Tuesday, September 5th 2017

Intel Skylake-X HCC CPU Delidded by Der8auer, also not Soldered

Overclocking poster-boy Der8auer has seemingly gotten his hands on some early samples of Intel's Skylake-X high core count (HCC)HEDT CPUs. The upcoming 12 to 18-core enthusiast-class CPUs are being launched on the same X299 platform on socket LGA 2066 that Intel has already launched 4 (Kaby Lake-X), 6, 8 and 10-core parts already, and are supposed to bring Intel towards a level playing field - and then some - with competitor AMD's Threadripper CPUs, which boast of up to 16 cores.

From this delidding process with Der8auer's own delidding tool, Delid-Die-Mate-X, seems to result a die that is much larger - as expected - than Intel's 10-core i9-7900X. At the same time, it seems that Intel is still opting, again, for not soldering its enthusiast-targeted CPUs, which would result in better temperatures and, potentially, overclocking potential. The fact that Der8auer managed to delid the i9-7920X and didn't recommend against doing it likely means that there is minimal risk of damaging your CPU while subjecting it to this process. This is something the renowned overclocker did do when he recommended that users shouldn't delid their Ryzen or Threadripper CPUs looking for better temperatures, since the fact that these were soldered would likely result in both catastrophic damage and a much diminished chance of operating temperatures improvement through the application of special purpose thermal compounds. The Facebook post from Der8auer with the delidded 7920X likely serves as an appetizer for an upcoming delid video on YouTube, as has been the overclocker's MO.

Sources: Der8auer's Facebook, via Overclock 3D
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171 Comments on Intel Skylake-X HCC CPU Delidded by Der8auer, also not Soldered

#1
T1beriu
Is this a joke?

We knew Skylake-X it's not soldered for 3 months already. der8auer was just confirming that his deliding tool works for HCC dies as well.

What's with the news recycling happening lately?
Posted on Reply
#2
RejZoR
Come on Intel, you lazy greedy f**kers.
Posted on Reply
#3
Aldain
Not apparently... They are not soldered...

RejZoR said:
Come on Intel, you lazy greedy f**kers.
Get a TR setup
Posted on Reply
#4
RejZoR
If this continues, I most certainly won't go with Intel next time. I just hope AMD's Ryzen will keep up for when I'll have to upgrade my system (which might not be so soon considering what it is now).
Posted on Reply
#5
trparky
But if Intel closed the gap between the die and the IHS the fact that it isn't soldered shouldn't make any difference. In the past it wasn't the fact that Intel chips use TIM (and not solder) that was causing the issue, it was that there was a gap between the die and the IHS.

Why? Think about it. Do we have to solder our heatsinks and/or waterblocks to the IHS to get better heat transfer? Of course not! Don't be silly. We apply TIM to these components just like Intel does but the difference between what Intel did and what we do is we clamp the heatsync and/or waterblock down really tight against the IHS. The TIM really isn't there to be the heat transfer medium, it's really only there to fill in the microscopic imperfections in the metal to facilitate better transfer of heat.

Now if Intel were able to manage to close the gap between the underside of the IHS and the die then the heat transfer would be just as efficient as it is between the IHS and our heatsinks and/or waterblocks.
Posted on Reply
#6
xkm1948
Looks like a smaller PCB riding on the back of a bigger PCB. Weird huh?
Posted on Reply
#7
Aldain
trparky said:
But if Intel closed the gap between the die and the IHS the fact that it isn't soldered shouldn't make any difference. In the past it wasn't the fact that Intel chips use TIM (and not solder) that was causing the issue, it was that there was a gap between the die and the IHS.

Why? Think about it. Do we have to solder our heatsinks and/or waterblocks to the IHS to get better heat transfer? Of course not! Don't be silly. We apply TIM to these components just like Intel does but the difference between what Intel did and what we do is we clamp the heatsync and/or waterblock down really tight against the IHS. The TIM really isn't there to be the heat transfer medium, it's really only there to fill in the microscopic imperfections in the metal to facilitate better transfer of heat.

