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TechPowerUp GPU-Z v0.8.0 Released

TechPowerUp rolled out the latest version of GPU-Z, the popular graphics subsystem information, diagnostic, and monitoring app, which no enthusiast can leave home without. Version 0.8.0 introduces support for a large number of new GPUs, and fixes several bugs. To begin with, GPU-Z 0.8.0 adds full support for GeForce GTX 980 and GTX 970, including a reliable method of extracting BIOS from GeForce "Maxwell" GPUs. Support is also added for Quadro K420, K620, K2000D, K2200, K4200, K5200; and Radeon R5 M240, R5 M255, FirePro W2100, W4100, W8100, FireStream 9270, FirePro 2450. Preliminary support is added for AMD "Topaz" GPU.

GPU-Z 0.8.0 now accurately measures dedicated and dynamic memory usage on Windows 8 and 8.1 systems. A system hang is fixed on systems with AMD "Hawaii" GPUs, when GPU-Z is running alongside an accelerated video playback. GPU-Z now correctly reads the ROP and stream processor counts of AMD "Tonga" GPU, with updated die-size info. Stuttering on systems with CrossFire ULPS is fixed. The change-log details other relevant changes.
DOWNLOAD: TechPowerUp GPU-Z 0.8.0 | GPU-Z 0.8.0 ASUS ROG Themed

The change-log follows.

AMD Reports 2014 Third Quarter Results

AMD today announced revenue for the third quarter of 2014 of $1.43 billion, operating income of $63 million and net income of $17 million, or $0.02 per share. Non-GAAP operating income was $66 million and non-GAAP net income was $20 million, or $0.03 per share.

"AMD's third quarter financial performance reflects progess in diversifying our business," said Dr. Lisa Su, AMD president and CEO. "Our Enterprise, Embedded and Semi-Custom segment results were strong; however, performance in our Computing and Graphics segment was mixed based on challenging market conditions that require us to take further steps to evolve and strengthen the financial performance of this business. Our top priority is to deliver leadership technologies and products as we continue to transform AMD."

8K A Great Challenge: NVIDIA and AMD

Even as 4K Ultra HD (3840 x 2160) is beginning to enter the consumer mainstream, with 28-inch displays being priced around $600, and Apple toying with 5K (5120 x 2880), with its next-generation iMac Retina desktops, Japanese display maker Sharp threw a spanner in the works, by unveiling a working prototype of its 8K (7680 x 4320 pixels) display, at the CETAC trade-show, held in Japan.

Two of the industry's biggest graphics processor makers, NVIDIA and AMD, reacted similarly to the development, calling 8K "a great challenge." Currently, neither company has a GPU that can handle the resolution. 8K is four times as many pixels as 4K. Driving an Ultra HD display over DVI needs two TMDS links, and DisplayPort 1.2 and HDMI 2.0 have just enough bandwidth to drive Ultra HD at 60 Hz. To drive 8K, both NVIDIA and AMD believe you would need more than one current-generation GPU, the display should connect to both cards over independent connectors, and somehow treat the single display as four Ultra HD displays. We imagine Sharp demoed its display at a very low refresh rate, to compensate for the bandwidth limitation. After 10 years of Full-HD tyranny, display resolutions are finally beginning to see their normal rate of development. It's time now for GPU developers and display interconnects to keep up.


Source: Expreview

AMD Rolls Out Catalyst 14.9.1 Beta Driver

Shortly after the launch of its Catalyst 14.9 WHQL driver, AMD released a follow-up Catalyst 14.9.1 Beta driver, to address some immediate issues found with the driver. It addresses an intermittent black-screen or BSOD issue caused after driver installation of Catalyst 14.9 WHQL, Catalyst Control Center crash, random crash when enabling or disabling 4-way CrossFireX, and Battlefield 4 instability on systems with 4-way CrossFireX. It also fixes a system crash issue found with Sniper Elite III, on systems with 4-way CrossFireX.

