Thursday, November 7th 2019

AMD Announces Ryzen 9 3950X, Details 3rd Gen Ryzen Threadripper, unlocked Athlon 3000G

AMD today announced four new desktop processors across three very diverse markets. To begin with, the company crowned its socket AM4 mainstream desktop platform with the mighty new Ryzen 9 3950X processor. Next up, it released its new baseline entry-level APU, the Athlon 3000G. Lastly, it detailed the 3rd generation Ryzen Threadripper HEDT processor family with two initial models, the Ryzen Threadripper 3960X and the flagship Ryzen Threadripper 3970X. The company also formally released its AGESA Combo PI 1.0.0.4B microcode, and with it, introduced a killer new feature for all "Zen 2" based Ryzen processors, called ECO Mode.

The Ryzen 9 3950X is a 16-core/32-thread processor in the AM4 package, compatible with all socket AM4 motherboards, provided they have the latest BIOS update with AGESA Combo PI 1.0.0.4B microcode. The processor comes with clock-speeds of 3.50 GHz base, with 4.70 GHz maximum boost frequency, and the same 105 W TDP as the 12-core Ryzen 9 3900X. With 512 KB of dedicated L2 cache per core, and 64 MB of shared L3 cache, the chip has a mammoth 72 MB of "total cache."
According to performance numbers put out by AMD, the Ryzen 9 3950X offers up to 22 percent higher single-threaded performance than the Ryzen 7 2700X as tested in Cinebench R20, and a whopping 79 percent higher multi-threaded performance than the Core i9-9900K. The company also claims gaming performance parity with the i9-9900K. The company also claims huge performance-per-Watt gains over the i9-9900K. Available for purchase from November 25, 2019, the Ryzen 9 3950X is priced at USD $749 (MSRP). The retail PIB box package lacks a cooling solution, and AMD recommends at least a 240 mm x 140 mm AIO liquid CPU cooler to go with this chip.
AMD also sealed the bottom end of its socket AM4 processor lineup with the new Athlon 3000G, which adds a few segment-first features. The 3000G is based on the 12 nm "Picasso" silicon that combines CPU cores based on the "Zen+" microarchitecture with an iGPU based on the "Vega" graphics architecture. The 3000G is configured with a 2-core/4-thread CPU and the Radeon Vega 3 onboard graphics that has 3 "Vega" NGCUs. The CPU is clocked at 3.50 GHz, which is a 300 MHz gain over the Athlon 200GE. This time around, AMD has also provided an unlocked base-clock multiplier for the CPU, letting you overclock it. The Radeon Vega 3 iGPU is configured with 192 stream processors, and 1100 MHz engine clock, a 100 MHz gain over that of the 200GE. Available for purchase from November 19, 2019, the Athlon 3000G is priced at just USD $49, and could make for an entertaining little toy for enthusiasts, as well as a formidable chip for home-theater, NAS, or other low-power desktop builds.
Moving on to the most exciting part of the day's announcements, AMD unveiled its 3rd generation Ryzen Threadripper high-end desktop (HEDT) processor series, debuting with two models, the Threadripper 3960X and the Threadripper 3970X. The two are based on the new sTRX4 CPU socket, and are being launched alongside the new AMD TRX40 chipset. The socket itself looks physically similar to the older TR4 socket, and offers cooler compatibility, meaning that any CPU cooler or water-block that's compatible with TR4 will be compatible with sTRX4 as well. Your only consideration should be the cooler's thermal load capacity, as both the processors being announced today have a TDP rating of 280 W. The 3rd gen Ryzen processors themselves have no backwards-compatibility with older AMD X399 chipset motherboards, nor would older Threadrippers work on TRX40 chipset motherboards.
As for the processors themselves, the Ryzen Threadripper 3960X is a 24-core/48-thread beast priced at USD $1,399 (same exact price as the previous generation 24-core Threadripper 2970WX). The 3960X offers frequencies of 3.80 GHz base with up 4.50 GHz maximum boost, and a gargantuan 140 MB total cache (L2+L3). The Threadripper 3970X, on the other hand, is a 32-core/64-thread monstrosity priced at USD $1,999. Despite its extreme core-count, it doesn't skimp on clock-speeds, offering 3.70 GHz nominal clocks, and 4.50 GHz maximum boost frequency. Both chips will be available to purchase on November 25, 2019.

