Tuesday, May 25th 2021

GIGABYTE Unleashes the AORUS Gen 4 7000s Prem. SSD

GIGABYTE Technology, one of the top global manufacturers of motherboards, graphics cards, and hardware solutions, announces today the latest AORUS Gen4 7000s Prem. SSD with up to 7 GB/s read speed while optimizing passive thermal dissipation, which promises no throttling under long-lasting operation. Through the SSD Tool Box application, users can have an instant control on overall operation of SSD.

AORUS Gen4 7000s Prem. SSD adopts the PCIe 4.0 NVMe M.2 interface and it equips the latest Phison E18 selected 8-channel controller, which provides users with ultimate random access rate, as well as the high speed 3D-TLC NAND Flash and SLC cache design that brings the PCIe 4.0 into full play. With the read speed up to 7 GB/s and write speed up to 6.85 GB/s, AORUS Gen4 7000s Prem. SSD can power up content creators, gamers, and users eager for extreme performance.
The AORUS Gen4 7000s Prem. SSD is the best solution for the extreme users who prefer an advanced thermal design. M.2 Thermal Guard XTREME with Nanocabon coating, the high conductivity pad design, the optimization on the height and dissipation area, as well as the enhanced double heat-pipes are some of the changes that promise the consistent cooling and high performance even at situations with minimum airflow. Under the real test, AORUS Gen4 7000s Prem. SSD can maintain extreme read speed of 7 GB/s for long lasting operation.

"High-speed SSDs generate heat on full speed operation, and normally thermal throttling is implemented as a safety feature to prevent data loss, or wear-out the memory chips and controllers. The throttling state engages to maintain the stability and durability, however it slows down the performance and it reduces the transfer rate." said Jackson Hsu, Director of the GIGABYTE Channel Solutions Product Development Division. "AORUS Gen4 7000s Prem. SSD uses ultra-durable design and high quality materials for high-speed performance. Moreover, it optimizes the premium thermal standards set by our previous 7000s SSD products to provide users with an outstanding performance. Even without air flow, the thermal solution is capable of preventing the thermal throttling that might occur at high-speed operation of SSD, thus boost the system performance."

AORUS Gen4 7000s Prem. SSD is already in the market and it supports all the motherboards with 2280 NVMe M.2 interface design. To release the breakthrough performance of read speed up to 7 GB/s, AMD X570 / B550 motherboards or Intel Z590 / B560 / Z490 / H470 motherboards with next-gen Intel Core processors supported are highly-recommended. With GIGABYTE R&D's professional adjustment, comprehensive verification, software enhancement, and the 5 years warranty service, GIGABYTE motherboards offers more stability with higher performance, which is definitely the best choice for users. For more information, please visit GIGABYTE's official website: https://www.gigabyte.com/Solid-State-Drive/AORUS-Gen4-7000s-Prem-SSD-2TB#kf
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8 Comments on GIGABYTE Unleashes the AORUS Gen 4 7000s Prem. SSD

#1
Vya Domus
A tad exaggerated plus the real problem with these is lack of airflow not that the heatsink isn't big enough.
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#2
kiddagoat
Sorta reminds me of the OCZ Reaper RAM.
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#3
Caring1
If you are going to make it that big, it's probably more beneficial to use active cooling.
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#4
TechLurker
Personally, there was an opportunity for mobo makers for AMD to take their chipset fans and upgrade the flow paths to also include the NVMe drives too, esp. on the high-end boards with full board covers. IIRC, only 1 or 2 high-end boards actually used the chipset fan to blow some air over the 2nd NVMe, but the 1st and the occasional 3rd NVMe were too far. Then expand it to the intel side too. Asus could use their fancy ultra-thin laptop centrifugal fan for this purpose.

Or go back to the old-school heatsink cities around the chipset area, including removable heatpipes that can be installed over an NVMe drives and routed to the heatsink tower. Not perfect, but it would route the heatsink towers away from most of the PCIe slot area, and could still leave the topmost slot for big GPUs.
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#5
Jism
TechLurkerPersonally, there was an opportunity for mobo makers for AMD to take their chipset fans and upgrade the flow paths to also include the NVMe drives too, esp. on the high-end boards with full board covers. IIRC, only 1 or 2 high-end boards actually used the chipset fan to blow some air over the 2nd NVMe, but the 1st and the occasional 3rd NVMe were too far. Then expand it to the intel side too. Asus could use their fancy ultra-thin laptop centrifugal fan for this purpose.

Or go back to the old-school heatsink cities around the chipset area, including removable heatpipes that can be installed over an NVMe drives and routed to the heatsink tower. Not perfect, but it would route the heatsink towers away from most of the PCIe slot area, and could still leave the topmost slot for big GPUs.
I think my previous asus board did cover 2 NVME SSD's under the heatsink of the board itself. It was part of the chipset cooling and even VRM cooling. The third slot was outside of that tho.

But if you use regular NVME SSD's with a proper heatsink, things should be OK knowing if there's sufficient airflow going through your case.

I never reach 60 degrees really, and see zero degradation in performance. Performance is usually a momentum; once that cache fills up the SSD lowers down to it's real speeds.
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#6
MentalAcetylide
Just what we need, more space-hungry overweight radiators inside of our cases. Next thing you know, we'll be needing water cooling for our keyboards and headsets. :laugh:
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#8
MentalAcetylide
TardianSize does matter?
Up to a point. What matters more is surface area. The greater the surface area, the more heat that can be dissipated. I would opt for something that is smaller with many hair-thin fibers coming off of the surface opposite to that of the contact side of the plate. Only problem with that is it would require a very ductile material to mold similar to gold & would most likely be easily damaged just from handling it improperly.
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