Now if Intel were able to manage to close the gap between the underside of the IHS and the die then the heat transfer would be just as efficient as it is between the IHS and our heatsinks and/or waterblocks.
Wishful thinking , if they did accomplish that then the 7900x would not have been a furnace tat it is now
Posted on Reply
#8
xkm1948
RejZoR said:
If this continues, I most certainly won't go with Intel next time. I just hope AMD's Ryzen will keep up for when I'll have to upgrade my system (which might not be so soon considering what it is now).
TR 1950X would look great with your 1080Ti
Posted on Reply
#9
cadaveca
My name is Dave
Aldain said:
Wishful thinking , if they did accomplish that then the 7900x would not have been a furnace tat it is now
Mine's not a furnace at all. And guess what, my VRMs don't overheat, either! It's so shocking that I... I have to laugh at those that complain. Like, I'm sorry, but... your comment is great comedy to me.

My personal 7900X CPU loads @ 4.5 GHz on all cores @ 1.235V, at... 70-80c? Like, it's 10 cores, and a huge whack of cache, pulling well close to 300W... 275, actually. All managed quite well by a 280mm rad.
trparky said:
But if Intel closed the gap between the die and the IHS the fact that it isn't soldered shouldn't make any difference. In the past it wasn't the fact that Intel chips use TIM (and not solder) that was causing the issue, it was that there was a gap between the die and the IHS.
Yeah, I am not sure that tidbit made the news rounds, so many did not see those results, and also, I have a feeling not many people that complain about X299 CPUs being hot actually have one, since you often end up pushing 300W through that TIM in order to be able to make it overheat. If the TIM was so bad, it would not be able to handle that 300W, but with an adequate AIO, it does, and quite well, I might add.
Posted on Reply
#10
Aldain
cadaveca said:
Mine's not a furnace at all. And guess what, my VRMs don't overheat, either! It's so shocking that I... I have to laugh at those that complain. Like, I'm sorry, but... your comment is great comedy to me.

My personal 7900X CPU loads @ 4.5 GHz on all cores @ 1.235V, at... 70-80c? Like, it's 10 cores, and a huge whack of cache, pulling well close to 300W... 275, actually. All managed quite well by a 280mm rad.


Yeah, I am not sure that tidbit made the news rounds, so many did not see those results, and also, I have a feeling not many people that complain about X299 CPUs being hot actually have one, since you often end up pushing 300W through that TIM in order to be able to make it overheat. If the TIM was so bad, it would not be able to handle that 300W, but with an adequate AIO, it does, and quite well, I might add.
LOL

The only person I ever saw that actually defends the 7900x... Some people are just innately comical.. and not in a good way
Posted on Reply
#11
RejZoR
xkm1948 said:
TR 1950X would look great with your 1080Ti
The OC'ed 5820K works just fine.
Posted on Reply
#12
cadaveca
My name is Dave
Aldain said:
LOL

The only person I ever saw that actually defends the 7900x... Some people are just innately comical.. and not in a good way
I'm using one daily, not many others are, so yeah, I'm the odd man out. I even went and bought one, even after Intel sent me every CPU for the platform in ES form... because I got to see the real results for myself, and I don't buy into hype given by extreme OC guys.

Like for der8auer's uses, benching sub-zero, yeah, maybe not the most optimal, but that's not how I use my chips, so I could care less about that aspect of it. It's about reading the information within the proper context. ;)
Posted on Reply
#13
repman244
cadaveca said:
Mine's not a furnace at all. And guess what, my VRMs don't overheat, either! It's so shocking that I... I have to laugh at those that complain. Like, I'm sorry, but... your comment is great comedy to me.

My personal 7900X CPU loads @ 4.5 GHz on all cores @ 1.235V, at... 70-80c? Like, it's 10 cores, and a huge whack of cache, pulling well close to 300W... 275, actually. All managed quite well by a 280mm rad.


Yeah, I am not sure that tidbit made the news rounds, so many did not see those results, and also, I have a feeling not many people that complain about X299 CPUs being hot actually have one, since you often end up pushing 300W through that TIM in order to be able to make it overheat. If the TIM was so bad, it would not be able to handle that 300W, but with an adequate AIO, it does, and quite well, I might add.
But maybe it would run even cooler if it was soldered? Just guessing here of course.
Posted on Reply
#14
VSG
T1beriu said:
Is this a joke?

We knew Skylake-X it's not soldered for 3 months already. der8auer was just confirming that his deliding tool works for HCC dies as well.