DOWNLOAD: AMD Catalyst 14.9.1 beta for Windows 8.1/7/Vista 64-bit | Windows 8.1/7/Vista 32-bit

iBuyPower Intros SBX Entertainment System

There are very few instances where one product category can leap frog over to another and make a profound impact. Today, iBUYPOWER, makes one such leap. Introducing the iBUYPOWER SBX Entertainment System, an ultra-simplified system designed to do one thing: entertain. Melding together the simplicity of a traditional game console, but harnessing power usually available to only high-end desktop PCs, iBUYPOWER is able to usher in both performance and content unheard of in the living room space.

Designed in Los Angeles, iBUYPOWER labored to create a highly tuned and optimized system that would deliver a sustainable 60 frames-per second gaming experience at true high-definition resolutions. Powered by a high-performance AMD multi-core processor paired with the latest Radeon HD graphics technology from AMD, customers will be able to jump a full generation ahead of the latest game consoles.

AMD Appoints Dr. Lisa Su as President and Chief Executive Officer

AMD today announced that its board of directors has appointed Dr. Lisa Su as president and chief executive officer and member of the board of directors, effective immediately. Dr. Su, 44, succeeds Rory Read, 52, who has stepped down as president and chief executive officer, and member of the board of directors, as part of a transition plan. Read will support the transition in an advisory role, remaining with the company through the end of 2014.

"Leadership succession planning has been a joint effort between Rory and the board and we felt that Lisa's expertise and proven leadership in the global semiconductor industry make this an ideal time for her to lead the company," said Bruce Claflin, chairman of AMD's board of directors. "The board looks forward to continuing to work with Lisa and the rest of the senior management team to build on the company's momentum. I would also like to thank Rory for his many accomplishments and contributions positioning AMD for long-term success by helping to create a strong foundation and clear path to re-establish the company's growth and profitability."

AMD Cuts Prices of R9 290 Series and R9 280 Series Even Further

AMD cut prices of its Radeon R9 290 series and R9 280 series graphics cards further down from last month's price-cuts. The cuts see the company's flagship single-GPU product, the Radeon R9 290X, drop from $449, down to $399, an $150 overall drop, from its launch price of $549. The Radeon R9 290, on the other hand, has its price cut to $299, from its launch price of $399. The drop in price of the R9 290 is squeezing AMD's sub-$300 lineup like never before. The R9 280X is down to $270, just $30 less than the R9 290. The R9 285, which launched barely two months ago, has its price squeezed to $229, just $10 more than NVIDIA's GTX 760. If you're in the market for a graphics card with about $250 in hand, you're now open to a ton of options, including ramen for a week, in exchange for the $329 GeForce GTX 970.

Source: Tweaktown

Apple Readying iMac Retina with 5K Display

Apple's next iMac desktop could flaunt the company's "Retina Display" moniker, which stands for pixel density that matches that of your retina. Apple's idea of Retina display on a 20-something inch desktop is 5K, which is 5120 x 2880 pixels, or four times the resolution of WQHD (2560 x 1440), or sixteen times HD (1280 x 720). Early betas of Apple's OSX "Yosemite" feature references to display resolutions upwards of 5K, including 5760 x 3240, and 6400 x 3600.

At 27-inch, 5120 x 2880 would give the Mac a staggering 217 ppi of pixel density, which is not very far from the 263 ppi which 9.7-inch iPads offer, with their 2048 x 1536 resolutions. To put 217 ppi into perspective, a 28-inch Ultra HD display offers 157 ppi, and Apple's current 27-inch iMac with WQHD display offers just 108 ppi. A mainstream 24-inch full HD (1920 x 1080) display offers just 91 ppi. The GPUs that drive these next-gen iMacs are anyone's guess. Both current-generation AMD, and NVIDIA's new GTX 980 cap out at digital resolutions of 4096 x 2160.


Source: 9to5Mac

AMD Demos First Network Function Virtualization on 64-Bit AMD and ARM Technology

AMD today demonstrated the first network function virtualization (NFV) solution on AMD's 64-bit ARM-based SoC and announced that it is now sampling to AMD's embedded customers. The NFV demonstration is powered by a 64-bit ARM-based AMD Embedded R-Series SoC, codenamed "Hierofalcon," supported with technology from two key ecosystem partners -- Aricent for the networking software stack and Mentor Graphics for embedded Linux and tools. NFV is an innovative solution that simplifies deployment and management for network and telecommunications service providers with a fully virtualized communications infrastructure that helps maximize performance, while working to reduce costs.

