Tuesday, March 30th 2021

MonsterLabo Plays Flight Simulator with The Beast, Achieves Fully-Fanless Gaming Experience

MonsterLabo, the maker of fanless PC cases designed for gaming with zero noise, has today tested its upcoming flagship offering in the case lineup. Called The Beast, the case is designed to handle high-end hardware with large TDPs and dissipate all that heat without any moving parts. Using only big heatsinks and heat pipes to transfer the heat to the big heatsink area. In a completely fanless configuration, the case can absorb and dissipate a CPU TDP of 150 Watts and a GPU TPD with 250 Watts. However, when equipped with two 140 mm fans running below 500 RPM, it can accommodate a 250 W CPU, and 320 W GPU. MonsterLabo has tested the fully fanless configuration, which was equipped with AMD Ryzen 7 3800XT processor, paired with NVIDIA's latest GeForce RTX 3080 Ampere graphics card.

There were no fans present in the system to help move the heat away, and the PC was being stress-tested using Microsoft's Flight Simulator. The company has posted a chart of CPU and GPU temperatures over time, where we see that the GPU has managed to hit about 75 degrees Celsius at one point. The CPU has remained a bit cooler, where the CPU package hit just above the 70-degree mark. Overall, the case is more than capable of cooling the hardware it was equipped with. By adding two slow-spinning fans, the temperatures would get even lower, however, that is no longer a fanless system. MonsterLabo's The Beast is expected to get shipped in Q3 of this year when reviewers will get their hands on it and test it for themselves. You can watch the videos in MonsterLabo's blog post here.
Source: MonsterLabo
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20 Comments on MonsterLabo Plays Flight Simulator with The Beast, Achieves Fully-Fanless Gaming Experience

#1
_JP_
Humbug, was hoping to have a picture showing the inside of the case, with that 400W heatsink showing (or any arrangement of smaller coupled heatsinks), without leaving this site. But they need traffic too. :)
Nonetheless this is impressive for the hardware it has and being used to Nofan being the go-to for these setups, or having to resort to lower wattage parts, this is a good step in the absolute silent direction!

@AleksandarK Minor observation ;) : the chart tops at 80ºC, so the card actually reached around 75ºC. (which makes it very impressive!)
EDIT: Saw the video and the gpu didn't trigger the limiter due to temperature, that's fantastic! The insides are not shown...HUMBUG!!
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#3
aktpu
I like how ghetto their setup is in the picture. It's like they didn't even bother to try
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#4
_JP_
@AleksandarK Thank you for the picture of the inside of the case!!!!



That thing is MASSIVE!! o_O
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#5
AleksandarK
_JP_
@AleksandarK Thank you for the picture of the inside of the case!!!!



That thing is MASSIVE!! o_O
LOL. Not a problem really :)
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#6
Wirko
Because it perfectly simulates the total silence in the cockpit of a real plane...
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#8
ZoneDymo
BSim500
I don't get it. The ambient noise of a cockpit often sounds exactly like a fan on high... Be funny if after all that effort he ended up adding all his fans back in again for increased realism... :D
I mean, id rather have the ambient noise coming from my headphones carefully sculpted by a sound engineer to sound as realistic as possible rather then a pc fan wizzing next to me.
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#9
BSim500
ZoneDymo
I mean, id rather have the ambient noise coming from my headphones carefully sculpted by a sound engineer to sound as realistic as possible rather then a pc fan wizzing next to me.
True, though real pilots don't get (or want) engine noise coming through their headphones, especially when talking to ATC. ;)
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#10
Valantar
Useless poll. "Great idea" and "It's going to flop" are not mutually exclusive. In this case, both are highly likely to be true.
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#11
HD64G
Both the CPU (70W from 140W) and GPU (220W from 350W) were heavily power limited, so they lose performance to make it work well and not overheat. Good choice for a 5600X and a not oced 3070 though.
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#12
Valantar
HD64G
Both the CPU (70W from 140W) and GPU (220W from 350W) were heavily power limited, so they lose performance to make it work well and not overheat. Good choice for a 5600X and a not oced 3070 though.
CPU is on auto; games very rarely come anywhere close to the CPU's power limit. Not suited for a 144W AMD CPU under rendering loads maybe, but gaming? Clearly.
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#13
DeathtoGnomes
I'd say 21C/71F ambient to be ideal temps, great for the PR show. In my neck of the woods, during the 'warm' season, we get a 30 degree swing in temps, as much as 40 on occasion. This type of case would be ok for the 8-9 months cool season, but once temps start hitting 90F here, we'd be forced to run the air conditioner full blast 24/7, and pay 3x the normal electricity, just to keep it from shutting down. So I'm not sure if thats a good trade off just to have silence for those 8 months, if you have a well paying job, I'm sure its nothing to you, just dont scream bloody murder at miners for wasting electricity.
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#14
Vanny
My old Zotac 2070 Mini with fans at full blast produced more realistic sounds for this scenario.
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#15
Valantar
DeathtoGnomes
I'd say 21C/71F ambient to be ideal temps, great for the PR show. In my neck of the woods, during the 'warm' season, we get a 30 degree swing in temps, as much as 40 on occasion. This type of case would be ok for the 8-9 months cool season, but once temps start hitting 90F here, we'd be forced to run the air conditioner full blast 24/7, and pay 3x the normal electricity, just to keep it from shutting down. So I'm not sure if thats a good trade off just to have silence for those 8 months, if you have a well paying job, I'm sure its nothing to you, just dont scream bloody murder at miners for wasting electricity.
Shutting down? PCs these days will just thermal throttle. I've seen what a Threadripper with a clogged water cooler (literally no flow at all) does - it chugs along rather happily at ~600MHz, temps in the high 90s, but never shuts down even under heavy load. Which, at those speeds, is pretty much anything of course.

But yeah, don't plan on a passively cooled case if you can't provide a reasonably cool environment for it. That's pretty much a given.
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#17
Wirko
Here's a good cooling solution for flight simulators: a 60-inch, three blade, up to ~2400 rpm fan behind the monitor. It's effective and stylish and makes all other fans in the same room redundant.
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#18
zlobby
Wirko
Here's a good cooling solution for flight simulators: a 60-inch, three blade, up to ~2400 rpm fan behind the monitor. It's effective and stylish and makes all other fans in the same room redundant.
Yes, preferrably hooked up to a Pratt or a Royce.
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#19
Caring1
I can't read that brand name without thinking Monster Labia. :slap:
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#20
zlobby
Caring1
I can't read that brand name without thinking Monster Labia. :slap:
Kekekeke! :D
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