
TheLostSwede
lynx29
I agree with Fourstaff, I bought a Samsung Galaxy A50 on sale for $179 a couple months ago, and it looks just as gorgeous as my brothers Note 10 screen and seems similar speed wise, though to be fair, I don't do much on it but youtube and netflix.
Well, in all fairness, the mid-range and entry segments are improving, in fact, a lot of mid-range phones today, are close to high-end phones 2-3 years ago in terms of features and performance.
My issue is with the high-end/flagship products that cost a small fortune these days. Just saw Huawei is expecting people to pay €1,399 for its new flagship phone... Personally I'd rather buy a new laptop for that kind of money.
Posted on Reply
#16
lynx29
TheLostSwede
Well, in all fairness, the mid-range and entry segments are improving, in fact, a lot of mid-range phones today, are close to high-end phones 2-3 years ago in terms of features and performance.
My issue is with the high-end/flagship products that cost a small fortune these days. Just saw Huawei is expecting people to pay €1,399 for its new flagship phone... Personally I'd rather buy a new laptop for that kind of money.
The only thing I care about is that the screen is AMOLED and looks gorgeous with a decent PPI, and doesn't lag in youtube or netflix and some basic gaming... the new final fantasy tactics variant just released on Android a couple days ago, I'm going to try that soon

Personally I am fine with mid-range, I see no reason why people need 8gb of ram in their phones, lol
Posted on Reply
#17
Fourstaff
TheLostSwede
Tell me, is there a huge increase in any meaningful improvement from an S9 to an S20?
And can you justify the $4-500 increase in cost for that/those meaningful improvement(s)?
Every generation we seem to see an increase in cost of $100-250 for the equivalent device, yet we're not seeing much in terms of improvement from one generation to another any more.
This is obviously a limitation of how technology is being developed, but somehow the device makers seem to think that they can keep increasing the device prices each generation, by a substantial ammount.

I can't justify buying flagship phones from tier one makers, as they cost as much as a decent PC or laptop these days.
Good for you if you can, but it's gotten to the point where it really is diminishing returns for what you get for your money compared to what previous generation phones offered.

I don't get your argument here and you clearly don't want to try and understand my point, so maybe we just stop here?
TheLostSwede
Well, in all fairness, the mid-range and entry segments are improving, in fact, a lot of mid-range phones today, are close to high-end phones 2-3 years ago in terms of features and performance.
My issue is with the high-end/flagship products that cost a small fortune these days. Just saw Huawei is expecting people to pay €1,399 for its new flagship phone... Personally I'd rather buy a new laptop for that kind of money.
You have articulated the points better than I have. We are at the point of diminishing returns, where each increase comes with massive price and little performance boost. Everyone is still pushing forward, so the prices increases exponentially (aided by the fact that the phones continue to sell as of last generation, generating boatloats of profits).

This happens in all industries: GeForce Titan X launched at $999 in 2015, an absurd amount of money (at that time). Less than 3 years later, there is market for Titan RTX at $2500 in 2018. Meanwhile, I can progress along xx60 range of cards (660Ti, 1660Ti, 2060, etc.) and get them for a few hundred dollars each, with increased performance over the years. Every so often, Nvidia changes its marketing stack - many people remember the xx60 line going from $200 to $3-400 and are still salty about it. Perhaps this is what you are feeling right now.

For your typical consumer, there is no longer any need to chase after the flagship phones. We can now shop around 2nd tier devices for cheap prices and still be plenty happy with the performance.
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#18
TheLostSwede
Not feeling salty, my point was simply that certain products are not giving consumer value for money. SSDs have never been so affordable, whereas as you pointed out, graphics cards have never been so expensive.

The phone market has a lot of competition though, but the prices are still going up. Apple and Samsung seems to be the ones asking for the most money when it comes to top tier hardware. My previous phone was a Nokia 8, which was pretty damn good for the money, but the design was a bit "old". I ended up getting the Asus Zenphone 6 this time, against by better judgement, but so far (knock on wood), they've delivered on updates, which might almost be a first for Asus. It's also been a pretty good phone for the money again. Both used "old" tech compared to other phones around the time of purchase, but I don't feel I've lost out in terms of functionality. Having lived on the "cutting edge" for so long when it comes to tech, it's sort of weird not getting the latest and greatest, but there really is no point in doing so, as it's in fact, a huge waste of money, imho.
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