At ARM TechCon, AMD specifically showcased the capabilities of an ARM-based NFV solution, virtualizing the functionality of a packet data network gateway, serving gateway, and a mobility management entity. In addition to virtualizing hardware components, AMD showcased a live traffic migration between the ARM-based AMD Embedded R-Series SoC and the x86-based second generation AMD R-Series APU. AMD's ARM-based NFV solution will be especially valuable for telecommunications network infrastructure providers interested in a flexible software-defined networking (SDN) implementation to manage networking services with configurable hardware to help reduce complexity and cost. NFV is the abstraction of numerous network devices such as routers and gateways, to enable relocation of network functions from dedicated hardware appliances to generic servers. With NFV, much of the intelligence currently built into proprietary, specialized hardware is accomplished with software running on general purpose hardware. The resulting solution is a fully virtualized communications infrastructure -- including virtual servers, storage and networks -- that simplifies deployment and management for network and telecommunications service providers. AMD is paving the way for both new and established service providers to design and deploy either x86 or ARM-based NFV infrastructure which meets their performance, cost and complexity requirements.

AMD Rolls Out Catalyst 14.9 WHQL Driver Suite

AMD rolled out the Catalyst 14.9 WHQL driver suite, its quarterly release of WHQL-signed drivers for AMD Radeon discrete- and integrated GPUs. The drivers add support for some of the newer Radeon GPUs, such as the R9 285; and introduce a large list of game-specific performance improvements. The drivers also introduce AMD Eyefinity mixed-resolution modes, Eyefinity display alignment, new video-color and display settings in Catalyst Control Center, an updated AMD Mantle API runtime, and JPEG decoding acceleration for certain GPUs.
DOWNLOAD: AMD Catalyst 14.9 WHQL for Windows 8.1/7/Vista 64-bit | AMD Catalyst 14.9 WHQL for Windows 8.1/7/Vista 32-bit

The change-log follows.

First ARM Cortex-A57-Based Hadoop Demonstration Achieved on AMD Opteron A-Series

AMD (NYSE: AMD) today will make the first public demonstration of Apache Hadoop running on an ARM Cortex-A57-based AMD Opteron A-Series processor. In a technical session at the JavaOne conference to be delivered this afternoon by AMD corporate fellow Leendert van Doorn, the company will show how the expanding AMD Opteron A-Series server software ecosystem now includes Hadoop, the Java-based framework for storage and large-scale data processing. In addition, Henrik Stahl, vice president, Java product management and Internet of Things at Oracle, will join van Doorn on stage to discuss Oracle's support for AMD's 64-bit ARM server architecture.

Hadoop, a distributed processing technology used primarily for big data analysis, is a rapidly expanding market expected to reach upward of $50 billion by 2020. The combination of 64-bit ARM-based servers and Hadoop is designed to accelerate the changing economics of large-scale computing by enabling distributed processing across clusters of ARM-based servers. Running on the recently announced AMD Opteron A1100 development platform, the demonstration will feature Apache Hadoop running on the Oracle JDK. Leendert will also show multiple nodes running the same demonstration using Linux environments based on Fedora technology from the Red Hat-sponsored Fedora community and the community supported OpenSUSE Project.

AMD "Tonga" Silicon Features 384-bit Wide Memory Interface

In what could explain the rather large die-size and transistor-count of AMD's "Tonga" silicon, compared to "Tahiti," it turns out that the silicon features a 384-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface, and not the previously thought of 256-bit wide one. The die is placed on a package with pins for just 256-bit, on the Radeon R9 285, but it can be placed on a bigger package, with more pins, to wire out the full width of the memory bus, in future SKUs. This isn't the first time AMD has done something like this. Its "Tahiti LE" chip was essentially a "Tahiti" die placed on a smaller package with pins for just a 256-bit wide memory bus, on the oddball Radeon HD 7870 XT.

