Friday, September 24th 2021

KIOXIA CD7 Series PCIe 5.0 SSDs Belt Out 14 GBps Sequential Transfers

Presenting at the China Flash-Market Summit, KIOXIA unveiled its plans to leverage PCI-Express 5.0 to double SSD performance over the current generation. In typical 4-lane U.2 and M.2 connections, PCI-Express Gen 5 enables an interface bandwidth of 16 GB/s per direction (comparable to PCI-Express 3.0 x16). This means that accounting for interface overheads, typical PCIe Gen 5 SSDs will dance around the 11-15 GB/s (sequential) range. KIOXIA unveiled the CD7, a prototype enterprise SSD in the 2.5-inch EDSFF E3S form-factor with U.2 PCI-Express 5.0 x4 interface. This drive, the company claims, offers up to 14 GB/s sequential transfers, more than double the performance of the current CM6 series drives that leverage PCI-Express Gen 4.

KIOXIA said that its first PCI-Express Gen 5 SSDs will begin shipping in Q4-2021, although it didn't mention if this was mass-market, or to select customers. The first enterprise platforms to leverage Gen 5 won't arrive before mid-2022, with Intel's Xeon "Sapphire Rapids" processors that feature PCI-Express Gen 5 support. KIOXIA sounded optimistic about the future growth in performance of SSDs. "Today, Moore's Law is technically dead in both the CPU and DRAM, but it still works at the PCIe clock rate," the company said, adding ""2015 [was] be the third generation of PCIe, 2019 is the fourth generation, and 2022 will be the fifth generation. Even if people spend a lot of money, they can't double CPU nodes to improve system performance, but buying Gen 5 SSD instead of Gen 4 SSD can greatly improve system performance."
Sources: WCCFTech, HotHardware
Add your own comment

7 Comments on KIOXIA CD7 Series PCIe 5.0 SSDs Belt Out 14 GBps Sequential Transfers

#1
ShurikN
Looks impressive. Definitely not intended for the majority of us, but still cool nonetheless.
Posted on Reply
#2
Minus Infinity
14GB/s for a few seconds until the cache is full then drops to 1GB/s or it starts throttling. Given us the random performance figures.
Posted on Reply
#3
Chaitanya
Minus Infinity14GB/s for a few seconds until the cache is full then drops to 1GB/s or it starts throttling. Given us the random performance figures.
These SSDs aren't for random consumers like you.
Posted on Reply
#4
las
So, do they get even hotter than current top PCIe 4.0 drives or is it the same :D
Posted on Reply
#5
persondb
Not for consumers. I really doubt that we will get a direct nvme slot with PCIe 5 from CPU before 2023.
And no chance of doing it through chipset.
Posted on Reply
#6
Tomorrow
Minus Infinity14GB/s for a few seconds until the cache is full then drops to 1GB/s or it starts throttling. Given us the random performance figures.
Actually the image in the article has it. Tho it's obtructed by the pedestal. Looks like 1400>2500 random read IOPS (thousands, hence the KIOPS naming) but obstructed random write KIOPS. Looking the the scale and quoted 76% percentage increase it seems 299. So 170>299. Then in mixed 70% read/30% write it seems like 500>750.

However without knowing the exact block size and queue depth used it's impossible to give out exact MB/s numbers for random r/w.
The drive used for baseline is their own CM6: www.servethehome.com/kioxia-cm6-review-pcie-gen4-ssds-for-the-data-center
Posted on Reply
#7
n-ster
lasSo, do they get even hotter than current top PCIe 4.0 drives or is it the same :D
2.5" form factor, essentially a big heatsink, and in the servers they are meant for there's a ton of airflow.
Posted on Reply