Interestingly, AMD has launched no HEDT chips priced under $1000 this time around, which is where Intel retreated its 10th generation Core X lineup to. AMD says that its 2nd generation Ryzen Threadripper chips are still competitive with Intel's HEDT chips, and suggested that consumers to pick up those chips instead. We interpret this as AMD preparing a round of price-cuts to 2nd gen Threadrippers already in the market, and possibly getting its motherboard partners to do the same with their X399 motherboards.

The 3rd generation Ryzen Threadripper is a derivative of the company's "Rome" multi-chip module, featuring five chips - four 7 nm "Zen 2" 8-core CPU chiplets (or CCDs), and one 14 nm I/O Controller die (or ICOD). The four CCDs talk to the ICOD over the Infinity Fabric interconnect, which has doubled in bandwidth over the previous generation. The ICOD on the sTRX4 Threadrippers are configured with a monolithic quad-channel DDR4 memory interface that supports up to 2 TB of memory, including ECC support.
The PCI-Express root-complex of the 3rd generation Ryzen Threadripper is massive, and fascinating. It puts out a total of 64 PCI-Express gen 4.0 lanes, wired out as follows:
  • 48 lanes toward PCI-Express x16 slots (x16/x16/x16), which can be further segmented two x8 slots, each
  • 8 lanes toward chipset-bus. That's right, AMD is using an extra-wide PCI-Express 4.0 x8 pipe between the CPU and the TRX40 chipset
  • 8 general purpose lanes, either configured as two M.2 NVMe slots with x4 wiring, each, or as x4 motherboard slots, or even additional SATA ports
As described in the list above, the move to bolster chipset-bus with PCI-Express 4.0 x8, quadrupling bandwidth over the previous generation TR4 platform (which uses PCI-Express 3.0 x4), is probably one of the reasons AMD had to come up with a new CPU socket.

The AMD TRX40 chipset is physically similar to the X570 and is designed in-house by AMD for GlobalFoundries 12 nm FinFET node. Its PCI-Express gen 4.0 switch is configured differently to accommodate the wider x8 chipset-bus. The TRX40's PCIe budget is laid out as follows.
  • 8 lanes toward chipset-bus (this can't be changed)
  • 8 general purpose lanes (for external onboard devices such as GbE or WLAN controllers, additional USB controllers, etc., or even wired out as slots)
  • Bloc of 4 lanes configurable as four SATA 6 Gbps ports, general purpose lanes for slots, or an M.2/U.2 NVMe connection with x4 wiring
  • A second such bloc of 4 lanes
For a motherboard that has at least four SATA 6 Gbps ports, the TRX40 chipset hence effectively puts out 12 downstream PCIe gen 4.0 lanes.
Lastly, AMD announced a fascinating new platform feature called ECO Mode. Applicable to all socket AM4 processors that have "Zen 2" CPU cores (Ryzen 5 3500 and above), ECO Mode is essentially a cTDP (configurable TDP) implementation for the desktop platform. You flick a toggle in Ryzen Master, and the processor's TDP is capped at 65 Watts on-the-fly. So when not gaming or doing serious work, you can turn on ECO Mode and ensure your processor never draws more than 65 Watts. For the mighty Ryzen 9 3950X, ECO Mode offers 77 percent performance, but 44 percent lower power-draw, and 7°C lower temperatures.

The entire slide-deck follows.
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114 Comments on AMD Announces Ryzen 9 3950X, Details 3rd Gen Ryzen Threadripper, unlocked Athlon 3000G

#101
candle_86
gmn 17
GPU = Gaming Processor Unit
No Graphics processing unit.
Posted on Reply
#104
Camm
$1500 i would have bought a 3970x, but 2000 is a deal breaker for me. Umming and aaring about the CCC penalty on the 3960x or just dropping down to a 3950x. Honestly, a 3950x for the tr platform would be pretty ideal though.
Posted on Reply
#105
bug
champsilva
Maybe $3200?
Camm
$1500 i would have bought a 3970x, but 2000 is a deal breaker for me. Umming and aaring about the CCC penalty on the 3960x or just dropping down to a 3950x. Honestly, a 3950x for the tr platform would be pretty ideal though.
I'd argue if you really need a Threadripper, you'll be making back the asking $$$ within a month or two. Otherwise, you're just using it wrong ;)
Posted on Reply
#106
Camm
bug
I'd argue if you really need a Threadripper, you'll be making back the asking $$$ within a month or two. Otherwise, you're just using it wrong ;)
Home lab, mostly running SCCM. I can use the cores, but tax can only offset so much, and it still needs to pull double duties as my daily driver.
Posted on Reply
#107
bug
Camm
Home lab, mostly running SCCM. I can use the cores, but tax can only offset so much, and it still needs to pull double duties as my daily driver.
"I can use the cores" != "I need the cores"
Everybody's commute would take a little less if we each had a Ferrari. That doesn't need we all need a Ferrari ;)
Posted on Reply
#108
Camm
bug
"I can use the cores" != "I need the cores"
Everybody's commute would take a little less if we each had a Ferrari. That doesn't need we all need a Ferrari ;)
If everyone could afford a Ferrari and speed limits were unlimited, people would use the Ferrarri and take the time benefit from it.