What this means is that AMD's next performance-segment graphics card based on the "Tonga" silicon, could feature 50% more memory bandwidth than the R9 285. The stream processor count is still 2,048, but these are more advanced Graphics CoreNext 1.2 stream processors, compared to first-generation ones on "Tahiti," offering more performance per Watt. The TMU count remains 128, although there's no clarity on the ROP count. Estimates are split between 32 and 48. The R9 285 has 32, and so does "Tahiti."
Source: PCWatch

NVIDIA Sacrifices VESA Adaptive Sync Tech to Rake in G-SYNC Royalties

NVIDIA's G-SYNC technology is rivaled by AMD's project Freesync, which is based on a technology standardized by the video electronics standards association (VESA), under Adaptive Sync. The technology lets GPUs and monitors keep display refresh rates in sync with GPU frame-rates, so the resulting output appears fluid. VESA's technology does not require special hardware inside standards-compliant monitors, and is royalty-free, unlike NVIDIA G-SYNC, which is based on specialized hardware, which display makers have to source from NVIDIA, which makes it a sort of a royalty.

When asked by Chinese publication Expreview on whether NVIDIA GPUs will support VESA adaptive-sync, the company mentioned that NVIDIA wants to focus on G-SYNC. A case in point is the display connector loadout of the recently launched GeForce GTX 980 and GTX 970. According to specifications listed on NVIDIA's website, the two feature DisplayPort 1.2 connectors, and not DisplayPort 1.2a, a requirement of VESA's new technology. AMD's year-old Radeon R9 and R7 GPUs, on the other hand, support DisplayPort 1.2a, casting a suspicion on NVIDIA's choice of connectors. Interestingly, the GTX 980 and GTX 970 feature HDMI 2.0, so it's not like NVIDIA is slow at catching up with new standards. Did NVIDIA leave out DisplayPort 1.2a in a deliberate attempt to check Adaptive Sync?


Source: Expreview

Industry's Biggest Scaler Vendors Pledge Support for AMD's Project FreeSync

Today, AMD announced collaborations with scaler vendors MStar, Novatek and Realtek to build scaler units ready with DisplayPort Adaptive-Sync and AMD's Project FreeSync by year end.

"Since the dawn of hardware-accelerated graphics, gamers dreamed of liquid smooth gameplay free of stuttering and tearing," said Matt Skynner, corporate vice president and general manager, Graphics Business Unit, AMD. "AMD's Project FreeSync is aimed at realizing that vision with an open, standardized and license-free approach that will encourage lower prices and wider adoption."

Radeon R9 290X Sees Price Cuts

AMD is apparently working with its add-in board manufacturers and retailers to bring down prices of its flagship single-GPU graphics card, the Radeon R9 290X. The card can now be had for as low as $449, non-reference design, factory-overclocked cards starting at a $50 premium. Prices could settle down somewhere between $450 and $500. This closely follows AMD's move to bring down price of its dual-GPU flagship Radeon R9 295X2 by a whopping 34 percent, down to $999, offering performance competitive to the $2999 GeForce GTX TITAN-Z. NVIDIA is preparing two new graphics cards competitive in performance to the Radeon R9 290 series, the GeForce GTX 970 and GTX 980. The two are based on the company's new 28 nm "GM204" silicon, implementing the "Maxwell" GPU architecture.

AMD Readies Radeon R9 390X to Take on GeForce GTX 980

It turns out that the big OEM design win liquid cooling solutions maker Asetek was bragging about, is the Radeon R9 390X, and the "undisclosed OEM" AMD. Pictures of a cooler shroud is doing rounds on Chinese tech forums, which reveals something that's similar in design to the Radeon R9 295X2, only designed for single-GPU. The shroud has its fan intake pushed to where it normally is for single-GPU cards; with cutouts for the PCIe power connectors, and a central one, through which liquid cooling tubes pass through.

One can also take a peek at the base-plate of the cooler, which will cool the VRM and memory under the fan's air-flow. The cooler design reveals that AMD wants its reference-design cards to sound quieter "at any cost," even if it means liquid cooling solutions that can be messy with multi-card CrossFire setups, and in systems that already use liquid-cooling for the CPU; and leave it to AIB partners to come up with air-cooled cards, with meatier heatsinks. Other specs of the R9 390X are unknown, as is launch date. It could be based on a member of the "Pirate Islands" family of GPUs, of which the new "Tonga" GPU driving the R9 285 is a part of. A possible codename of AMD's big chip from this family is "Fiji."


