Thursday, March 18th 2021

HPE Lists 40-Core Intel Ice Lake-SP Xeon Server Processor

Hewlett Packard Enterprise, the company focused on making enterprise hardware and software, has today mistakenly listed some of Intel's upcoming 3rd generation Xeon Scalable processors. Called Ice Lake-SP, the latest server processor generation is expected to launch sometime in the coming days, with a possible launch date being the March 23rd "Intel Unleashed" webcast. The next generation of processors will finally bring a new vector of technologies Intel needs in server space. That means the support for PCIe 4.0 protocol for higher speed I/O and octa-channel DDR4 memory controller for much greater bandwidth. The CPU lineup will for the first time use Intel's advanced 10 nm node called 10 nm SuperFin.

Today, in the leaked HPE listing, we get to see some of the Xeon models Intel plans to launch. Starting from 32-core models, all the way to 40-core models, all SKUs above 28 cores are supposed to use dual die configuration to achieve high core counts. The limit of a single die is 28 cores. HPE listed a few models, with the highest-end one being the Intel Xeon Platinum XCC 8380 processor. It features 40 cores with 80 threads and a running frequency of 2.3 GHz. If you are wondering about TDP, it looks like the 10 nm SuperFin process is giving good results, as the CPU is rated only for 270 Watts of power.
Sources: HPE, via @9550pro (Twitter)
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13 Comments on HPE Lists 40-Core Intel Ice Lake-SP Xeon Server Processor

#1
phanbuey
sweet! Hopefully means Alder lake is on track if the 10nm process is able to put out Xeons...
Posted on Reply
#3
Durhamranger
DeathtoGnomes40-core does not equal 64 core.
No it doesn`t but its a step in the right direction
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#4
defaultluser
So wait, the first generation ice lake server is going to have the exact same number of cores per-socket as Skyake?

Sounds even more pointless!

Also, those yields must be absolute shit if you have to disable 16 off of every 2-die pair (top part = only 40)
Posted on Reply
#5
Wirko
defaultluserSo wait, the first generation ice lake server is going to have the exact same number of cores per-socket as Skyake?

Sounds even more pointless!

Also, those yields must be absolute shit if you have to disable 16 off of every 2-die pair (top part = only 40)
Or did Amazon pay in advance for the first 100,000 56-core parts?
Posted on Reply
#6
defaultluser
WirkoOr did Amazon pay in advance for the first 100,000 56-core parts?
You're assuming those exist at-all?

Zen 2 was a lot smarter design, with 8-core slices. Even on a new process node, they were able to give wide availability of 64-cvore servers. They were also able to resolve their consumer parts fairly quickly to offer a full lineup of 16-core 3950x chips before the official 3900x's launch-day.

www.windowscentral.com/amd-announces-mind-blowing-16-core-ryzen-e3-2019

Impressively short delay, considering how much demand EPYC was already stealing form those 8-core chiplrets.
Posted on Reply
#7
iO
defaultluserSo wait, the first generation ice lake server is going to have the exact same number of cores per-socket as Skyake?

Sounds even more pointless!

Also, those yields must be absolute shit if you have to disable 16 off of every 2-die pair (top part = only 40)
Hmm, but 8000 series are monolithic not the glued up dual-die 9200 series.
I'd say it's the opposite: their yields improved enough that they are able to offer the full 40 cores per die instead of the cut down 36 or 38 core variants..
Posted on Reply
#8
Tom Yum
iOHmm, but 8000 series are monolithic not the glued up dual-die 9200 series.
I'd say it's the opposite: their yields improved enough that they are able to offer the full 40 cores per die instead of the cut down 36 or 38 core variants..
Ice-Lake SP dies are still only 28 cores, 40 core models are using two dies as a MCM, with 16 cores deactivated. This is another case of Intel having to open up features from previously higher end parts (ie having 2 die server processors in their 8000 series server line, previously exclusive to the 9200 series) to compete with AMD.
Posted on Reply
#11
Wirko
Caring1Read the title of the thread.
I also looked three inches below the title where it says, "The limit of a single die is 28 cores". As we can see in Intel's newest wafer photo, it's 40 rather than 28.
Posted on Reply
#12
Caring1
WirkoI also looked three inches below the title where it says, "The limit of a single die is 28 cores". As we can see in Intel's newest wafer photo, it's 40 rather than 28.
"all the way to 40-core models"
Posted on Reply
#13
Wirko
Caring1"all the way to 40-core models"
Yes. That could be two dies with 28 cores each, many of them bad or disabled. Now that a 40-core die has been (almost) confirmed, there's less room for speculation about two-die Xeons.
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