But your core analogy is a bit false, more aptly, time=money, and the time I could save with being able to dedicated more cores into my home lab isn't equivalent to the cost of the part.
Posted on Reply
#109
pantherx12
Pretty surprised at people complaining about price of high end parts.

It's literally cutting edge tech, those thread ripper CPUs take stock out the server side which is more profitable, they are not a high volume sale. Hence high prices.

AMD has made sure the mainstream parts are affordable and competitive. The ultra high end of the market has always been crazy.

That's why back when I used to be a regular here I'd buy midrange parts and overclock the hell out of them. The only top end models I've owned are hd4890 because I bought it on here and a 4790k because it was in a laptop and that was awesome.
Posted on Reply
#110
bug
pantherx12
Pretty surprised at people complaining about price of high end parts.

It's literally cutting edge tech, those thread ripper CPUs take stock out the server side which is more profitable, they are not a high volume sale. Hence high prices.

AMD has made sure the mainstream parts are affordable and competitive. The ultra high end of the market has always been crazy.

That's why back when I used to be a regular here I'd buy midrange parts and overclock the hell out of them. The only top end models I've owned are hd4890 because I bought it on here and a 4790k because it was in a laptop and that was awesome.
Yes, no matter whether we're talking CPUs, GPUs, displays or something else, there is always the mandatory share of posts complaining about "rip-off" because price doesn't scale linearly with performance. Nothing anyone can do about it.
Posted on Reply
#111
champsilva
bug
I'd argue if you really need a Threadripper, you'll be making back the asking $$$ within a month or two. Otherwise, you're just using it wrong ;)
Actually if you're rly doin money you buy epyc/xeon ;)

Specially for longevity. 256/512GB RAM, dual socket and so on.
Posted on Reply
#112
kapone32
Though I would love to have one of these (if for no other reason that because I can) the cost of the combination of board and CPU will be most likely $2000-$3000 Canadian. If you are already on TR4 it can be difficult to think of buying a new board vs the $300-$500 you already spent on X399. The major benefits of TR40 are just like X570. WIFI 6 and PCI-E 4.0. The funny thing is WIFI 6 can be had for $50 Canadian and you could get an expansion (some X399 already came with one) card to get faster than PCI_E 4.0 speeds on RAID 0.
Posted on Reply
#113
rickderick7
I bought AMD Ryzen 9 3950X last week, and set it up on my CPU , but since then my printer stopped working. Is that something related to this device? I even tried setting up the printer again with the below steps in the link, but still no luck. I need my printer working as before.
<a href=" https://123hp-com-setup.us/123hp-oj5255-wireless-setup/">123.hp.com/oj5255</a>
Could someone advice on this?
Thanks
Rick
Posted on Reply
#114
bug
rickderick7
I bought AMD Ryzen 9 3950X last week, and set it up on my CPU , but since then my printer stopped working. Is that something related to this device? I even tried setting up the printer again with the below steps in the link, but still no luck. I need my printer working as before.
<a href=" https://123hp-com-setup.us/123hp-oj5255-wireless-setup/">123.hp.com/oj5255</a>
Could someone advice on this?
Thanks
Rick
You really should start a new thread in the proper forums, you're more likely to get help that way.
But no, changing the CPU will not cause the printer to stop working. If you decide to start a new thread, add details like: did you change the motherboard as well, does the new motherboard support wifi, did you (re)install the wifi drivers...

And welcome to TPU, but as a hint, refrain from including links in your posts until you get like a hundred posts or so under your belt. I know you meant well, but newcomers posting links are frowned upon (thank spammers for that).
Posted on Reply
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