Tuesday, June 15th 2021

Intel Ponte Vecchio GPU to Be Liquid Cooled Inside OAM Form Factor

Intel's upcoming Ponte Vecchio graphics card is set to be the company's most powerful processor ever designed, and the chip is indeed looking like an engineering marvel. From Intel's previous teasers, we have learned that Ponte Vecchio is built using 47 "magical tiles" or 47 dies which are responsible either for computing elements, Rambo Cache, Xe links, or something else. Today, we are getting a new piece of information coming from Igor's LAB, regarding the Ponte Vecchio and some of its design choices. For starters, the GPU will be a heterogeneous design that consists out of many different nodes. Some parts of the GPU will be manufactured on Intel's 10 nm SuperFin and 7 nm technologies, while others will use TSMC's 7 nm and 5 nm nodes. The smaller and more efficient nodes will probably be used for computing elements. Everything will be held together by Intel's EMIB and Foveros 3D packaging.

Next up, we have information that this massive Intel processor will be accountable for around 600 Watts of heat output, which is a lot to cool. That is why in the leaked renders, we see that Intel envisioned these processors to be liquid-cooled, which would make the cooling much easier and much more efficient compared to air cooling of such a high heat output. Another interesting thing is that the Ponte Vecchio is designed to fit inside OAM (OCP Accelerator Module) form factor, an alternative to the regular PCIe-based accelerators in data centers. OAM is used primarily by hyper scalers like Facebook, Amazon, Google, etc., so we imagine that Intel already knows its customers before the product even hits the market.
Source: Igor's LAB
Add your own comment

8 Comments on Intel Ponte Vecchio GPU to Be Liquid Cooled Inside OAM Form Factor

#1
deu
Thats alot of dies glued together there intel! :D

OT: That is alot of dies in a small PCB area! :0
Posted on Reply
#2
DeathtoGnomes
deuThats alot of dies glued together there intel! :D

OT: That is alot of dies in a small PCB area! :0
You stole my line!
Posted on Reply
#3
The red spirit
600 watts? Holy shit that's a lot. That's almost 3 of my computers fully loaded.
Posted on Reply
#4
ncrs
The red spirit600 watts? Holy shit that's a lot. That's almost 3 of my computers fully loaded.
To be honest I was expecting it to be more. The area of silicon surface to cool is way bigger than the 400W Xeon Platinum 9282, which was sold only in liquid cooled servers by Intel themselves.
Posted on Reply
#5
Jism
The red spirit600 watts? Holy shit that's a lot. That's almost 3 of my computers fully loaded.
Intel obviously taking it to the next level.
Posted on Reply
#6
The red spirit
JismIntel obviously taking it to the next level.
Can't say that, when AMD released 500 watt R9 295X2. Literally two R9 290Xs on one PCB and R9 290Xs were famous for being loud and almost melting.
Posted on Reply
#7
Exyvia
Would of been awesome if they got to the point of In-Chip water Cooling.
Posted on Reply
#8
Dr_b_
deuThats alot of dies glued together there intel! :D

OT: That is alot of dies in a small PCB area! :0
Intel better hope that the glue doesn't melt under load
Posted on Reply
Copyright © 2004-2021 www.techpowerup.com. All rights reserved.
All trademarks used are properties of their respective owners.