Source: VideoCardz

AMD Accelerates Speed and Performance for New Adobe Creative Cloud Pro

AMD (NYSE: AMD) today announced that AMD A-Series APUs, AMD Radeon graphics and AMD FirePro professional graphics deliver superior performance to unlock the full potential of the latest features and capabilities announced by Adobe for its flagship Adobe Creative Cloud professional video tools and workflows. New high performance AMD-powered OpenCL debayering for Phantom Cine and Canon RAW camera formats joins previously unannounced debayering of RedR3D, CinemaDNG, and Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera JPEG formats, unlocking real-time editing, effects and color grading for massive production productivity and lightning fast rendering to deliver projects on time and at high quality.

"Speed and performance are essential ingredients that ensure video producers are productive every day and successfully compete for business, engagement and client satisfaction," said Steve Belt, corporate vice president, Strategic Alliances and Platform Enablement, AMD. "Pros know that they can rely on the combination of OpenCL support in Adobe Creative Cloud and the associated AMD hardware acceleration to deliver a steady stream of advanced tools that set them apart creatively and productively."

First Intel Core M "Broadwell" Benchmarks Surface

Here are some of the first benchmarks of Intel's ambitious Core M processor, a performance-segment dual-core processor with a thermal envelope of just 4.5W, making it ideal for tablets, ultra-portables, and mainstream desktops. At IDF 2014, Intel showed off a 12.5-inch tablet running a Core M 5Y70 chip. An MCM of the CPU and PCH dies, the CPU die features two "Broadwell" 64-bit x86 cores, a large new graphics processor with 24 execution units and 192 stream engines, 4 MB of shared L3 cache, a dual-channel LPDDR3 memory controller, and a PCI-Express 3.0 root complex. The PCH die wires out the platform's various connectivity options.

The 12.5-inch Core M tablet was put through three tests, Cinebench R11.5, SunSpider 1.0.2, and 3DMark Ice Storm Unlimited. With the multi-threaded CPU-intensive Cinebench R11.5, the Core M scores a respectable 17 FPS in the GL bench, with 2.48 pts CPU. That's about 60 percent the performance of a Core i7-870. Significantly higher than anything Atom, Pentium, or AMD E-Series. With SunSpider, the Core M put out a score of 142.8, under Internet Explorer 12 running under Windows 8.1. With 3DMark IceStorm Unlimited, the Core M sprung up a surprise - 50,985 points. That over double that of a Qualcomm Snapdragon 800, and faster than the IGPs AMD E-Series APUs ship with. Color us interested.

Source: HotHardware

Matrox Chooses AMD GPU for Next Generation Multi-display Graphics Cards

Matrox Graphics Inc. today announced that its next line of multi-display graphics cards will be based on AMD GPUs and their corresponding professional grade display drivers. Leveraging over 35 years of experience in board design and manufacturing, Matrox will expand and complement its line of PCI Express-compliant graphics cards for demanding commercial applications. The soon-to-be-launched product line will enable unique features that solve real-world problems in enterprise, industrial, pro A/V, digital signage, security, command and control, and other professional applications. Matrox customers will continue to benefit from the exceptional stability, usability and versatility enabled by Matrox PowerDesk desktop management software, which will be integrated to work seamlessly with AMD's professional display drivers.

"AMD is excited to work with Matrox to deliver compelling industry leading GPUs for their professional users," said Matt Skynner, corporate vice president and general manager, Graphics Business Unit, AMD. "AMD delivers solutions, backed by rock solid drivers, that allow users to realize the full potential of their workstations and produce outstanding results backed by high quality hardware and software application support."

Lenovo Announces New ERAZER X315 Gaming PC and Y70 Touch Notebook

Lenovo today announced at the 2014 IFA Consumer Electronics Unlimited show in Berlin an expanded portfolio of tablets and PCs that gives consumers more options for tablets that fit their mobile lifestyle as well as choices of dedicated gaming PCs. The new lineup kicks off with the TAB S8, Lenovo's first Intel-powered Android tablet. Lenovo also announced two new high-performance gaming PCs: the Y70 Touch, Lenovo's first 17-inch touch laptop with the latest processor and graphics technology for HD gaming, and the ERAZER X315, Lenovo's latest affordable desktop gaming PCs.