What's with the news recycling happening lately?
This is for the high core count SKUs, we knew about the 4-10 core count SKUs before. I updated the title and body to reflect this.
Posted on Reply
#15
cadaveca
My name is Dave
repman244 said:
But maybe it would run even cooler if it was soldered? Just guessing here of course.
Hard to say when you're pushing so much power through it. Like, sure, probably so, but not enough for it to matter for 24/7 use under normal circumstances. I mean, most boards can't even push 400W, because of single 8-pin, and sure, maybe you can push that much power through these chips after de-lid, but I don't exactly think pushing approximately 3x the default power consumption is that good of an idea... for 24/7 use. Benching, yeppers, no problem.


See, I see Intel CPUs with paste TIM and high overhead and think "wow, they made good chips", and then I see AMD's soldered chips and think "hey, they NEED that solder, because these chips have no overhead", and that's good enough for me.
Posted on Reply
#16
Cool Vibrations
repman244 said:
But maybe it would run even cooler if it was soldered? Just guessing here of course.
Don't worry it's "not a furnace" so it's okay...

80c lmao what a joke
Posted on Reply
#17
Tomgang
So intel is on the way with there own ripper cpu and with ripper i mean walletripper :kookoo:
And it isent even soldered to those prices.

Oh well dosent matter to me, i am staying on my trusty x58 pc. So amd as well as intel can suck it :p

I al ready got all i need.
Posted on Reply
#18
Vya Domus
I cannot understand why some people insist on defending Intel's choice to use TIM , a choice that does no good no matter how you spin it around.

Anyway I am really curious to see how something like a 7980XE would be able to maintain clocks considering it is a massive die and it still uses TIM.
Posted on Reply
#19
repman244
Cool Vibrations said:
Don't worry it's "not a furnace" so it's okay...

80c lmao what a joke
I don't own any of the new chips myself but I can tell you this: Temperature != heat.
Posted on Reply
#20
Vya Domus
repman244 said:
Temperature != heat.
True , however taking into consideration how massive these dies are it doesn't take a genius to figure out that these things dissipate as much heat as a high end GPU and that 80c temperature figure does give some insight to that.
Posted on Reply
#21
phanbuey
cadaveca said:
Mine's not a furnace at all. And guess what, my VRMs don't overheat, either! It's so shocking that I... I have to laugh at those that complain. Like, I'm sorry, but... your comment is great comedy to me.

My personal 7900X CPU loads @ 4.5 GHz on all cores @ 1.235V, at... 70-80c? Like, it's 10 cores, and a huge whack of cache, pulling well close to 300W... 275, actually. All managed quite well by a 280mm rad.


Yeah, I am not sure that tidbit made the news rounds, so many did not see those results, and also, I have a feeling not many people that complain about X299 CPUs being hot actually have one, since you often end up pushing 300W through that TIM in order to be able to make it overheat. If the TIM was so bad, it would not be able to handle that 300W, but with an adequate AIO, it does, and quite well, I might add.
So I agree with that... buuut there is like a 20C drop when you replace the tim with liquid metal, so there is something to be said for the solder.

Also the CPUs do eventually throttle at stock under avx load... or at least mine does.

Even with a -3 offset within a few minutes of priming the clock starts to dip. Mine is sitting on a AIO at 1.16v @ 4.6 Ghz and while it's fine, i could definitely push higher with a delid.
Posted on Reply
#22
Basard
What is this blasphemy?!? It looks glued together!!
Posted on Reply
#23
phanbuey
Basard said:
What is this blasphemy?!? It looks glued together!!
"uh sir? so you know those Skylake X's that we ordered from the fab... did we want those on 1151 or 2066?"

"2066... what kind of an idiot question is that... why would you even ask me that?"

"uhmmm... so we just got the shipment in, and uh, we might have a problem..."

"oh my god... those clowns... quick get the converter PCBs and just glue it on there."
Posted on Reply
#24
cdawall
where the hell are my stars
RejZoR said:
If this continues, I most certainly won't go with Intel next time. I just hope AMD's Ryzen will keep up for when I'll have to upgrade my system (which might not be so soon considering what it is now).
Oh good god are we about to start the vega nonsense all over again?
Posted on Reply
#25
NicklasAPJ
well is fine.

even the 7980 XE can do 4,5Ghz on water.

cant wait to buy it :)
Posted on Reply
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