XFX Rolls Out its Radeon R9 285 Double Dissipation Graphics Card

XFX joined the Radeon R9 285 launch party with its compact R9 285 Double Dissipation graphics card. Built on an black, custom-design, matte-finish PCB, XFX' card features a lightweight version of its twin-fan cooling solution, which has been featured on its older performance-segment cards, such as the R9 270X. The cooler features a dense aluminium fin stack, to which heat is fed by four 6 mm thick copper heat pipes, which is then ventilated by a pair of 80 mm spinners. The card sticks to AMD reference clock speeds of 918 MHz core, and 5.50 GHz (GDDR5-effective) memory. Based on the 28 nm "Tonga" silicon, the R9 285 features 1,792 Graphics CoreNext 1.2 stream processors, 112 TMUs, 32 ROPs, and a 256-bit wide GDDR5 memory interface, holding 2 GB of memory on this card. Expect it to be priced at US $249.

AMD Radeon R9 295X2 to Get Promotional Price, Open to All

AMD announced a series of retailer-specific promotions for its flagship Radeon R9 295X2 dual-GPU graphics card. The card, which launched at US $1,499, will be available for as low as $999, as part of retailer promotions. End users (you), and not just OEMs, will be able to buy the card at the three-figure price. The card will ship with its usual Radeon Rewards package, giving you access to over a dozen free games. Based on a pair of 28 nm "Hawaii" GPUs, the Radeon R9 295X2 features a total of 5,760 Graphics CoreNext 1.1 stream processors, 352 TMUs, and 128 ROPs, split between its two GPUs, and 8 GB of memory across its two 512-bit wide GDDR5 memory interfaces.

AMD Announces Three New FX-8000 Series Eight-core Processors, New Pricing

AMD made three additions to its FX-8300 series eight-core socket AM3+ processors, along with adjustments to the series' overall pricing. The company launched a new performance-segment part, the FX-8370, along with two energy-efficient eight-core chips, the FX-8370E, and the FX-8320E. The FX-8370 features the same 4.00 GHz nominal clock speed as the FX-8350, but a tiny bit higher TurboCore frequency of 4.30 GHz, compared to the latter's 4.20 GHz. This chip is priced at US $199.

The FX-8370E, on the other hand, features the same maximum TurboCore frequency of 4.30, but its nominal clock speed is much lower, at 3.30 GHz. Not all cores run at TurboCore frequency simultaneously. The FX-8320E features a maximum TurboCore frequency of 4.00 GHz, same as that of the FX-8320, but a lower nominal clock speed, of 3.20 GHz. Both these two parts feature rated TDP of 95W, compared to 125W of the other parts in the series.

ASUS Announces the Radeon R9 285 Strix Graphics Card

ASUS announced the Radeon R9 285 Strix graphics card, based on AMD's latest 28 nm "Tonga" silicon. The card utilizes ASUS' latest Strix cooling solution, which stays silent until a thermal threshold is reached, only beyond which, its fans begin to spool up. Barring its new cooler shroud design and fan-speed management, the Strix cooling solution bears strong resemblance to the company's DirectCU II cooling solution. ASUS is shipping the card with a factory-overclock. Based on the 28 nm "Tonga" silicon, the R9 285 from AMD features 1,792 stream processors, 112 TMUs, 32 ROPs, and a 256-bit wide memory interface, which holds 2 GB of memory on this card.

HIS Announces its Radeon R9 285 IceQ X2 Graphics Card

HIS rolled out is IceQ X2 implementation of AMD's newest Radeon R9 285 graphics card. Available in reference clock (918 MHz core, 5.50 GHz memory), and OC variants (928 MHz core), HIS' cards sport a lightweight variant of the IceQ X2 cooler which was previously implement on the company's R9 270X graphics cards, taking advantage of the lower thermal figures of the R9 285. It appears to be based on a compact non-reference design PCB. The cooler features a dense aluminium fin-stack, cooled by a pair of 80 mm fans. Based on the 28 nm "Tonga" silicon, the R9 285 from AMD features 1,792 stream processors, 112 TMUs, 32 ROPs, and a 256-bit wide memory interface, which holds 2 GB of memory on this card.
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